Author Topic: Teterboro Airport  (Read 101359 times)

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #165 on: December 25, 2008, 08:00:17 PM »

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #166 on: January 01, 2009, 10:25:58 AM »
TEB noise program begins to quiet critics
http://www.ainonline.com/news/single-news-page/article/teb-noise-program-begins-to-quiet-critics/

By Curt Epstein
January 1, 2009
Airports, Business Aviation

In honor of the second anniversary of the launch of the Teterboro Airport Working Groups Pledge to the Community programwhich has as its mission improving the airports relations with its neighbors aviation industry representatives, New Jersey politicians and representatives of the airports governing agency, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, met to take stock of the programs efficacy.

Significant progress has been made since 2006 but there is still much more work to be done, said Rep. Steve Rothman (D-N.J.), one of the brokers of the agreement. His district includes the airport and surrounding neighborhoods. Teterboro Airport has been a noisy and somewhat bothersome neighbor for decades, but it is also a neighbor that employs 1,137 people, creates 15,554 other jobs and generates $1.8 billion in annual economic activity in the region.

In 2006 the major points of the agreement included reducing Stage 2 aircraft operations and the number of nighttime flights at the airport. Since the program went into effect, Stage 2 aircraft operations have decreased 43 percent, while the number of night flights has been reduced by 16 percent. The significant reduction in Stage 2 and overnight operations is a testament to the aviation industrys commitment to this critical initiative, said NATA president James Coyne.

At this years annual NBAA Convention, the airport handed out its Good Neighbor Awards for 2006 and 2007. According to airport manager Richard Heslin, the awards honored aircraft operators who are either based at the airport or those who made more than 100 flights in and out of Teterboro during the yearwho have not violated the night curfew in effect between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m., or operated Stage 2 aircraft into the airport.

While adherence to the TEB Working Groups curfew and Stage 2 aircraft ban is called voluntary, abiding by the airports noise policy isnt. Although the Airport Noise and Capacity Act passed by Congress in 1990 prohibits airports from establishing new noise or access rulesaccording to the Port Authority of New York and New Jerseythose such as Teterboro which had pre-existing restrictions were allowed to grandfather them in. The airport has restrictions on the acceptable noise levels for departures from the airport, which can vary according to the time of day, and Heslin has a serious enforcement system at his disposal to ensure that violators are quickly brought in line. If an aircraft operator departing the airport exceeds the acceptable noise level, I send it a violation letter. If it receives three violations in a two-year period, that aircraft is banned from the airport forever, he said.

Despite this system, some still see significant areas for improvement. When the Working Group announced these pledges two years ago it had just over 50 percent of the operators at Teterboro voluntarily agreeing to abide by these pledges and it set a goal of having 90 percent signed up by the end of 2007. Unfortunately it has fallen well short of that goal since just over 60 percent of the operators have signed up so far, said Rothman. Since its creation, more than 300 signatories have joined the program.

Rothman also expressed disappointment in the modest reduction in overnight flights seen at the airport. He commented, We must work toward banning those flights completely and improving the quality of life of the residents
of the area.

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #167 on: January 05, 2009, 06:10:02 PM »
Public opinion of Teterboro teeters back and forth
From: http://leadernewspapers.net/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=9228&new_topic=18
By Bernadette Marciniak
Reporter

TETERBORO (Jan. 5, 2009, 4:45 p.m.) Over the years, the residents who live along the elevated ridge in Carlstadt and Wood-Ridge have dealt with the consequences of Teterboro Airport and its constant comings and goings. Whether its the sound of a passing airplane drowning out a conversation or the flight path of an aircraft a little too low for comfort, these residents have a backyard view to a controversial neighborhood staple.

But for many, Teterboro Airport is a lifeline to gainful employment. These people are either employed by the airport themselves, or they are one of the many who bank on the local business the airport brings in every year.

The difference between the two extremes is sharp, and local officials are looking for middle ground to appease both sides.

