Author Topic: HURRICANE IRENE  (Read 21386 times)

Offline Editor

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Re: HURRICANE IRENE (Videos)
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2011, 10:15:50 AM »
YouTube Description: Heavy swift water taking over Main Street just off Rt. 4.


YouTube Description: Coles Brook Meets Irene - Hackensack/River Edge


YouTube Description: Fishing on streets of Hackensack , NJ after hurricane Irene.


YouTube Description: Flood from Hurricane Irene under the CSX railroad bridge at RIver Road in Hackensack, NJ on August 28th ,2011. Note the car on the right.


YouTube Description: Engine 5 responding to assist homeowner in flood zone.


YouTube Description: [This is Court Plaza, 25 Main St. ] This is the P1 level of the parking garage in the building where I work. It's still wet but pretty much dried out. Lots of mud and dirt on the ground. The elevators are OUT, the shafts no doubt filled with plenty of water. I took this video around 5:40 a.m. No one around. The building is still closed as of today.


YouTube Description: hurricane iren aftermath in hackensack nj
« Last Edit: August 30, 2011, 10:33:52 AM by Editor »

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Re: IRENE (more videos)
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2011, 11:33:33 AM »
YouTube Description: [Near Hudson Street]. The morning after the storm. wading into the street while conversing with neighbors


YouTube Description: [Part 1] Some quick shots of flooding from where the local stream, usually less than 6" deep and around 8-10' down, jumped its banks and flooded most of north Hackensack NJ around Route 4.


YouTube Description [Part 2] Some quick shots of flooding from where the local stream, usually less than 6" deep and around 8-10' down, jumped its banks and flooded most of north Hackensack NJ around Route 4.


YouTube Description:[Near Johnson/Jefferson]. Irene flooding in Hackensack, New Jersey.


YouTube: [In and around Foschini Park]


YouTube Description: [Temple Avenue] Hurricane Irene - Hackensack, NJ Fairmount Park: flooding aftermath


YouTube Description: Effect of Hurricane Irene in our street and in our neighborhood. Storm surge came up till Hackensack on the Hackensack river and flooded our city. Hopefully, with no additional rain, this water will drain quick and not reach our home. Thank GOD.


YouTube Description: Hackensack NJ in the wake of Irene.

« Last Edit: August 30, 2011, 11:36:06 AM by Editor »

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Re: HURRICANE IRENE
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2011, 08:40:29 AM »
Hackensack recovers from Hurricane Irene
Tuesday, August 30, 2011
BY MARK J. BONAMO
MANAGING EDITOR
Hackensack Chronicle

Power outages and flooding were left in Hurricane Irene's wake after the weekend storm rolled through Hackensack and the rest of North Jersey.


PHOTO BY TOM HART
River Road, behind Toyota of Hackensack, certainly lived up to its name on Sunday. Large portions of the road were under water as a result of Hurricane Irene.



PHOTO BY TOM HART
Johnson Park in Hackensack seems more like a lake on Sunday, as this local resident uses the opportunity to take a swim.


While coastal flooding was not as extensive as predicted, considerable inland flooding contributed to damage that could add up to more than $1 billion statewide, according to Governor Christie.

Hackensack Fire Department spokesman Lt. Stephen Lindner noted that firefighters went from "one emergency to another" during the storm, especially in northern, eastern and southeastern sections of the city that are prone to flooding.

"The Hackensack River is tidal, and it was high tide around 9 a.m. on Sunday," said Lindner, who noted that two extra shifts of firefighters using three rescue boats came to the aid of approximately 100 residents trapped in apartments and houses as well as about 100 people stuck in cars.

"It was just a prefect storm for flooding," he said.

Approximately 500 people evacuated the city, with around 100 people seeking temporary shelter in the Hackensack Civic Center. Two small fires and numerous gas leaks kept public safety officials busy over the weekend.

"People have to know that they shouldn't be driving around during something like this," Lindner said, nothing that a section of Lodi Street between Green Street and Polifly Road remained under water as of Monday morning. "It's common sense."

For Stephanie Hellpap and her family on Ross Avenue in the Fairmount section, there wasn't much choice but to stay put.

"You could surf down the block," said Hellpap. "We had about three to four inches of water in the basement, and our power was out for a while on Sunday and early Monday."

While many locals questioned if the hurricane and its effects were somehow overhyped, Hellpap thought it was better that more was said about the possible effects of the storm rather than not enough.

"I expected it to be worse, but I'd rather be over-prepared than unprepared," said Hellpap. "I think more people heeded the warnings because they made a big deal about it."

