Author Topic: Teterboro Airport  (Read 103429 times)

Offline Editor

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #180 on: August 21, 2009, 12:45:48 AM »
Teterboro incident investigations top area airports
Thursday, August 20, 2009
Last updated: Thursday August 20, 2009, 9:34 PM
BY TOM DAVIS
The Record

Federal investigators have probed more than twice the number of incidents that raised safety concerns at Teterboro than they have at New York Citys two major airports since 2004, according to National Transportation Safety Board records.

Those airports John F. Kennedy International and LaGuardia have more than twice the amount of traffic and, unlike Teterboro, cater to larger commercial aircraft.

One Teterboro incident that prompted an NTSB probe involved the Aug. 8 fatal mid-air collision over the Hudson River. The NTSB has said a Teterboro controller failed to warn a pilot of potential traffic conflicts before his plane crashed, killing nine.

The NTSB investigates incidents that severely impact the safety of flight crews, airport employees and passengers, said Keith Holloway, a board spokesman. Those incidents involve fatalities, substantial damage to an aircraft or close calls between airplanes and people and equipment on the ground.

An aircraft tire blowing out may not rise to that level, Holloway said.

The investigations underscore the concerns aviation advocates, controllers and experts have raised about Teterboro, which caters to smaller general aviation but, nevertheless, is one of the busiest airports in the nation.

Its just so congested, said Matthew Ziemkiewicz, president of the National Air Disaster Alliance, a group that represents pilots and travelers. Im not convinced they [Teterboros staff] have the latest and greatest technology to do the job effectively.

Newark Liberty International Airport also lags behind Teterboro in terms of incidents that have sparked a federal probe over the past five years despite having nearly three times the amount of air traffic, according to NTSB records.

The NTSB has completed investigations into 13 incidents that raised safety concerns at Teterboro since Jan. 1, 2004, compared to 10 at Newark, 5 at JFK and 4 at LaGuardia.

Nearly all of the incidents involved either controller error or pilot mistakes, according to the NTSBs conclusions identified in the probable cause component of its investigation reports.

Jim Peters, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman, declined to comment other than saying: The NTSB did its investigations and issued its probable cause [reports] for those accidents.

Doug Church, a spokesman for the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, said the focus on Teterboros safety concerns is unfortunate because his organization believes the airports controller staff had nothing to do with the Aug. 8 crash.

At Teterboro, however, controllers have complained they work in cramped conditions that barely give them space to maneuver. They also struggle to live in one of the country's most expensive regions since their salaries are at the low end of the FAA pay scale.

Its a major airport that has its own unique challenges, Church said last week.

Close calls have been a problem at Teterboro, and two incidents labeled incursions by the FAA inspired the NTSB last year to launch investigations into how wayward jets got within hundreds of feet of people and aircraft.

On June 25, 2008, a Learjet landed on a closed runway. A controller working solo at 5:34 a.m. had allowed the aircraft which came within 150 feet of two ground workers to land on the closed runway, according to the FAA.

On July 9, 2008, at 10:10 a.m., a controller was slow to stop a Cessna from approaching an intersecting runway, according to the NTSB. The airplane came with 1,200 feet of a Dassault Falcon that was preparing to take off.

The probe determined that controller failure played a role in the incidents.

Veteran New Jersey flight instructor and pilot Joseph Blakaitis, who has flown to Teterboro many times, said the airport involves a lot of attention to detail because of its close proximity to three major airports that have heavy commercial air traffic.

Its a confined airspace you have to be where youre supposed to be and do what youre supposed to do, he said. If a pilot doesnt like the airport, the best thing is to stay the hell out of it.

But George Weng, a Rutgers University professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, said the airport could improve its safety by having airplanes land with less frequency. He said the FAA allows too many to land too close together particularly at Newark.

You dont want takeoffs and landings every 30 seconds thats no good, he said.

Ziemkiewicz, who lost his sister in the TWA Flight 800 crash off Long Island in 1996, called on the FAA to expedite the introduction of satellite technology that could follow planes and help pilots follow routes using technology thats comparable to a car GPS system.

