Author Topic: Quality of food in the public schools  (Read 4217 times)

Offline Victor E Sasson

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Quality of food in the public schools
« on: February 24, 2013, 05:37:35 pm »
My stepson is 15 and attends Hackensack High School. He hates the food there, and often doesn't have lunch, even though he has a lot of money in his account. On Friday, I saw some kids at Starbucks on Essex Street in Hackensack, asked where they went school, and was told Hackensack High. I said it seemed like a long walk for something to eat, and one of the kids said he never eats lunch there. My stepson says a lot of kids walk to the Dunkin' Donuts on Passaic Street for lunch. A pizzeria near the high school does a land-office business.

I encountered a candidate for the school board on Saturday night, mentioned kids' view of the food at the high school, and he said two things: there are lots of high schools with bad food, and Hackensack High had more serious problems. He's not getting my vote. I met another candidate for the school board today, and she reacted positively to my concern.

Why would anyone minimize the importance of food in schools? What else has a direct relationship to your health and feeling of well-being?

Hackensack doesn't spend millions of dollars every year on school busing. Where is that money going? Certainly not for good food the kids want to eat.



Offline regina

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2013, 06:06:57 pm »
You are probably right about the food. Not many kids are thrilled with school lunch offerings. I do not know any who are happy with the high school's offerings.

I saw this on BOE minutes. I do not know if it refers to school lunch menu. Maybe you can check with BOE.
"Superintendent made the following comments:
Appointment of a board member is needed for the menu committee Dr. Carrion was selected"

Our son has tree nut allergies and is vegetarian. He also only has 1/2 a lunch period Monday thru Thursday because of AP classes. We send a healthy lunch with him 4 days a week (salad or vegetarian sandwich with fruit & real juice). He does not even go into the cafeteria because it is too crowded. On Friday he finds someplace to buy rice and beans. Maybe packing a lunch is a good option for you until the menu gets improved.

Offline dbl bugle

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2013, 09:14:27 pm »
Well imho a 15 year old boy who doesn't care for the food that is offered in a school lunch program also has the option of bringing a lunch to school that he would enjoy, no?

Offline irons35

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2013, 10:19:56 pm »
thank the federal government and their rules on nutrition for the food in the schools.  as long as its "healthy" taste doesn't come into the equation. 

Offline just watching

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2013, 07:12:16 am »
Let's see what Dr. Carrion comes up with, hopefully it's not carrion.

Offline Victor E Sasson

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2013, 11:12:45 am »
Yes. The second board candidate I encountered mentioned the menu review. Of course, the lunches cost $2.40, so I guess I shouldn't expect too much. We've tried to get our son to take lunch to school but he just refuses. I guess he likes to complain about it. I am going to force the issue when his account is empty. I would like to see vegetable gardens started at all the schools. After all, Michelle Obama started her "Let's Move" program a few years ago, but I guess it hasn't filtered down to Hackensack.

Offline regina

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2013, 06:05:45 pm »
Sounds like your stepson may be angling to go off campus for lunch. I do not like the idea, but it has to be permitted because the lunchroom is so small that it cannot accommodate every child for every lunch period. Even if they staggered them from first to last period there is no way every child could fit in that room. Our system works for us and we keep "emergency money" on his account in case he ever needs to pick up a pizza meal at school-that is the only thing he will eat there.

Offline Victor E Sasson

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2013, 02:52:52 pm »
Regina, we can always count on you to defend the status quo.

Offline Editor

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2013, 03:16:04 pm »
I know nothing about this issue but it seemed Regina was providing some useful information.

Offline Victor E Sasson

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2013, 10:11:06 am »
Most of the kids I've spoken to do not mention the size of the lunchroom; they say the food stinks, period. One I saw at Starbucks yesterday said he tried the lunch "once," and never went back.

Offline regina

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Re: Quality of food in the public schools
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2013, 01:43:33 pm »
I do not believe I defended any status quo. I agreed with you about the food, added crowded lunchroom as another dimension and told you how we deal with the same problem. Our son gets a healthy lunch everyday, which is the most important part to us. We take that as OUR responsibility, not the schools. Apparently the kids who are eating in the lunchroom do not object to the point where they refuse to buy the food. We found an alternative that works for us, it may not work for all.