James Erwin, a Jefferson Street resident, did what he felt he had to do well before he saw a car stuck at the flooded corner of his block.

"There was a lot of water flowing, like a hydrant at full blast," said Erwin, whose first-floor apartment remained flood-free. "I took all of the necessary precautions by moving my couch, stereo and pictures out of harm's way. After all, it could have gone the other way."

City Manager Stephen Lo Iacono noted that cleanup and safety efforts continued into Monday. A team of six inspectors examined buildings where mandatory evacuations had taken place, which included the Madison Arms apartments on Kinderkamack Road.

"We have to make sure these buildings are safe before we let people back in them," said Lo Iacono. "Throughout this whole thing, it's better to be safe than sorry."

Email: bonamo@northjersey.com

Offline BLeafe

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Re: HURRICANE IRENE
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2011, 12:52:09 PM »
Despite the turmoil all around.........serenity.

I took this shot of the northern point of Foschini Park at 8:25am on Monday - about an hour and a half before high tide.


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Re: HURRICANE IRENE
« Reply #19 on: September 02, 2011, 09:41:12 AM »
Evacuees simply want to return to their homes
Last updated: Friday September 2, 2011, 7:37 AM
BY ZACH PATBERG
STAFF WRITER
The Record

Mary A. Bierley was watching a "Royal Pains" marathon on the USA Network when fire officials pounded on her door at 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

"You have five minutes to grab your dog and any medication and get on the bus," one official said.

"But I have power," Bierley replied. "I don't want to leave."

She had no choice. The 54-year-old and about 50 other tenants in a Hackensack complex on Hudson Street were among the more than 400 residents swept up in mandatory evacuations throughout the city as the Irene-fed Hackensack River rose to record levels.

After five nights sleeping on a cot at Bergen Community College's makeshift shelter, Bierley was wondering Thursday when she could go home. It's a question on more and more minds these days as the flooding in North Jersey begins to recede and recovery gets under way. Emergency officials have no clear answer, however, and no consistent way of notifying the displaced when the coast is clear.

"That's the dilemma," said an employee at the college who has been volunteering at the shelter there. "These people don't know officially when they can come back."

Thousands of people were evacuated and far more fled on their own from the flood zones in Bergen and Passaic counties after Irene struck. Many remain displaced, stuck in a college gymnasium in Paramus, a high school in Paterson or a civic center in Little Falls. Few have any idea when their homes will be livable again. County and local officials say the first step is for power companies to assess the affected buildings and make repairs. Then, the local building departments can determine whether the properties meet codes.

"We're at the mercy of Public Service [PSE&G], and I know they're swamped," said Stephen Lo Iacono, Hackensack's city manager.

In Paterson, where more than 4,000 people were displaced, police Sgt. Alex Popov said the Riverview Towers and homes along East Main Street had not yet had water pumped from their basements, gas and electric turned on or an engineering survey of structural integrity. He hopes residents can start to return to their houses and apartments by the weekend.

"Once the buildings are deemed safe, residents can come back," Popov said.

Many others have gone home. The number of people in Paterson's shelters was down to 200 Thursday from a high of 1,500. Bergen Community College, once filled with hundreds of the suddenly homeless, hosted about 80.

But for those still waiting, any good news will likely travel slowly and from all directions. John Niland, Hackensack's emergency management coordinator, said that "unfortunately, at this point" people will have to contact their local building departments or landlords to see whether they can return home.

Popov said officers at Paterson's shelters will spread the news. Passaic County's office of emergency management recommended the displaced call their local OEMs. And while some command centers have Reverse 911 systems in place, officials elsewhere are relying on word of mouth

"Everyone's got everyone else's cellphone, so neighbors can call neighbors to say, 'Come back in,' " Passaic County Freeholder Edward O'Connell said.

Meanwhile, anyone attempting to return home without permission will be removed and possibly fined. Bierley and her neighbor went to their second- and third-floor apartments Thursday only to find fluorescent-orange signs, warning of a $1,000 fine for anyone entering the still-uninhabitable building. Yet some landlords have been encouraging tenants to return. One began ushering residents into a Hackensack apartment complex on North Main Street on Wednesday, Lo Iacono said. Police were called, and the tenants were removed.

Bierley said she was told by her landlord that she had to return. Other tenants had. And her rent was due. But Bierley stayed put Thursday, setting a new sack of groceries down on one cot among hundreds in the vast college gymnasium.