I dont know many people without a GPS to help them get where they want to go, he said.

E-mail: davist@northjersey.com

Offline Prospect Avenue Coalition

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #181 on: August 21, 2009, 07:51:21 AM »
Plane crashes while trying to land at Teterboro; 2 injured
Friday, August 21, 2009
Last updated: Friday August 21, 2009, 7:30 AM
BY TOM DAVIS AND JENNIFER CUNNINGHAM STAFF WRITERS
The Record


Two people were seriously injured when their small plane overshot the runway at Teterboro Airport, hit a tree and came barreling down onto the lawn of a business on Route 46 early this morning.

Both the pilot and co-pilot suffered severe burns; one was airlifted to St. Barnabas Medical Center and the other to Hackensack University Medical Center, police said.

The Federal Aviation Administration, the state Department of Transportation, state and county police and local firefighters are on the scene. Police are waiting for the National Transportation Safety Board to arrive at the airport and take control of the investigation.

Little Ferry police say the twin-engine Beechcraft crashed while trying to land. Police believe the flight had originated in Reading, Pa., and was carrying blood specimens for Qwest Diagnostics. The pilot and co-pilot were the only ones aboard, and everyone on the ground appears to be safe.

The injured were able to crawl out of the wreckage after the plane fell short of landing on runway 19.

The accident comes two weeks after an air collision over the Hudson River killed nine people. Federal investigators said a Teterboro controller failed to notice potential traffic conflicts before the crash.

Federal investigators have probed more than twice the number of incidents that raised safety concerns at Teterboro than they have at New York Citys two major airports since 2004, according to National Transportation Safety Board records.

Police have cordoned off the portion of Route 46 where the plane disintegrated and erupted in flames. The mangled remains of the plane are scattered along the road and on the lawn of Flomo Corp, 698 Route 46.

The investigations underscore the concerns aviation advocates, controllers and experts have raised about Teterboro, a small general aviation airport that is one of the busiest in the country, and is in close proximity to three major airports.

Those airports John F. Kennedy International, Newark Liberty and LaGuardia have more than twice the amount of traffic and, unlike Teterboro, cater to larger commercial aircraft.

Route 46 is open, and the airport has resumed operations.

 LIVE VIDEO FROM MYFOXNY.COM

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #182 on: August 22, 2009, 08:13:11 AM »
1010WINS

Posted: Friday, 21 August 2009 6:27PM

Small Plane Crashes Near Teterboro Airport, 2 Injured

http://www.1010wins.com/PICS--2-Walk-Away-from-Fiery-Plane-Crash-at-Teterb/5053579

Excerpt from article:

TETERBORO, N.J. (AP/1010 WINS)  -- A report released by the Government Accountability Office last year found that Teterboro had 23 runway incursions -- incidents in which aircraft strayed into areas designated for takeoffs and landings -- from fiscal 2001 through 2007, two fewer than nearby Newark Liberty International Airport, which handles about three times as many flights annually. Three of the Teterboro incursions were classified as serious, meaning there was a risk of planes colliding, more than occurred at major airports in Philadelphia, Boston and Miami over the same period.

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #183 on: August 25, 2009, 08:27:07 AM »
New alarms sounded on safety
Friday, August 21, 2009
Last updated: Saturday August 22, 2009, 9:21 AM
BY MATTHEW VAN DUSEN AND ASHLEY KINDERGAN
The Record
Staff Writers

Local officials called for stronger oversight of Teterboro Airport on Friday, saying there should be fewer airplanes flying in and out of the densely populated area or greater control of the airspace.

Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-Paterson, said the crash of the twin-engine propeller plane on Friday, which comes two weeks after a deadly collision over the Hudson River involving a plane from Teterboro, demands a response by regulators and lawmakers.

Now is the time to act, said Pascrell, who said he would reach out to his former colleagues on the House Transportation Committee about an investigation. Actually, the time to act was yesterday.

Pascrells concern was matched by people who live and work near the airport, which is among the three busiest general aviation airports in the nation.

Sometimes were outside half an hour for lunch and we count about 12 planes, said Fran Izzo, who works at E. Wortmann Machine Works, Inc., next to where the plane crashed on Friday.

