Author Topic: Education/Charter Schools/Testing  (Read 54477 times)

Offline Editor

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Hackensack Schools Budget
« Reply #60 on: March 09, 2010, 07:16:12 PM »
Hackensack has concerns about upcoming education cuts
Friday, March 5, 2010
BY MARK J. BONAMO
Hackensack Chronicle
MANAGING EDITOR

When Governor Christie addressed both houses of the state Legislature in a major budget speech on Feb. 11, he had just signed an executive order that froze $1.6 billion in state aid as part of a plan to close a $2.2 billion budget gap. The freeze included withholding $475 million in state aid to local school districts with budget surpluses. The move will compel these districts to spend their surpluses and reserve funds to make up the shortfall. It will affect 500 districts for the remainder of the fiscal year.

Proclaiming New Jersey to be on "the edge of bankruptcy," Christie explained his rationale for the cuts to the joint legislative session with a mix of pragmatism and defiance.

"We have not reduced school aid with an axe, we have done it with a scalpel and with great care," said Christie. "Now is the time when we all must resist the traditional, selfish call to protect your own turf at the cost of our state."

"We chose to confront the problem head on by reforming our spending habits and laying the groundwork for reform," added Christie. "We have set out in a new direction, a direction dictated by the votes of the people of New Jersey, and I do not intend to turn back."

If anything, Christie forged further ahead with his budget cutting campaign on Feb. 17 when he announced that he has asked school districts to prepare for a 15 percent reduction in state aid for the budget year that begins in July, a plan meant to help address a potential $11 billion deficit in the next fiscal year. With the total formula of aid to schools currently standing at approximately $7.5 billion according to the state Department of Education, a 15 percent cut would equal nearly $1.1 billion.

Whether Christies radical cost-cutting moves constitute needed surgery, or will leave the states schools dead on the table, can be debated. Either way, Hackensacks schools wont be spared the knife.

The effect of education cuts for Hackensack

The effect of the funding freeze for the rest of the fiscal year on Hackensack is considerable. According to the Governors Office, the total state aid expected by Hackensack was $13,157,589. As a result of the freeze, the total state aid to be withheld adds up to $3,572,199.

Hackensack Schools Superintendent Dr. Edward Kliszus stated that his district wont be able to get a full grip on next years state aid numbers until Gov. Christie addresses the fiscal 2011 budget gap on March 16, but had a rough idea of what Christies proposed state aid cuts might mean.

"Any cut in state aid is consequential, because schools are about kids and teachers," Kliszus said, pointing out that Hackensack had a $61.2 million district budget last year, with state aid making up $14 million, or approximately 23 percent of the total. The proposed 15 percent reduction in aid for the next fiscal year would amount to $2.1 million.

While the proposed cuts have some educators worried about issues such as teacher layoffs, Kliszus looked at some more short-term effects.

"Whenever the state decides to cut funding, ultimately the programs that are not mandated become targeted if there have to be cuts," Kliszus said. "A lot of things are not mandated. Athletics are not mandated. Class sizes are not mandated. Music and art are not mandated. You dont have to have summer school or after-school programs. None of those are mandated. Those are the ones that take the hits. In these situations, I show the board a list of all the non-mandated programs, and well have to go from there."

Battle between teachers union and Christie expected

Conflict between the Republican Christie and the Democratic-leaning New Jersey Educational Association, the long-powerful teachers union, is anticipated in the wake of the current and proposed cuts in aid to schools. While the size of teacher contracts and their pensions will continue to generate controversy, Kliszus questioned the recent framework of the debate about educational issues in the state.

"The reason that the governor is able to do as much as hes doing so quickly is because hes using executive orders," said Kliszus, a reference to the fact that Christie has issued 15 executive orders since taking office on Jan. 19. "I think that there is a point where hes going to have to work with the legislature, including those who are sensitive to the needs of unions around the state, and work with the legislative process."

"Right now, there is no democracy until we have legislative action," added Kliszus. "When that happens, I think that there will be more measured actions rather than the emergency actions that we have right now."

E-mail: bonamo@northjersey.com

Offline just watching

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #61 on: March 12, 2010, 08:08:11 PM »

Looks like the percent of the school budget subsidized  by the State is now up to 23%.  It never used to be that high.  This reflects negatively on Hackensack.  The best districts have almost no state aid, and the inner cities are often 75% - 90% subsidized.