U.S. Rep. Steve Rothman (NJ-9) is at the forefront of such efforts.

As long as progress is being made, in terms of reducing the overall number of flights; reducing the nighttime flights; keeping the largest aircraft out; making safety improvements, security improvements and the like; it would be unwise to close the airport, Rothman pointed out in a phone interview.

Teterboro employs roughly 1,200 workers and creates up to 16,000 more jobs in industries that depend on the airport, generating $1.8 billion, according to the Teterboro Economic Impact Study conducted in 2005.

We want to work hard in these tough economic times to make sure we dont damage this vital economic center, Rothman continued.

A voluntary curfew was put on the airport in 2006, restricting pilots from taking off or landing between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m., except for extreme cases, such as ambulatory aviation. Congress has also pushed for the abandonment of Stage II aircraft the older planes that make some of the loudest noise. In addition, Rothman has asked for efficiency to be considered, so that empty or near-empty planes wait until more cargo can be added before taking off.

With this progress, Teterboro is still making money while decreasing the number of flights that leave from the airport, said Rothman.

With these measures in place, the number of complaints around the airport has decreased, cited Bob Decheine, Rothmans chief of staff.

As of right now, 60 percent of airplane operators using Teterboro have agreed to the voluntary restrictions recommended by Rothman and others. The goal is to have these operators use peer pressure to persuade the rest of the operators to sign on as well, said Decheine.

But some pilots conduct their business at night only, making the nighttime curfew impossible to follow.

Also, the 60 percent of pledging pilots was supposed to be 90 percent by 2007.

In addition, National Air Transportation Association Vice President Eric Byer said that even though running newer airplanes is cheaper in the long run, Stage III aircraft are almost three times more expensive than Stage II and not everyone can afford them.

If a compromise cant be reached, restrictions could be made mandatory, said Decheine. Many of the pilots then could be compelled to take their business elsewhere, like nearby Morristown Municipal Airport.

However, this might not be the best choice either as Teterboros problems would simply just be passed on, according to an article in the Centennial Aviation & Business Journal. Morristown, along with many other airports, is also trying to phase out the louder airplanes and combat common airport problems.

Decheine stressed that pilots who move wouldnt have the same proximity to New York City and other facilities such as medical labs that lie close to Teterboro.

According to the economic study, many of the 2,800 employees at Quest Diagnostics, a medical testing center, say that they wouldnt be in the area if it werent for Teterboro.

Furthermore, Bergen County property values would decrease by almost $500 million because the gross economic activity the airport provides would substantially decrease, according to the economic impact study.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has been trying to work with Rothman and his supporters on this issue.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has made a concerted effort in recent years to be a good neighbor to Teterboro Airports surrounding communities, wrote Port Authority spokesperson Ron Marsico in an e-mail. We have worked with Rep. Rothman and our aviation partners to reduce noise and the size of aircraft landing at the facility. We appreciate his comments and look forward to improving on the progress we already have made to help ensure safety and improve the quality of life for nearby residents.

In 2004, the Port Authority approved $45 million for a school soundproofing program, with the purpose of creating quieter classrooms in schools that are affected by the noise coming from Teterboro and other area airports.

As a general rule, things have improved, said Andrew Anderson, a resident of Wood-Ridge, who lives on Woodridge Street. Its still noisy. (But) things have changed.

Rothman said he still wants to see more effort being made so that the value of Teterboro can stay intact while local residents can rest quietly.

Progress needs to be made every single day, Rothman said.

Offline Homer Jones

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #168 on: January 16, 2009, 12:54:21 PM »
By now everyone has heard about yesterdays crash of an airliner into the Hudson River and the heroic efforts of the pilot to save the passenger's and crewmember's lives. If you read the articles in all the papers today, you can see that an air traffic controller "suggested" that the pilot attempt a landing at Teterboro Airport. The suggestion was made while the aircraft was somewhere over the Bronx.
As we know, the Bronx is north of Hackensack and Teterboro Airport is south of Hackensack. Fortunately the pilot disregarded the suggestion and ditched the aircraft in the Hudson River.
If the pilot had chosen the Teterboro Airport option, the flight path may well have taken the plane right over Prospect Avenue.
You can figure out the rest of the this scenario.