Machinist Andy Dymek added, I always said someday its going to happen here. We always think about it, but theres nothing we can do.

But pilot groups and local officials said the numbers show that the airport, contrary to recent reports, is safe.

Chris Dancy, a spokesman for the non-profit Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, said that there were 19 accidents from 1989 to 2008 involving planes either approaching the airport, on the ground, or immediately after departing, according to National Transportation Safety Board data.

Those accidents caused six deaths and five serious injuries to people on the airplanes and two serious injuries to people on the ground, he said. The numbers do not include Fridays crash, which seriously injured a pilot and co-pilot or the Aug. 8 crash over the Hudson River that killed nine people three people in a plane that departed from Teterboro and six in a sightseeing helicopter from New York.

One accident per year out of 100,000 flights per year is not bad, Dancy said, citing Teterboros 2007 air traffic numbers from the Federal Aviation Administration.

He added that Teterboro sees pilots with different levels of experience and a wide variety of aircraft so it is harder to achieve the same safety numbers as major airports.

Dancy said that the airport is not just a hub for CEOs flying on private jets its an important tool for easing congestion at the three major New York City airports and provides a way for businesses to extend their reach.

Teterboro Borough Administrator Paul Bush, who believes the airport is run well, said that the proximity to New York means that every minor accident and incursion receives scrutiny.

We have other accidents around us everyday, Bush said. When an airplane has a problem it makes news and they have some kind of investigation.

Even critics such as Pascrell conceded that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the airport, have improved it in recent years.

The Port Authority has banned noisy jets and aircraft that weigh more than 100,000 pounds and imposed a curfew between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. for all aircraft except air ambulances, according to officials.

Were very mindful of our role in trying to make this place as safe as possible, said Susan Baer, the deputy director of the Port Authoritys aviation department.

The airport also employs more than 1,100 people, creates many more jobs in the region and generates about $1.8 billion of economic activity, according to figures cited in 2008 by Rep. Steve Rothman, D-Fair Lawn, who represents the area that includes the airport.

Rothman, a longtime critic of pollution, noise and air traffic at the airport was waiting for more information on Fridays crash before commenting, a spokeswoman said.

Pascrell said he would reach out to the House Transportation Committee chairman, Rep. James Oberstar, D-Minnesota, whom he called an expert on air traffic. He did not lay out specific plans for regulation of the airport.

Bergen County Executive Dennis McNerney said he would also ask county officials to review Teterboros operations and talk to the Port Authority about how it is using Stewart International Airport in New York to reduce traffic.

The county has not taken a stance on what if anything should change at Teterboro.

But McNerney said he was concerned about the close proximity of the crash site to the countys technical high school. He also cited the 2005 crash of a jet that skidded across Route 46 after a failed takeoff.

"This is really getting too close for comfort, the number of accidents that are going on down there," McNerney said.

Staff writers Nick Clunn and Mike Kelly contributed to this article. E-mail: vandusen@northjersey.com and Kindergan@northjersey.com

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #184 on: September 19, 2009, 08:49:14 PM »
Menendez calls for upgrades at Teterboro
Friday, September 18, 2009
BY TOM DAVIS
The Record
STATE HOUSE BUREAU

U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez wants the Obama administration to pay for a new traffic tower at Teterboro Airport that would give controllers improved visibility and provide them with more modern equipment.

In a letter to President Obama on Wednesday, Menendez asked that money be included in the administrations fiscal year 2011 budget request, citing two recent crashes involving Teterboro as inspiration for upgrading the small but busy airport.

Menendez did not offer specifics, but air traffic controllers say the Federal Aviation Administration should build a tower anywhere from 10 feet to 50 feet higher so they see over trees surrounding the airport.

The existing 34-year-old structure is about 100 feet tall, though controllers say the height of the tower was not a factor in an Aug. 8 air collision over the Hudson River that killed nine people.

"Investing in a new tower now will be a down payment on meaningful safety improvements for decades to come," Menendez wrote in the letter.

Two weeks after the Aug. 8 crash, another small plane crashed outside the airports gates. No one was injured in that incident.