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #62 on: August 25, 2010, 09:57:05 AM »
Hackensack Board of Education rehires administrative staff
Wednesday, August 25, 2010
BY MONSY ALVARADO
The Record
STAFF WRITER

Related story: http://www.northjersey.com/news/101425329_Schools_chief_is_under_fire.html

HACKENSACK The Board of Education, in a revote, has appointed an assistant superintendent, a high school principal and assistant principal.

Trustees also voted Monday night to inform Superintendent of Schools Edward Kliszus that his employment will be discussed at the next board meeting.

Board member Clarissa Gilliam Gardner cited the revote and Kliszus' hiring practices as some of the reasons she asked for the motion on his status.

She also said she doesn't like the way Kliszus handled a personnel matter involving a high school teacher.

"I did it because I truly believe that the leadership is terribly ineffective and it needs to change," Gardner said.

Kliszus said Tuesday that Gardner began talking about his employment Monday night without notifying him, which is illegal. He said Gardner has taken exception to most of his recommendations for administrative hires.

"We have a very comprehensive process for school leaders and principals, and those are the standards that are used," Kliszus said.

Kliszus said they also disagreed on who would be laid off when the district had to make staff cuts because of reductions in state aid. He said he considered seniority but that Gardner wanted him to take staff diversity into account.

"I will not hire based on ethnicity," he said. "I will always present the best candidates to the board."

On Monday, the board also reappointed Raymond Gonzalez as an assistant superintendent. James Montesano was named high school principal, and Patricia Aquino was appointed as an assistant principal at the high school.

Trustees Rhonda Williams Bembry and Gardner opposed the appointments of Montesano and Aquino. Bembry also opposed the hiring of Gonzalez.

Bembry said that among the reasons she voted against the appointment is that the candidates didn't answer questions well in an interview.

"Their answers lacked depth and substance," Bembry said.

A revote on Gonzalez, Montesano and Aquino was recommended by board attorney Richard Salkin after some trustees questioned whether the five votes they received at previous meetings were enough for the appointments to be valid.

The Hackensack Board of Education bylaws state that a majority vote of the full membership is required for the appointment of a superintendent, school business administrator and administrative principals.

The board has nine members, but since the Maywood representative gets to vote on the positions, the number of votes needed for the appointments to pass is six. Each received more than six votes on the revote.

Gonzalez, who has worked in Paterson as the assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction, will be paid $160,000 annually in Hackensack.

Montesano, who is the son of retired Superintendent of Schools Joseph Montesano, will receive $156,518 as principal.

Aquino, who has worked in the district since 2002, will receive $142,884.

The school board also hired Gordon Whiting, a former dean at the high school, as assistant principal for the in-school suspension and the alternative high school programs, and for student activities.

The post is a new position at the high school this year, bringing the number of assistant principals at the school to five. Whiting will receive $142,884 in the position.

Bembry opposed creating the new position, saying it will add to the district's already high administrator costs.

She said that instead, the district could have moved an assistant principal from another school, or redistribute the responsibilities of the assistant principals at the high school. She did, however, vote in favor of Whiting getting the job.

Mercedes Abreu-Haines will become the assistant principal at Jackson Avenue School, replacing Celso King, who was appointed last month as an assistant principal at the high school. Abreu-Haines, a bilingual teacher, will get paid $126,042.

E-mail: alvarado@northjersey.com
« Last Edit: August 25, 2010, 10:00:20 AM by Editor »

Offline just watching

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #63 on: August 25, 2010, 03:57:12 PM »


Kliszus needs to be given the right to present the best candidates to the board, not the best candidates that reflect each racial group of teachers.  Politics cannot enter into this. Too much politics has traditionally been the downfall of urban school systems.

The best candidate could be a black teacher, a white teacher, a Latino teacher, and maybe even an Asian teacher.  The "best" candidate has to be someone who has personal knowledge and teaching skills, a kind heart, and should believe that diversity is an asset, not something to be tolerated.  And above all, he or she must believe that all students of all backgrounds can and should learn, and not to expect better performance from some students.  Expect the best from everyone, and you'll get the best.

The racial mix of teachers would be expected to reflect the racial mix of teachers coming out of the Montclair teaching school and other major colleges with teaching programs.  Not the racial mix that is politically demanded by school board members.

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #64 on: September 22, 2010, 09:38:14 AM »
City schools to get $470K in aid
Wednesday, September 22, 2010
BY MARK J. BONAMO
Hackensack Chronicle
Managing Editor

HACKENSACK Hackensack schools will receive $470,169 as part of an infusion of federal aid designed to help replace money cut from local school budgets.