Offline BLeafe

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #169 on: January 16, 2009, 02:27:12 PM »
If the pilot had chosen the Teterboro Airport option, the flight path may well have taken the plane right over Prospect Avenue.
You can figure out the rest of the this scenario.

Plus, even if it DID make it to Teterboro, would the runways have been long enough for an Airbus A320?

I think either scenario would have been a disaster.



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Offline Homer Jones

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #170 on: January 16, 2009, 03:30:54 PM »
Here is something really interesting, if not prophetic.
Microsoft has a program  known as FLIGHT SIMULATOR X which allows a player to select a type of aircraft, an airport, time of day and weather conditions from a list. I have the program and one of the aircraft that you can select is an Airbus 321 which is almost identical to the plane that went down yesterday. You can select an airport including Laguardia. Coincidentally the default runway is runway 4 which is the same runway that the US AIR flight used. The default time for the afternoon is 2:37 PM which is almost an hour before the US AIR flight departed.
What this all means is that a player can simulate almost the exact route in almost the same plane and experience what the pilot experienced within the same time frame.
The scenery component is true to life including the location and runway configuration at Teterboro Airport as well as the Hudson River location where he set the plane down.
Of course I have tried to duplicate the flight on the simulator with the expected results for one who has never flown a commercial aircraft.
The one thing that becomes apparant is that this pilot only had a few seconds to make his decision whether to try Teterboro or ditch the plane in the River. Luckily for Hackensack, he made the right decision.

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #171 on: January 16, 2009, 04:07:55 PM »
Does your simulated plane float 60 blocks once you "land" in the Hudson?


Offline Homer Jones

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #172 on: January 16, 2009, 04:53:34 PM »
No need to my good man. A couple of keystrokes and I am back on Runway 4 heading back into the wild blue yonder or in my case, the the deep blue sea.

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #173 on: January 16, 2009, 09:33:30 PM »
There is at least one runway at Teterboro that can handle a landing of a lightly loaded 747.  an A320 would be no problem.  the 747 would only be able to take off empty though.

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #174 on: January 16, 2009, 11:36:35 PM »
I think Teaneck and Bogota would have been at risk had the aircraft attempted to reach Teterboro, not necessarily Prospect Avenue

Teterboro also has a runway that comes in from the Northeast, generally over Bogota and then the First Ward of Hackensack.  That may have been first choice in an emergency situation arising over the Bronx.

Somehow I envision that plane crash landing in the Overpeck Creek or perhaps the Hackensack River near the Bergen County Jail, if he could make it that far. Would have been an icier landing, I bet.

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #175 on: February 04, 2009, 11:07:33 AM »
6 connected to Teterboro crash indicted
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--teterborocrash0204feb04,0,1877719.story

February 4, 2009
NEWARK, N.J. - Six people connected to a charter jet company that operated a flight that crashed at Teterboro Airport in 2005 have been indicted for conspiring to violate regulatory practices.

The flight failed to take off, smashed through a fence, crossed heavily traveled Route 46 and slammed into a warehouse. No one was killed, but 20 people were injured.

Investigators said the flight crew did not properly calculate the plane's center of gravity due to over-fueling.

In the indictment unsealed Wednesday, five officials and a pilot who worked for the now-defunct Platinum Jet Management of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., were charged with conspiracy to purposely violate regulatory requirements for operating commercial aircraft.


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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #176 on: March 26, 2009, 05:52:17 PM »
Double Trouble For Private Jets
By Richard Newman / The Record (Hackensack, N.J.)
Thursday, March 26, 2009
HACKENSACK, N.J. - Its not only the down economy thats hurting the private jet business.