A Senate Commerce Committee subcommittee on aviation held hearings on the crashes this week, and federal officials testified that the busy airport lacks updated equipment that could better track departing planes.

Members of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association were pleased with Menendezs recommendation, pointing out that Teterboro is one of the three busiest airports in the nation that cater to general aviation.

Dave Gioffe, the unions Teterboro representative, said controllers struggle to see planes arriving at the airport, and equipment used to measure wind occasionally offers "the wrong reading."

The wind-measurement equipment also is old and not digitalized, he said, making it susceptible to breakdowns and mistakes.

"Sometimes we have to land people with severe cross winds," he said.

In his letter, Menendez said congestion continues to be an issue in the New Jersey and New York City airspace despite the recession. Local airports routinely have among the most airplane delays of any facilities in the nation.

Menendez expects the aviation system to continue growing in a region that has 12 airports within 50 miles of Manhattan.

"The recent tragic events in the airspace surrounding Teterboro highlight the need to upgrade the facility, equip it with state-of-the-art technology and, in turn, deliver important safety improvements," he wrote.

E-mail: davist@northjersey.com

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #185 on: November 19, 2010, 11:31:04 PM »
Not sure how I missed this...

Plane overshoots Teterboro runway, is stopped by arrestor bed

Friday, October 1, 2010
Last updated: Friday October 1, 2010, 8:47 PM
BY NICK CLUNN
The Record
STAFF WRITER

TETERBORO A special cement meant to prevent planes from overshooting runways stopped one Friday less than 300 feet from Route 46 saving the lives of nine people on board and countless others on the ground.

No one was injured when the Gulfstream G-IV reached the end of the 6,000-foot runway at Teterboro Airport and plowed into an arrestor bed, bringing it to a halt, said Jennifer Friedberg, a spokeswoman for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates the airport.

The blocks of aerated cement that form the bed are meant to have the same effect as gradually deepening snow would to a moving car. The jet did not show any obvious signs of damage, although its tires and landing gear were buried in the blocks.

Two men who were attempting to jump-start a car in a parking lot across from the airport when the plane landed said it briefly looked as if it was attempting to take off before coming to rest.

Look, look, look! one said to the other, neither wanting to give their names.

It was at least the second time that an arrestor bed has stopped a plane at Teterboro since they were installed one year after a jet ran off a runway in 2005, hitting cars and a warehouse on Route 46.

Kyle May, who attends Bergen County Technical High School across Route 46, said the plane Friday would have at least gotten to the highway if not for the bed. He recalled being at the high school with his older brother days after the 2005 crash, watching workers tend to the wreckage.

Seeing where it stopped definitely makes me feel safer, he said.

The jet, which carried two pilots and seven passengers, landed about 1:45 p.m. after taking off from Toronto, Friedberg said. It was not clear who was on board, or who sat behind the controls.

An employee of Meridian, the fixed-base operator that handled the flight at the general aviation airport, said no one from the company wanted to comment.

Public records identified the jets owner as Wilmington Trust, a bank in Delaware. But bank spokesman Bill Benintende said Wilmington Trust only held title to the plane. Someone else, whose identity the bank would not disclose, operated and maintained the aircraft.

A spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said the agency is investigating the accident.

E-mail: clunn@northjersey.com

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #186 on: November 20, 2010, 01:03:51 AM »
Not sure how I missed this...

Plane overshoots Teterboro runway, is stopped by arrestor bed

Friday, October 1, 2010
...It was at least the second time that an arrestor bed has stopped a plane at Teterboro since they were installed one year after a jet ran off a runway in 2005, hitting cars and a warehouse on Route 46.


Well, here's next month's find:

Jet company president guilty on most serious charge in Teterboro crash case

Monday, November 15, 2010

BY PETER J. SAMPSON
The Record
STAFF WRITER

The former president of a luxury charter company whose plane barreled off a Teterboro Airport runway in 2005 put profits ahead of safety in a scheme to overload jets with cheap fuel, a jury ruled Monday.