The state Education Department announced Sept. 20 how it plans to allocate nearly $263 million provided to New Jersey last month by Congress with the passage of a bill meant to save education jobs. The money is designated for hiring or saving the jobs of teachers and other school employees. In total, Bergen districts will get just below $8 million from the $10 billion federal Education Jobs Fund. All state school districts will have until September 2012 to spend the funds.

The federal fiscal boost comes at a particularly opportune time for Garden State school districts. With the passage of the 2010-2011 state budget in June, schools will receive $820 million less in state aid this fiscal year. Hackensack's school aid dropped from nearly $14.9 million to close to $10.7 million, an approximately 28.5 percent cut.

These hard fiscal facts led to an especially rancorous budgetary season across New Jersey, with districts dealing with difficult choices as they prepared to allocate diminished funds. Hackensack school staff layoffs were announced in May, with 19 first- and second-year teachers losing their jobs, as well as 34 para-professionals.

The New Jersey Education Association, the state's largest teachers' union, claimed Governor Christie's administration had been slow to apply for the federal funds, affecting districts' abilities to plan for projected funding shortfalls.

Supporters of the Education Jobs Fund, which was attached to the Education Jobs and Medicaid Assistance Act passed by Congress in August, said it would save the jobs of 140,000 teachers throughout the nation. This figure included 3,900 teaching jobs in New Jersey, according to the federal Council of Economic Advisers.

Hackensack Schools Superintendent Dr. Edward Kliszus was uncertain regarding how the city's fund influx would be allocated, including whether the new money would be able to restore any district education jobs in the near future.

"We have nothing from the Department of Education yet on how this is going to work, including when we are going to receive payment. We have to look at the top priorities," Kliszus said, adding that the district was able to re-hire approximately 10 teachers and 15 para-professionals to partially recoup this year's earlier layoff losses. "We are still facing a $4 million hole in next year's budget& as well as the effect of the new statewide 2 percent property tax cap."

In her letter to New Jersey school districts announcing the federal funding allocations, acting Education Commissioner Rochelle Hendricks advised caution when making dispersal decisions.

"With your staff and budget set for the 2010-2011 school year, I urge you to be mindful of how and when these funds are spent," wrote Hendricks. "While record levels of total federal, state and local funding have been made available to schools in recent years, the next budget cycle promises to be challenging. Therefore, please consider reserving this one-time funding for the 2011-2012 school year if possible."

"I encourage your district to avoid spending decisions that would significantly grow future-year obligations that could prove to be unsustainable," added Hendricks. "These one-time funds should not only preserve critical jobs, they should provide your district with the breathing room needed to plan for educationally sound, balanced budgets in the austere days to come. It is unwise to assume that there will be additional streams of federal jobs money in planning for the future."

In Hackensack, Kliszus hopes to eventually use the funds to restore jobs, re-establish cut programs and extracurricular clubs and reduce class sizes. But he also seemed ready to play it safe until the funding is finally in place.

"At this point, it's best to be pretty conservative and wait and see," Kliszus said. "There are still too many questions."

E-mail: bonamo@northjersey.com

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #65 on: October 06, 2010, 08:32:54 AM »
Charter schools rejected
Wednesday, October 6, 2010
BY LESLIE BRODY
The Record
STAFF WRITER

State officials have said no to three groups that hoped to start charter schools in Bergen County.

Documents released Tuesday showed the Education Department denied approval to the proposed Bergen Regional Charter School, which aimed to serve children in Fair Lawn, Glen Rock, Paramus and Ridgewood. It also denied requests for two language immersion programs Spartan Academy in Hackensack and Shalom Academy, drawing students from Englewood and Teaneck.

Two new charters were approved for a September 2011 opening in Passaic and Paterson, and two more were nixed there.

Overall, the state said yes to six new urban charters out of 29 applications last Thursday, just as Governor Christie was holding a press conference to call for more charters and school choice, especially in low-achieving districts.

"We cannot continue to ask children and families stuck in chronically failing public schools to wait any longer," he said. His press release noted that 104,000 students were "trapped in 205 chronically failing schools" in New Jersey. Last year, it said, 40 percent of New Jersey's African-American students and 32 percent of Hispanic students were unable to meet basic standards on a national test.

Charters have long been controversial, with supporters applauding the successful ones as laboratories for innovation and detractors arguing that they siphon money from regular public schools. Charters are taxpayer funded but independently operated. Now there are 72 open in New Jersey, including three each in Bergen and Passaic counties.