Public outcries against government-bailout-seeking executives flying around in luxurious corporate jets also have contributed to steep declines in orders for new jets and cancellations of existing orders for jet makers.

The stigma on private jet travel is putting well-paying aviation jobs at risk, said John Rosanvallon, chief executive officer of Dassault Falcon at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey. Dassault Falcons French parent, Dassault Aviation SA, said last week that orders for new jets fell to 115 last year from 212 in 2007, and that some customers have canceled orders in recent months.

Other aircraft makers also are hurting. Wichita, Kan.-based Cessna Aircraft Co. plans to lay off 4,600, or 30 percent of its workforce, amid declining orders. Hawker Beechcraft Corp., also in Wichita, cut 2,300 jobs in February.

Rosanvallon has joined other private-aviation industry leaders in arguing that the criticisms are unfair and are exacerbating an already difficult situation, with corporations tightening their travel budgets. "When you look at use of business aviation, its not just a few fat cats traveling around," he said in a recent interview. "Its used by a lot of middle-management people."

French-owned Dassault Falcon employs nearly 500 people at Teterboro with a payroll of about $50 million a year, Rosanvallon said.

Flights at Teterboro, one of the busiest private jetports in the country, are down more than 30 percent this year, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the airports operator.

Widespread criticism of private jet travel came to the fore last year when the leaders of struggling U.S. automakers flew in corporate jets to Washington to tell lawmakers why they need taxpayer assistance.

The Obama administration in January pressured Citigroup Inc., which has received tens of billions of dollars in government assistance, to cancel an order for a $50 million Falcon 7X. The 7X, which has been flying since mid-2007, has been a hot seller for Dassault Falcon. It seats 12 and can reach Honolulu from New York without refueling.

Rosanvallon declined to comment on specific deals. Citigroups cancellation was "just one example," he said. "The automotive thing got more publicity," he said.

Dassault Falcon jet orders from Citigroup, Royal Bank of Scotland Plc and American International Group Inc. "are now worthless," said Charles Edelstenne, CEO of Dassault Falcons parent company, according to the Wall Street Journal.

However, companies that cancel orders often lose deposits in the millions of dollars.

Rosanvallon said Friday that some job cuts may be coming soon to Teterboro because of the industrys deepening woes. The cuts "will be modest compared to Wichita," he said, referring to the layoffs at Cessna and Hawker.

He will have more information about job reductions in about a month, he said.

Corporations are in no hurry to buy new jets. JPMorgan Chase & Co. said this week that it has no plans to purchase new jets or renovate an aircraft hangar until after it has paid off the money it received as part of the governments bank investment program last fall. Chase received $25 billion from the governments Troubled Asset Relief Program.

Blue Star Jets, LLC is an air charter broker who is an agent of its customers. Blue Star Jets, LLC is not an air carrier and does not own or operate the aircraft on which its clients fly. All Flights are operated by Part 135 Carriers. Operators providing service for Blue Star Jets' clients must meet standards set forth by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #177 on: May 28, 2009, 07:49:42 PM »
Teterboro runway slated for $27M makeover
Thursday, May 28, 2009
BY TOM DAVIS
NorthJersey.com

A heavily-used, aging runway at Teterboro will get a $27 million overhaul over the next year, Port Authority officials said Thursday.

The bi-state agencys Board of Commissioners approved the project that will receive about $5 million in federal stimulus funding.

The repair is part of the agencys runway maintenance that occurs every seven to 10 years and leads to minimal or no disruption in aircraft operations, said Chris Ward, the Port Authoritys executive director.

Its the Port Authoritys commitment to maintaining all of our assets on a first class basis, Ward said.

The runways foundation, which hasnt been renovated in 14 years, will be repaved and rebuilt beginning in June, said Bill DeCota, aviation director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

The agency hired Tilcon of New York to perform the work, which will also include improving the runways drainage, lighting and communication systems.

The Port Authority plans to close the runway only on weekends, shifting traffic to other airports.