The jury of seven men and five women returned split verdicts in Newark against the Guyana-born brothers Michael and Paul Brassington, executives and co-founders of the now-defunct Platinum Jet Management LLC of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Michael Brassington, the companys former president, chief operating officer and chief pilot, was portrayed by prosecutors as the architect of a brazen scheme to defraud passengers, charter brokers, the Federal Aviation Administration and others by misrepresenting his companys compliance with safety regulations.

He was found guilty on the most serious charge of endangering the safety of an aircraft in flight. The jury found him guilty on eight additional charges and cleared him on 12 counts of making false statements.

His younger brother, a former vice president largely responsible for marketing, was found guilty only of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and was acquitted on four other counts.

The charge of endangering the safety of an aircraft in flight, which normally is used in terrorism cases, related to Michael Brassingtons concealment of dangerous over-fueling and weight distribution practices that caused the jets center of gravity to exceed its forward weight limit for takeoff, contributing to the Feb. 2, 2005, Teterboro crash, authorities said.

Prosecutors charged he misled the flight officer responsible for fueling and preparing the weight and balance graphs by informing him that the plane was 1,000 pounds lighter than it actually was. As a result, the twinjets nose failed to lift off at the expected speed, causing the pilot to abort the takeoff as he quickly ran out of runway.

Traveling at speeds approaching 200 miles per hour, the Bombardier Challenger 600 jet plowed through a steel perimeter fence and struck two cars as it crossed six lanes of Route 46 before crashing into a clothing warehouse and bursting into flames. Both pilots and two passengers were seriously injured.

A pattern of fraud and deception is not a business plan, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman said in a statement. Todays verdict confirms that there are consequences when you break the law to boost your bottom line.

Lawyers for the two defendants declined comment after the verdict, which came on the fourth day of deliberations in a month-long trial.

In February 2009, four years after the crash, the Brassingtons were arrested at their homes in Fort Lauderdale along with three other Platinum Jet executives and a pilot. Another pilot, who was in control of the plane when it crashed, was later indicted and is awaiting trial in Florida.

During the Brassingtons trial, Assistant U.S. Attorneys Scott McBride and J. Fortier Imbert accused the brothers of operating a rogue charter service that regularly put their rich and famous passengers at risk in order to save money by dangerously over-fueling planes at airports where fuel was cheap. The brothers also were accused of using planes and personnel that were not certified for commercial flights, and falsifying flight logs to conceal violations.

Defense lawyers Michael Salnick and Bruce Reinhart acknowledged some paperwork errors and mislabeling of flights, but argued that their clients never intentionally broke the law.

With a client list that included celebrities like rapper Jay-Z, singer-actress Beyonc, rocker Jon Bon Jovi, basketball star Shaquille ONeal and football legend Joe Montana, the Brassingtons had no incentive to save pennies on discount fuel, their attorneys said. The defense also presented testimony that a mechanical problem led to the crash.

Platinum Jet was founded in August 2000 and flew more than 100 charter flights and collected more than $3 million in revenue over the next 15 months without the required certificate for commercial operations, prosecutors said. It later shared another companys certificate but continued to skirt FAA safety rules and falsify required paperwork, the indictment alleged.

The judge dismissed the charges against one co-defendant, Brian McKenzie, Platinums former director of maintenance, after the government rested, while the charges against John Kimberling, who piloted the ill-fated Teterboro flight, were transferred to Florida for trial because of his health. The other defendants, co-founder and managing member Andre Budhan; director of charters Joseph Singh; and pilot Francis Viera; pleaded guilty to fraud charges before the trial. Budhan and Singh testified for the government.

U.S. District Judge Dennis M. Cavanaugh continued the brothers bail and set sentencing for March 17. Paul Brassington faces up to five years in prison while his brother faces a maximum of 20 years on the aircraft-endangerment charge alone.


E-mail: sampson@northjersey.com



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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #187 on: June 20, 2011, 08:39:56 AM »
I've been saying this for years....
______________________________________

Kelly: Its time to ban jets at Teterboro

Monday, June 20, 2011
By MIKE KELLY
RECORD COLUMNIST

Maybe it's just a sign of the times.

Maybe it's the sound and lack of fury at our times.