Superintendents in Fair Lawn, Glen Rock, Paramus and Ridgewood had lobbied the state against Bergen Regional Charter School. They wrote in a May letter to state leaders that the proposed charter would be an unnecessary "private school using public dollars" at a time when districts were reeling from cuts in state aid. They argued that the charter movement aimed to provide options in floundering districts, not high-performing ones like theirs.

The department's denial letter to Bergen Regional said the proposal lacked clear, measurable goals and did not show how it would integrate all of New Jersey's content requirements, among other concerns.

Anna Vladi, who applied for three years to open Bergen Regional, said Tuesday she was crushed and was likely too exhausted to try again. A computer consultant with two children in private schools, she wanted to build a charter that would be more rigorous in math and science than she found the local public schools to be.

"We only did it for our children and the community," she said. "None of us were planning to get a penny out of the school. Some people may be happy with schools here, which is fine, but there lots of parents that are not satisfied, and this would give them an option. So many parents will be so disappointed."

Meanwhile, organizers of the John P. Holland Charter School in Paterson were celebrating their approval for a school that would open next fall and eventually serve 198 children in kindergarten to eighth grade. Christina Scano, a former administrator at two existing Paterson charters, said she aimed to offer small class size and more individual attention than crowded public schools can provide. "I always knew I wanted to start my own charter because parents need more quality schools," she said.

Paterson Superintendent Donnie Evans said through a spokesperson that he supported school choice and looked forward to working with the new school.

The other local charter approved was the Passaic Arts and Sciences Charter in Passaic, which aims to serve 540 children in kindergarten through eighth grade with an extended school year.

Denials also went to the proposed Phoenix Academy charter for Paterson, Prospect Park and Haledon and Passaic Spanish Heritage Charter in Passaic.

In denial letters, the state said failing proposals had several problems, such as inconsistent themes and a dearth of adequate staffing plans.

The state has set Oct. 15 as a deadline for a new round of applicants for expedited decisions. Approved charters must show they have followed their plans before opening their doors in the fall. The others approved are in Jersey City, Newark, Willingboro and South Brunswick.

E-mail: brody@northjersey.com

Offline just watching

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #66 on: October 06, 2010, 05:48:48 PM »

Does anyone know WHO was pushing for the Spartan school in Hackensack, and WHERE they had planned to locate it.

I'm wondering because they can always reapply next year.

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #67 on: February 07, 2011, 08:57:38 PM »
Does anyone know the result of the vote yet?
_________________________________
Hackensack teachers union votes on pay freeze request
Monday, February 7, 2011
BY MONSY ALVARADO
The Record
STAFF WRITER

HACKENSACK The city teachers union voted Monday on whether to accept a pay freeze, a request made by the Board of Education which is in the process of drafting a spending plan for next school year.

Eileen Hooper, president of the Hackensack Education Association, said the union was told that if pay freezes are not accepted, layoffs will be a certainty. She said the number of staff that would lose their jobs if a pay freeze is rejected is not known.

We are going to have layoffs one way or the other, whether it passes or not, Hooper said. We just dont know the number of layoffs.

Frank Albolino, president of the board, said he doesnt know what a rejection of the pay freeze will mean to the multi-million dollar budget.

It will not help obviously, he said. It will mean a cut in staff across the board.

Albolino said besides the associations vote, the board is waiting for state aid figures to finalize a spending plan.

Hooper said the association represents 534 teachers and para-professionals. She said the ballots would be counted Monday evening, but said results would not be available until the union members were notified.

Staff from throughout the district filled the auditorium at Hackensack High School in the afternoon to ask questions and submit their salmon-colored ballots.

Some teachers said they were conflicted on what to do.

In my heart no matter what happens its going to be tough for everybody, said an elementary school teacher, who declined to give his name but said he did not submit a ballot. I would rather let the superintendent have to make that decision. It shouldnt be up to the teachers to decide how to use money in the school system.

Association members voted down the same question last year by more than 50 percent, Hooper said. She said two-thirds of the membership need to vote in favor of the pay freeze for it to pass.

The district laid off 20 teachers and 30 para-professionals last year.

E-mail: alvarado@northjersey.com

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #68 on: February 08, 2011, 10:22:31 PM »
Hackensack teachers union rejects pay freezes
Tuesday, February 8, 2011
BY MONSY ALVARADO
The Record
STAFF WRITER

HACKENSACK The city teachers union have rejected pay freezes next year.