E-mail: patberg@northjersey.com

Offline BLeafe

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Re: HURRICANE IRENE
« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2011, 06:33:40 PM »
This is the last of the Hurricane Irene photos.

The first one is a stitch of 8 images that shows the first clearing from midtown Manhattan to Prospect Ave (click to enlarge).

The second shows the storm exiting as the sun shines on Treeneck.

The last one shows Irene's fire-sky sunset.


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Re: HURRICANE IRENE
« Reply #21 on: September 08, 2011, 04:45:58 PM »
Some residents still displaced from apartments in Hackensack
Posted on September 8, 2011 2:46 pm
by Monsy Alvarado
 
The recent rainfall has not caused more evacuations in the city, but some dwellings still remain empty because of damage caused during Hurricane Irene, city officials said Thursday.

About 20 first floor units at the Madison Arm Apartments complex, as well as a number of apartments along Hudson Street remain unoccupied until electric repairs, or water damage is fixed, said John Greenwood, building sub-code official. He could not say how many units were still impacted, but said repair work is being completed in some places and residents are being allowed back in once city officials approve the work.

He said tenants should keep in touch with their landlord to find out the status of the repairs at the different buildings.
 
City Manager Stephen Lo Iacono said as of Tuesday about 70 families were still displaced, including seven people who were staying at the emergency shelter set up at Bergen Community College.
 
He said the rainfall earlier in the week has caused some street flooding in the usual areas, including along Newman and Green streets.

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Re: HURRICANE IRENE
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2011, 08:56:03 AM »
Hackensack Residents Still Under Water Weeks After Iren
By ERICA PITZIPIX11.COM
5:37 p.m. EDT, September 16, 2011

[VIDEO REMOVED BY CONTENT OWNER]

The overflowing river forced folks living on the ground level at 340 Hudson Street out of their homes weeks ago.
 
Henry Spencer had lived in his apartment for 14 years before Irene came knocking.
 
"I came into my living room, water was coming through the door and that was it, i grabbed everything I could, shoes, pants and I ran out," said Spencer.
 
His neighbor Carol Broadnax couldn't believe how fast her home flooded either.
 
"Water came through my windows, next thing I know, water is up to my waist.  I thought my cat died.  And I'm up there walking in this water, yelling, 'Help! Help!'," remembered Broadnax.
 
Three Weeks later, residents are still digging up debris in and around their homes and salvaging what they can.
 
Spencer showed us his only possession untouched by the water: a record collection.
 
But he lost all of his furniture and so did Broadnax.
 
"I lost pretty much everything and there's other stuff I'm not even going to take because mold has set in," said Broadnax.
 
For both of them, the idea of moving is tough to take after living here so long.
 
"I was here 12 years. I just can't believe this used to be my home, once upon a time," said Broadnax as tears built up in her eyes.
 
Inside the ground floor apartments, you can see dry wall torn up With how gutted these ground floor apartments are, it's no surprise the building department has deemed them unsafe.
 
Property management has to repair the electric panels and replace the dry wall, carpet and appliances.
 
It could be weeks possibly even more than a month before residents will be allowed back in their homes.
 
Fortunately, FEMA has the funds to help these folks.  Red Cross has done a lot too
 
Plus, many have family nearby to give them shelter until they find their own.
 
That includes Broadnax's furry friend who survived the storm.
 
"As long as she's okay, I'll make out," said Broadnax clutching her kitty, adding, "This is my sweetheart right here. I love her."
« Last Edit: July 24, 2012, 02:18:11 PM by Editor »

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Re: HURRICANE IRENE
« Reply #23 on: September 19, 2011, 09:00:04 AM »
Historic Floods of the Hackensack Valley
Posted on September 14, 2011 at 2:25pm
Teaneck Patch 
By Kevin Wright2011

Superseding a low timber-crib dam installed above Veldrans Mill in 1912, the Hackensack Water Company built a concrete dam, 22 feet high, in 1921 to vastly increase its storage capacity, impounding the Oradell Reservoir as we know it today. Therefore, historically recounting back-to-back episodes of century-high floods in 1902 and 1903 can tell us what conditions along the Hackensack River during heavy storms were like previous to the influence of the extant dam.