The muscular jets at tiny Teterboro Airport have become so noisy that our federal government is setting aside money in its already debt-ridden budget to soundproof a nearby school.

The price tag for this fancy earplug for Henry P. Becton Regional High School in East Rutherford is $18 million.

This is supposed to be a good thing.

Really?

When Becton Regional was built in 1971, the designers and school officials knew they were placing a high school within a mile of an airport. What they didn't know is how Teterboro would change bloating itself from a dinky airport that served mostly single-engine, propeller-driven planes to a dinky airport where noisy corporate jets have shoe-horned themselves onto the tarmac.

The result is a dangerous prescription. Even some officials at the Port Authority, which runs Teterboro, concede privately that they worry about the possibility of one of those jets crashing into a residential neighborhood near the airport.

And now we're soundproofing a high school to block out the noise an example of a massive Band-Aid if ever there was one.

The real question is not the noise from the jets. It's the lack of noise from leaders in demanding that Teterboro be shut down or at least forced to ban all jets.

Plenty of political figures as diverse as former Bogota Mayor Steve Lonegan, the conservative Republican, and Rep. Steve Rothman, the Fair Lawn Democrat, have sounded off about how Teterboro has grown too large for its cramped neighborhood. But that criticism rises, then falls like the passing of a jet. The bottom line is that little has changed over the years.

Corporate jets still line up each morning on the Teterboro runways, screaming over the close-knit working class neighborhoods of Hackensack. Other jets float into Teterboro all day, lining up their landing patterns over New

Milford, Teaneck, Bogota and Hackensack flying even lower over those towns when the clouds are low. Indeed, the sight of a corporate jet approaching Teterboro while passing by the upper floors of Hackensack University Medical Center should be enough evidence that something is wrong with how the airport is used.

Pilots are little help. Privately, many tell me that Teterboro is dangerous a land-locked equivalent of trying to land a jet on a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier. But few pilots dare to speak publicly. for fear of being ostracized by their fly-boy buddies. They also fear that federal regulators will further restrict where they fly in the New York City region. Sadly, many pilots still view flying in the 21st century in the same way cowboys saw the West in the 1800s as one big open space.

Flying is generally safe. The statistics support that. But when it comes to Teterboro, statistics need to be balanced by common sense. And common sense dictates that Teterboro ought to ban jets. The airport is simply too small and the surrounding landscape is too crowded.

Which brings us back to the $18 million appropriated to soundproof Becton Regional High School.

Rothman, along with New Jersey's Democratic U.S. senators, Bob Menendez and Frank Lautenberg, joined hands and uttered virtually the same words to praise the decision by the Federal Aviation Administration's Airport Improvement Program to award the money.

"Learning is hard enough without the roar of jet engines overhead," Rothman said in one statement. "High school is hard enough without the sound of airplanes buzzing overhead," Menendez said. "Students and teachers shouldn't have to compete with the roar of jet engines overhead," Lautenberg said.

The operative word here is "overhead." And shouldn't that tell us something?

The problem is overhead in the skies, with noisy jets. And yet, government's solution is to soundproof a school.

Actually, soundproofing is a fancy way to describe the fact that Becton Regional will upgrade its air conditioning and heating systems and install new windows and doors. What's more, Becton is not the first school to receive these upgrades.

Several other schools around Teterboro have received some sort of soundproofing most of it paid for by federal grants. Over the past 25 years, the Port Authority has spent more than $350 million on soundproofing projects near airports in New York City and in New Jersey.

The problem is that not everyone gets to enjoy a noise-free life. Yes, it's important to reduce interruptions of children's schooling. But what about the rest of us?

For years, some judges at the Bergen County Courthouse routinely instructed witnesses to stop speaking when jets passed overhead so jurors would not be confused by what they heard. Indeed, the TV mini-series about the 1980s Baby M case featured a brief scene in which the judge halted testimony in a Hackensack courtroom so a jet could pass.

In 2003, a meeting of the Carlstadt-East Rutherford Regional School Board had to be halted several times because of Teterboro jets. "Over the years, everyone has learned to live with it," a school official announced that night.