Eileen Hooper, president of the Hackensack Education Association, said in an e-mail Tuesday that almost half of the associations membership was in favor of the pay freeze, but it was not enough to pass the question. She said two-thirds of the membership had to vote in favor of the pay freeze for it to pass. The union held a vote on the question on Monday.

This was a difficult decision for many of our members, she wrote. There were many factors involved and strong opinions on both sides of the issue.

We anticipate working with the Superintendent and Hackensack Board of Education to meet the challenge of the closing the budget shortfall and still maintain the quality of the educational system in Hackensack Public Schools, she added. We will work together to find a solution so we can provide the best education for the students in Hackensack Public Schools.

Frank Albolino, the board president, could not be reached Tuesday, but he said earlier in the week that a no vote would mean that there would likely be staff cuts.

The association held the vote on Monday after it was requested by the Board of Education, Hooper said. The association represents 534 teachers and paraprofessionals in the district.

Last year, the association also voted down pay freezes. The district laid off 20 teachers, and 30 paraprofessionals last year.

E-mail: alvarado@northjersey.com

Offline Hack72

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #69 on: February 09, 2011, 12:23:24 PM »
I learned recently that one of the reasons many unions are voting against the pay freeze is that there is no legal way to insure that the BOE will spend money saved on staff.  In other words, they may agree to have their pay frozen with the hope that other teachers' jobs will be saved, and that class sizes will be kept at a productive level, but the BOE might turn around and use that money for facilities or anything else they want to. 

I'd be interested to see Gov. Christie put something in place that requires any money saved through salary freezes to be spent on staff.

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #70 on: February 14, 2011, 09:27:14 AM »
Hearings begin today on state education aid cuts
Monday, February 14, 2011
Last updated: Monday February 14, 2011, 6:41 AM
BY LESLIE BRODY
The Record
STAFF WRITER

Bergen County Assignment Judge Peter E. Doyne is scheduled to start hearings in Hackensack today on the impact of last years state aid cuts to schools.

The New Jersey Supreme Court appointed Doyne as special master to examine whether the cuts infringed on students constitutional rights to  thorough and efficient education.

The Education Law Center challenged the cuts last summer, saying the Christie administrations roughly $1 billion decrease in aid to schools violated the states obligation to fully fund New Jerseys formula for distributing money to districts. The Christie administration countered the cuts, though painful, were necessary considering the states severe budget gap.

The state is expected to present its first witness this morning. Last week the Education Law Center filed a motion asking Doyne to stop the state from bringing state treasurer Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff as a witness, on grounds that the special master was assigned to review the effects of the cuts on students, not the states fiscal crisis. Judge Doyne said Friday he did not bar the state from calling the treasurer as a witness.

Lawyers involved have predicted the hearings will take about two weeks. Doyne is supposed to report back to the justices by March 31.

E-mail: brody@northjersey.com

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #71 on: March 03, 2011, 04:44:56 PM »
Hackensack schools super to retire
Thursday, March 3, 2011
BY MONSY ALVARADO
The Record
STAFF WRITER

HACKENSACK Schools Superintendent Edward Kliszus will retire this summer after less than three years in the district.

Kliszus, who submitted his retirement letter to Board President Frank Albolino on Monday, said the decision was based largely on the states pension reforms.

Thats an issue for anyone my age, and there are many superintendents retiring, said the 57 year old. The climate for educators in New Jersey is not a healthy one.

Kliszus retirement will take effect June 30.

I was surprised, but I wish Dr. Kliszus the best of luck in the future, Albolino said Thursday. I want to thank him for his years of service.

Kliszus retirement is listed on the Board of Educations meeting agenda for Thursday night, when it will also introduce a preliminary school budget for next year. The budget will include cuts in administrative, teacher and support staff positions, he said.

This is just sad and unfortunate, Kliszus said about the budget and the nearly $13 million in state aid cuts to the district in the past two years.

Albolino said he would like to name a new superintendent for the district before the start of next school year, but said the board has not discussed how it will proceed with its search for a new leader.

Kliszus, who earns $205,504, has a doctorate from New York University, a masters degree from the Manhattan School of Music, and a bachelors degree from Nyack College.

He started his education career as a music teacher in Union Township in 1977 and later became director of technology and the Gifted and Talented Program, before being named principal. He then served as superintendent of schools in Denville for more than a year.