Traffic at the Teterboro, which is one of the busiest airports in the country and handles private aviation, drops by 50 percent on weekends.

Its noteworthy, DeCota said. Its a big project. Its sophisticated.

The 6,015-foot asphalt surface, known as Runway 6-24, is one of two runways at Teterboro Airport and runs from the southwest to the northeast.

The U.S. Department of Transportation announced last month that Teterboro and Somerset airports will receive $5.6 million in federal stimulus funds for airport improvement projects.

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said he had established a team to ensure that economic recovery funding is made available for transportation infrastructure projects.

The Teterboro project is part of the Port Authority's $3.3 billion capital budget for 2009. The agency on Tuesday also approved paying $3.3 million to restructure ramps that connect to the main span of the George Washington Bridge.

 

E-mail: davist@northjersey.com

 

A heavily-used, aging runway at Teterboro will get a $27 million overhaul over the next year, Port Authority officials said Thursday.

The bi-state agencys Board of Commissioners approved the project that will receive about $5 million in federal stimulus funding.

The repair is part of the agencys runway maintenance that occurs every seven to 10 years and leads to minimal or no disruption in aircraft operations, said Chris Ward, the Port Authoritys executive director.

Its the Port Authoritys commitment to maintaining all of our assets on a first class basis, Ward said.

The runways foundation, which hasnt been renovated in 14 years, will be repaved and rebuilt beginning in June, said Bill DeCota, aviation director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

The agency hired Tilcon of New York to perform the work, which will also include improving the runways drainage, lighting and communication systems.

The Port Authority plans to close the runway only on weekends, shifting traffic to other airports.

Traffic at the Teterboro, which is one of the busiest airports in the country and handles private aviation, drops by 50 percent on weekends.

Its noteworthy, DeCota said. Its a big project. Its sophisticated.

The 6,015-foot asphalt surface, known as Runway 6-24, is one of two runways at Teterboro Airport and runs from the southwest to the northeast.

The U.S. Department of Transportation announced last month that Teterboro and Somerset airports will receive $5.6 million in federal stimulus funds for airport improvement projects.

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said he had established a team to ensure that economic recovery funding is made available for transportation infrastructure projects.

The Teterboro project is part of the Port Authority's $3.3 billion capital budget for 2009. The agency on Tuesday also approved paying $3.3 million to restructure ramps that connect to the main span of the George Washington Bridge.

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #178 on: August 15, 2009, 10:42:56 PM »
When I read the article below, it reminded me of an earlier post where a Teterboro air traffic controller complained about the lack of controllers in the tower.  

Controller bantering about dead cat before crash

WASHINGTON The air traffic controller handling the small plane involved in a deadly crash with a helicopter over the Hudson River was chatting on the telephone about a dead cat at the airport and initially failed to warn the pilot of other aircraft in his path, officials say.

The controller tried unsuccessfully to contact the pilot before the accident, officials said Friday, but the plane collided with a tour helicopter over the Hudson River, killing nine people.

The controller handling the plane and his supervisor at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey at the time of the accident a week ago have been placed on administrative leave pending an investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

The National Transportation Safety Board said in a report that the controller, who has not been identified, cleared the single-engine Piper for takeoff at 11:48 and 30 seconds a.m. EDT, then made a telephone call. He remained on the phone, including while further instructing the plane's pilot, until the accident happened.

The phone call, to an airport contractor, was a "silly conversation" concerning a dead cat that had been removed from the airport, a retired union official said, in an account supported by transportation officials also familiar with the contents of the call.

After takeoff, the plane flew southbound until the controller directed it to turn left toward the river, the report said. At 11:52 and 20 seconds, the controller instructed the plane to contact air traffic control at nearby Newark Liberty International Airport, which is part of the procedure for handing off oversight of the small plane.

The pilot apparently did not contact Newark, the report said.

Radar data show there were several aircraft immediately ahead of the plane, including the tour helicopter, "all of which were potential traffic conflicts for the airplane," but the Teterboro controller didn't warn the pilot, the report said.