Heavy rains and melting snow caused severe flooding in the Hackensack and Passaic valleys on February 28, 1902. The Hackensack River rose far above its high-water mark, doing incalculable damage to dwellings and businesses along its banks. Roads and bridges suffered many thousands of dollars worth of damage. Several feet of water submerged roads leading to New Milford Depot on New Milford Avenue in Oradell and commuters resorted to rowboats to reach the station. Huge cakes of ice floated downstream and piled nearly thirty feet high against the county bridge spanning the river near New Milford. Fearing the bridge would give way under the enormous strain, G. F. Mack, acting under instructions from the County Board of Chosen Freeholders, assembled a force of men in the afternoon to blow up the ice jam with dynamite. In the lower section of Peetzburgh, houses along Hirshfield Brook suffered greatly as water reached a height of nearly six feet. The old blacksmith shop was nearly submerged as floodwaters reached a height of nearly ten feet in that neighborhood. Merchants Cooper & Demarest lost several hundred dollars worth of lumber, stored along the riverbank, when it was swept downstream. Nearly five feet of floodwater imprisoned two horses in Cooper & Demarests barn. In attempting their rescue, two employees, Charles Streiter and Samuel Cosney, narrowly escaped drowning when their boat capsized, but Peter Cosney saved the animals by constructing a large raft, which carried them to safety. Floodwaters also drowned the engine room of the Hackensack Water Company, rising to a point within a few inches of the furnaces. Several feet of water inundated thousands of bushels of grain stored on the lower and first floor of William Veldran & Sons gristmill at Oradell. The bridge at River Edge Avenue was slightly damaged, while the approach roads were inundated to a depth of four feet, tearing away macadam and flooding cellars in that vicinity. Several flocks of wild ducks were seen along the Hackensack River and scores of muskrats were driven from their underground haunts along Bergen County streams with many falling victims to enterprising huntersOne young man reportedly shot fifty-two muskrats and sold their skins for 16 a piece.

Along the Passaic River, the flood of February 28, 1902, was the worst that Rutherford suffered since 1854 and 1883that of 1854 reportedly being worse than 1883. In 1902, the Passaic River rose about a foot higher than it did in 1854.

The joint Boards of Health of Rutherford, East Rutherford and Carlstadt met at City Hall on July 29, 1902, to hear the report of Doctors Calhoun and Ogden on their inspection of the Hackensack watershed above the New Milford Pumping Station. Dr. Ogden provided the following oral report, reproduced in an article entitled, Bad Condition of the Hackensack Water, published in The Bergen County Democrat on August 1, 1902:

Commencing at New Milford and going north four or five miles they found a number of [water] closets which were contaminating the water, and which the company had promised to have remedied. About a mile above they found other closets where there was an Italian colony [of workers]. The stables of the Italians were filthy and the contents were emptying into the river. Just above this there was another closet about twenty feet from the bank on the hill, and again further on a stable near the banks some 300 feet long, the ground around it being soft and filthy from the deposits of manure, and this also deposited in the river. They stated that they had gone over only a small portion of the territory and found the same conditions prevailing. They then visited the companys works at New Milford, saw Superintendent French who seemed to be cognizant of these facts, and who stated that he would look into these matters. The reservoir, it was stated, was cleaned once a year generally, but some of the people did not agree with this view. Dr. Calhoun stated to Mr. French that there was one closet on the companys property, which was used by ten people. Mr. French at first denied this but afterwards admitted it. The doctor also offered to go over the ground with him at any time and show him the nuisances spoken of. At one place a boathouse had been removed, but the bank had not been cleaned yet. Washing of clothes by Italians on the banks was common and the dirty water let run into the river, and the conditions now were the same as a year ago. The doctor stated that the company was building a new reservoir above New Milford, which would help in the case, but the people could not wait for this and something must be done at once. Dr. Sickenberger sent in a written report of the examination of the water in the old reservoir, which showed numerous deposits but no organic matter, but the water in the new reservoir was dirty, and this should be cleaned out as the water was not fit to be used. In the discussion that followed, Dr. Calhoun maintained that the company should have time to begin the abatement of the nuisance before the Boards should take any action, and if they do not take any action then the Boards should act. The report was received and the committee continued.

Much of historical interest can be gleaned from an article on improvements made to the plant of the Hackensack Water Company, published in The Bergen County Democrat on August 28, 1903:

With the extensive improvements, which are in courses of construction by the Hackensack Water Company both at New Milford and Hillsdale [Woodcliff Lake], it would seem that soon all question as to the purity of the water will be laid aside. Both in Hackensack and in Englewood from time to time rumors are heard of the impurity of the Hackensack water and analysis is frequently made by chemists and physicians of the county. The results of these tests are sometimes made public and cause much concern among the residents.

By the improved filtering plant which the company is having constructed at New Milford, through which every drop of water will pass before being distributed through the mains to the different cities and towns, should satisfy the consumers that the company is doing all in their power to supply water as free from impurities as it is possible to do.