Maybe so. Or maybe everyone just endures the nonsense from Teterboro. It's the Jersey way.

We put up with the noise and the eyesore of an airport designed for a time that has long since passed. We're left to soundproof our schools so our kids can learn math and chemistry.

When will the rest of us learn how crazy this is?

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #188 on: December 20, 2011, 02:11:13 PM »
5 die in small-plane crash on NJ highway
By SAMANTHA HENRY | AP 57 mins ago [December 20, 2011]

HARDING, N.J. (AP) Five people died when a small plane headed for Georgia crashed on one of the New York City area's busiest highways.

Authorities say they were three adults and two children. It wasn't clear whether they were a family.

Witnesses told the FAA the single-engine appeared to break up as it spiraled into the wooden median strip and exploded on Interstate 287 in Harding, N.J.

FAA spokesman Jim Peters says the plane had taken off from Teterboro Airport and was headed for DeKalb Peachtree Airport near Atlanta.

Peters says there was a garbled transmission from the plane before it dropped off the radar.

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #189 on: August 09, 2013, 02:17:33 PM »
2 children, pilot missing in Connecticut plane crash
Friday, August 9, 2013    Last updated: Friday August 9, 2013, 1:58 PM
BY  ALLISON PRIES AND SHAWN BOBURG
STAFF WRITERS
The Record

Three people are missing after a prop plane that took off from Teterboro Airport crashed between two houses, setting them both on fire, as it approached a Connecticut airport.


A prop plane flying out of Teterboro crashed in Connecticut.
WTNH NEWS 8

The Rockwell International Turbo Commander 690B, a multi-engine turbo prop aircraft, crashed on approach into the Tweed New Haven Airport in Conn. at 11:25 a.m., a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The 11-seat plane had only a pilot onboard, airport officials said. The pilot and two children ages 13 and 1, who were inside their Charter Oak Avenue in East Haven home have not been recovered from the scene, officials said.

The mother of the two children was able to get out of the house, East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo said. No one was home in the other house at the time of the crash.

Its total devastation, Maturo said, describing the back of the home.

A neighbor, David Esposito, said he heard a loud noise and then a thump. "No engine noise, nothing," he said.

"A woman was screaming her kids were in there," he said.

Esposito said he ran into the upstairs of the house, where the woman believed her children were, but they could not find them. They returned downstairs to search but he dragged the woman out when the flames became too strong.

The aircraft is registered to Ellumax Leasing, LLC of Medina, Wash. It was scheduled to depart at 10 a.m. Friday from the Port Authority-operated airport, according to flight records. But a Tweed Airport representative said it did not take off until 10:49 a.m.

A woman who answered the phone at Ellumax Friday afternoon declined to comment and hung up.

The plane was not based in Teterboro. It was transient, meaning it was passing through. It traveled to Teterboro Wednesday evening from Maryland, according to an aviation official.

The 12,500-pound aircraft refueled and departed from a terminal Friday morning that is operated by Meridian, a full-service private aviation company that services charter planes.

The refueling truck has been sequestered standard procedure in such cases, the aviation official said. It will not service any other aircraft until investigators have a better idea of what caused the crash, he said.   

Tweed's airport manager, Lori Hoffman-Soares, said the twin commander was on instrument panel as it approached the airport. The plane was in communication with the tower until the crash and there were no distress calls, she said.

Hoffman-Soares said they believe the plane missed the approach.

This article contains material from The Associated Press.

Email: priesa@northjersey.com and boburg@northjersey.com

- See more at: http://www.northjersey.com/news/transportation/Plane_crash_in_Connecticut_originated_from_Teterboro.html?page=all#sthash.vEWkyfBj.dpuf
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The plane:


Look at the flight path below.  Was this a solo-pilot joy ride?
« Last Edit: August 09, 2013, 02:23:33 PM by Editor »

Offline Editor

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #190 on: October 22, 2013, 12:19:50 AM »
Plane skids off runway at Teterboro after landing gear collapses, police say
Steve Strunsky/The Star-Ledger  By  Steve Strunsky/The Star-Ledger   
on October 21, 2013 at 5:55 PM


Police said the rear landing gear of a single-engine plane appeared to have collapsed after the plane touched down this afternoon at Teterboro Airport, pictured here in 2010. John O'Boyle/Star-Ledger file photo

TETERBORO Police say the rear landing gear of a small plane collapsed after the craft touched down at Teterboro Airport this afternoon, causing the plane to skid off the runway onto a grassy median.