It wasn't until controllers at the Newark airport alerted the Teterboro controller to the potential collision that he twice tried unsuccessfully to contact the pilot, the report said. The collision occurred at 11:53 and 14 seconds.

At the time the Newark controllers were alerting the Teterboro controller to the danger, they also recommended the plane turn southwest. The plane's pilot apparently overhead that and acknowledged the instruction, the report said.

Video of the crash taken by a tourist sightseeing near the Statute of Liberty show the Piper changing direction seconds before its wing was clipped by the helicopter's rotors. The plane then broke apart in the air and both aircraft plunged into the Hudson.

Union officials representing air traffic controllers said the Teterboro controller couldn't have warned the Piper pilot of the helicopter in its path at the time the plane was directed toward the river. They said the helicopter was just taking off and hadn't appeared on the radar screen yet.

"He was out of communication with the guy by the time the helicopter ever popped up on anybody's radar scope," said Phil Barbarello, National Air Traffic Controllers Association eastern region vice president.

The FAA has said there is no reason to believe the controller's actions contributed to the accident. However, the agency said the phone conversation was inappropriate and such conduct is unacceptable. The safety board, in a pointed statement, said it was too early to reach any conclusions about controllers in the crash.

The supervisor's conduct also is being investigated because he was out of the building at the time. Controllers, including supervisors, are expected to be available throughout their work shift in case they are needed, even if they are taking a break.

The NTSB report said two other Teterboro controllers were taking a break at the time of the accident. The only controllers on duty were the controller who was talking on the phone and another controller who was handling arriving planes and ground traffic.


The phone call, made on a landline that controllers use to contact other parts of the airport, was to an employee of Baltimore-based AvPORTS, a contractor for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which manages the airport, according to port authority officials.

"He was talking to the Port Authority about a dead cat on the taxiway ... it turned into a silly conversation," said Barrett Byrnes, a recently retired air traffic controller and former National Air Traffic Controllers Association representative who stays in touch with New York and New Jersey controllers. "There was a little banter."

Three officials close to the investigation verified that the banter was about a cat carcass on the airport grounds.

A federal task force began work Friday on improving safety procedures for pilots flying in the busy airspace around New York City and was given 10 days to report, the FAA said.

________________________
April 3, 2006 post:

This showed up on AVWeb

ATC Staffing

I am a controller at TEB airport [Teterboro, N.J.]. There are many times where there are only two controllers in the Tower because we are short staffed, and management does not want to call in overtime to make up staffing. We are supposed to have five positions open but only have two on certain days. They usually combine Local, Ground control, and CIC [controller in charge]. The local controller should be focusing on the runways and the aircrafts in the air. With the positions combined the Local controller now has to worry about the aircraft on taxiways has well. Sometime you have controllers staying in the Tower the whole day without a break.

This is a safety issue to all the flying public. This can also cause delays and have aircraft burning fuel on the ground when they should be flying. Safety is what we should focus on, not on how much management can cut back and get away with it. The FAA is going to continue this way until the flying public has had enough or something happens.

Name withheld by request

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #179 on: August 17, 2009, 11:29:34 PM »
NTSB changes key point in Hudson collision report

The board now says in a statement released Monday that while the controller at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey failed to warn of several aircraft in the path of the single-engine Piper, the tour helicopter wasn't one of the aircraft on the controller's radar screen until seven seconds after the handoff to nearby Newark Liberty International Airport.


The Teterboro controller made a personal phone call shortly after clearing the Piper for takeoff at 11:48 a.m. EDT and remained on the phone until the collision five minutes later, even while he was directing traffic, according to the board and the Federal Aviation Administration.


"Even if the investigation reveals their (controllers') actions did not contribute to the accident, it represents a serious violation of FAA procedures," said Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va.


Regardless of who is to blame for this latest crash, it's frightening to learn just how incompetent people charged with our safety can be. That goes for management too.