Kliszus officially began working in Hackensack in October 2008, after Joseph Montesano retired from leading the district for 14 years.

His four-year contract, which called for 4 percent salary increases each year, wasnt set to expire until 2012.

Before coming to Hackensack, Kliszus had been superintendent of schools for the Belleville school district just shy of four years.

E-mail: alvarado@northjersey.com
___________
Reader Comments

1.Thursday March 3, 2011, 4:00 PM - Njlucifer says:
It's all about the money, not the children....

2.Thursday March 3, 2011, 3:17 PM - royallen says:
P.S. Joseoh Montesano retired with a pension of over $122,000 which he collects at his estate in Florida

3.Thursday March 3, 2011, 3:14 PM - royallen says:
I guess he decided to run out,before his 200K plus salary was reduced to 175K,which would have reduced his pension by about 20k per year

4.Thursday March 3, 2011, 2:44 PM - Njlucifer says:
The climate for educators in New Jersey is not a healthy one. I bet he meant the 'Climate to make lots of money...'



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School Budget/Layoffs
« Reply #72 on: March 04, 2011, 08:27:06 AM »
More layoffs loom for Hackensack schools
Thursday, March 3, 2011
BY MONSY ALVARADO
The Record
STAFF WRITER
HACKENSACK More layoffs are looming for the city school district, whose board on Thursday unveiled an $85.9 million spending plan for next school year.

The preliminary budget reflects a $1.22 million spending increase compared with the current budget and depends on $66.3 million being raised in property taxes. The tax levy would increase by 4.06 percent from this year, said Fred Martens, the business administrator.

Superintendent Edward Kliszus said district officials had to cut nearly $4.8 million from the budget to make up for shortfalls in state funding over the last two years. Although the district will receive $10.8 million in state aid next year more than the $9.9 million it received for the current year its significantly less than the $14.2 million it received for the 2009-10 school year. Martens said the reductions have had an impact on the districts surplus.

Our kids are losing a lot in the last two years, and its very unfortunate, Kliszus said before the board meeting, which more than 200 people attended. Its heartbreaking.

Kliszus said the current budget cuts $1.34 million in administrative costs, $887,000 in teaching and coaching expenses and $844,513 in support-staff costs. Those cuts will result in the elimination of vice principals at all four elementary schools, one assistant principal at the high school, and an assistant superintendent post. The preliminary budget would also call for the Middle School and the 5ive/6ix School to share a principal, and three vice principals. Each school currently has a principal. The middle school has three vice principals and the 5ive/6ix School has two.

Certified staff, including teachers, nurses and guidance counselors, are also slated to be laid off. Kliszus said approximately nine full-time positions will be cut, and eight coaching posts may also be eliminated.

He said $1.7 million is being trimmed from non-personnel expenses, which include supplies and utility costs.

Kliszus and board trustees stressed that the proposal can change before it goes before voters in April, and said upcoming retirements can impact the proposed budget.

Ada Torres-Wright, a parent, urged the board to be careful as it reduces staff.

I know that a good education costs money. My taxes go up, but as long as the children are receiving a good education, it is worth it, she said.

The district laid off 20 teachers and 30 paraprofessionals last year.


Offline irons35

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #73 on: March 04, 2011, 09:49:53 AM »
so let me see if I read this right.  4 grades in 1 school.(or what should be one school)  2 principals & 5 vice principals-along with 2 different staffs.  Wonder why taxes are out of control?
 
 I do not live in Hackensack anymore.  my oldest son goes to a 4 year middle school. same as Hackensack. the difference is that they have one principal and one vice principal and 2 secretaries.  And that school runs very efficiently. 

If the Hackensack Middle school cant run that way, maybe its time to find some new people that can run it properly. They did when I went there with 3 grades, 150 kids extra for the 4th grade in does not warrant a whole new set of staffs.   


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>The preliminary budget would also call for the Middle School and the 5ive/6ix School to share a principal, and three vice principals. Each school currently has a principal. The middle school has three vice principals and the 5ive/6ix School has two.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


Offline Hack72

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Re: Education/Charter Schools/Testing
« Reply #74 on: March 07, 2011, 05:04:22 PM »
While I agree that they could easily cut two VPs, there are about 1500 kids in that school.  The ratio of administrators now is 200/1, which is alot, but going down to 375/1 is shortchanging the school a bit, in my opinion.  It's much worse, however, at the elementary level where, in one case, the ratio of administrators to kids will be 620/1.  That's just irresponsible.