The pilot, who was the only person on board, declined medical treatment, and police said no one else was hurt in the incident.

The single-engine aircraft landed at about 2 p.m., said Joe Pentangelo, a spokesman for the Port Authority Police Department.

The Federal Aviation Administration was sending an investigator to the scene, Pentangelo said.

 An initial police report of the landing suggested the plane's gear had not deployed. But Pentangelo said a subsequent report indicated that the landing gear did deploy, but collapsed after the plane touched down, and the plane came to rest on its belly.

Pentangelo said there were still no details about why the gear did not deploy, the extent of the damage to the plane, where it had taken off from or where it was headed.

Teterboro is a general aviation airport in Bergen County owned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. It is frequently used by business travelers headed to and from Manhattan, and by recreational pilots.

Aviation records indicate the aircraft is a Lancair, an amateur-built kit plane registered to Aviation Paw Inc., of Dover, DE, which has no published phone number.

According to flightaware.com, an aviation tracking site, the plane took off from Sioux Falls, SD, this morning at 8:09 a.m., before making a stop in Gary, IN, and then flying on to Teterboro at 12:40 p.m.

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Teterboro Meeting Tonight
« Reply #191 on: October 15, 2015, 12:23:01 PM »
THE PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK & NEW JERSEY
 NOTICE OF PUBLIC INFORMATION WORKSHOP
 14 CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATION (CFR) PART 150 AIRPORT NOISE COMPATIBILITY STUDY
 FOR TETERBORO AIRPORT

 The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey will be hosting a public information workshop in October 2015 to provide information regarding the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 150 (14 CFR Part 150) Airport Noise Compatibility Study for Teterboro (TEB) Airport. The workshop will include guided displays that will present information regarding the 14 CFR Part 150 Study process, the project schedule, noise metrics, and methods used to quantify aircraft noise exposure. A second public information workshop will be conducted for the TEB noise study in the Spring of 2016 to provide information regarding the first essential products of the 14 CFR Part 150 Study
the 2016 and 2021 Noise Exposure Maps for TEB.

 The workshop will be held in an open house format from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the date listed below. No formal presentation will be given in order to provide the public with the maximum opportunity for one-on-one interaction and sharing of information and concerns. You may attend the workshop at any time during the two-hour open
 house.

TEB Public Information Workshop
 DATE: Thursday, October 15, 2015
 TIME: 6:00PM-8:00PM
 LOCATION: Holiday Inn Hasbrouck Heights
 283 Route 17 South, Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 07604

 The Part 150 public information workshop is accessible to people who are mobility impaired. Interpretation services are available upon advance request. To make arrangements for such services please contact the Noise Office at (212)435-3880 or via email at NJPART150@panynj.gov no later than (3) days before the workshop for
 which the services are being requested.

Offline Editor

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #192 on: March 08, 2016, 10:33:52 PM »
http://www.northjersey.com/news/faa-testing-new-flight-path-to-teterboro-airport-1.1524552

The Federal Aviation Administration announced Tuesday afternoon that it will begin testing a new flight path to Teterboro Airport that will divert aircraft that usually fly over Hackensack to a route a few miles west that follows the heavily traveled state highway.

The FAA said the test, which will begin on April 4 and last no more than six months, would "provide noise relief for the Hackensack University Medical Center area."
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 10:37:10 PM by Editor »

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Re: Teterboro Airport
« Reply #193 on: March 14, 2016, 08:28:28 AM »
this is very good news for the quality of life in Hackensack.

I saw on TV people from Mahwah, 20 miles away, protesting this change because THEY will be under the new flight path. What was missing from that newscast was information on how high the planes are in Mahwah while approaching Teterboro, and how long they are in Hackensack, which is so close to the airport.  Therefore the complaints are not comparable.

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anything