On the north side of the present pumping station a reservoir 260 x 450 feet is being constructed, and, when completed, will hold eighteen feet of water. Nine feet of water will at all times remain in the reservoir, so that the sediment, which will accumulate will not be disturbed. From the reservoir the water will be pumped to the filtering house, which will be erected to the west of the reservoir. The filtering house will be a brick structure, four stories in height, the upper part being used for offices.

Seventy-five men are at present employed on the work, but in the fall the force will be doubled. It will take a year and a half before the work is completed.

Supt. Golden, who is in charge of the work, said: The plant will be one of the finest in the country and will be up-to-date in every detail. When the water passes through the mechanical filter it will be absolutely free from impurities. The plant will be similar to that of the East Jersey Water Co. at Parsippany.

Two chemists will be constantly at the works, whose duty it will be to make analysis before and after the water passes through the filter.

At Hillsdale [actually Woodcliff Lake] a storage reservoir, covering an area of over a mile, is being also constructed. The consulting engineers are Hering & Fuller, of New York; the resident engineers, Wise & Watson, of Rutherford, and the contractor Miles Tierney.


A new eighteen-million-gallon pump began operating at the Water Works on November 10, 1902. Nevertheless, Doctor St John pronounced the water unfit to drink unless boiled in December 1902.

On October 16, 1903, a correspondent for The Bergen Democrat concluded, Not within the memory of the present generation has there been so great a loss and so much inconvenience from floods as during the past ten days. A storm of historic proportions deluged all of the country within 200 miles of New York, severing rail connections with the city for the first time since the Blizzard of 1888 and cutting off mail deliveries for two days. The flow of water was stronger the nearer the rivers came to the ocean as the Passaic and Hackensack Rivers spread out to an extent not thought possiblealmost every town in Bergen County suffered. Towns along the New Jersey & New York Railroad were particularly injured, lying so close to the Hackensack River. It was thought the loss of bridges in Bergen County would require the Board of Chosen Freeholders to immediately provide $150,000 for emergency repairs and replacements. The City of Paterson sustained losses estimated at $1,000,000. The water there rose three feet higher than it had ever been known to do and a portion of the city remained under water for several days. Wallington, opposite Passaic, was almost wiped off the map for several days. Lodi, with its mills, also suffered severely. At New Milford, flood tides on Friday, October 9, 1903, and again on Saturday, reached a depth of eight feet in places, doing considerable damage. The plant of the Hackensack Water Company was closed for several days, while work on the reservoir (then under construction) was abandoned. Copper & Demarests lumber sheds were wrecked and nearly $1,000 worth of lumber floated away. The dam at the button factory on the Meister farm gave way, flooding the building and undermining its foundations. At River Edge, the flood struck the house of the Canoe Club and the piano was found floating around the building. Roads and property in the vicinity of the river were inundated to the depth of several feet on Friday and Saturday. The bridge east of the River Edge depot successfully withstood the flood, though it had been considerably damaged when a big scow, owned by Cooper & Demarest, of New Milford, broke from its moorings, came downstream and struck its west end. Freeholder A. Z. Bogert and Mr. Bloomer, whose yards bordered the river, were heavy losers as the flood carried lumber, cordwood and coal downstream. Bloomer Brothers lost their stock of cordwood and their shed. The old Bloomer homestead on River Edge Avenue was flooded up to the first floor. Bordering the river on the west side of the bridge, A. Z. Bogert lost a quantity of lime, plaster, building material and fertilizer. Although the railroad tracks were submerged in places and landslides caused hundreds of tons of earth to be deposited on the tracks, service to Spring Valley, New York, was restored on Monday, October 12th. At New Bridge, water overflowed the riverbanks and spread across the country to rising ground. It flooded many housesone to two or more feet deep on the first floorcausing considerable loss of provisions kept in cellars as well as to furniture. Business at Kaufmans New Bridge Hotel was entirely suspended as the barroom and all floors even with it were submerged. The owners saved their piano by standing it on soapboxes; they stored their stock of spirits on high shelves.  Midland Township clerk Herbert Howland nearly drowned when he tried to save the Howland Avenue Bridge.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2011, 09:02:36 AM by Editor »

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Re: HURRICANE IRENE
« Reply #24 on: July 24, 2012, 02:20:06 PM »

YouTube Description: Hackensack vs Irene 8/28/2011. From Rt 4 to Hudson St and everywhere in between, Irene won.

 

anything