Author Topic: Columbus Day Parade/Street Fair  (Read 5292 times)

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Columbus Day Parade/Street Fair
« on: September 11, 2008, 11:31:41 AM »
From: http://www.columbusdayparadeofnorthjersey.org/about.html 

Columbus Parade Marching Through Hackensack Again

After an eight-year hiatus,  Hackensack is once again hosting a Columbus Day Parade. Hackensack Mayor Michael Melfi was the driving force behind  bringing the parade which marched through the city from 1996 through 2000.

The Columbus Day Parade was a great event that brought our community together, said Melfi. The upcoming parade will bring residents from across the state to our vibrant city. Diversity is key to this event. We welcome all community groups to participate.

The parade will step off at 11 a.m. on Oct. 5 and commence at the Bergen County Court House, travel down Main and State streets and end at Passaic Street. The parade will be complete with marching bands, floats, fire engines, motorcycles and more. All organizations and clubs are invited to participate in the parade.

The Columbus Day Parade Committee is looking for volunteers to help plan the event and organize sponsorships. Anyone interested in participating should visit www.columbusdayparadeofnorthjersey.org or call 201-646-3902.

Parade Information

Start time: 11 a.m.

Route: Begin at Bergen County Court House, Up Main Street, Left onto Atlantic Street, Right onto State Street, Right onto Passaic Street, Left onto Main Street, End at Anderson Street.

Click here for information about Hackensack's Street Fair to take place on the same day.



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Re: Columbus Day Parade/Street Fair
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2008, 12:32:28 AM »

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Re: Columbus Day Parade/Street Fair
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2008, 10:41:32 AM »
Loving the parade, not the economy
Monday October 6, 2008BY DOUGLASS CROUSE
   
HACKENSACK An early Columbus Day parade brought the city out Sunday to celebrate the heritage and contributions of Italian-Americans.

Yet as politicians, civic leaders and musicians marched by, many sidewalk discussions turned to the nation's economic health.

People along the downtown parade route said they were mostly confused by the $700 billion bailout Congress approved last week and conflicted about those parts they did grasp.

"I would prefer that there was no bailout, but then again I wonder if I really know enough about it," said Julie Monopoli, an account manager with a men's clothing manufacturer. "When we put people in office, we hope that they know more than we do and can act intelligently."

"Isn't that how we got into this mess?" asked Richard Ferraro, sitting beside Monopoli as a marching band filed past on State Street.

"Yes," Monopoli replied, "but we also need to rely on them to get us out of it."

Governor Corzine was among those who marched Sunday. Pausing to speak with reporters, he described the government rescue as an imperfect means of injecting fluidity into the credit markets.

"It's ugly, it's got a lot of problems with it, but it was necessary," he said.

New Jersey's current $33 billion budget is likely to take a hit given private sector job losses and the anticipated drop in business tax revenues, state officials say.

"We've taken steps [before the latest market trouble] to ease the burden on taxpayers," Corzine said, "but it's probably gotten more serious than those actions could provide for."

In response, the governor has asked legislators to shelve any bills that would increase spending and requested contingency plans from department heads for cuts of 5 percent. The Assembly plans hearings today to discuss measures to support businesses, workers and homeowners; the state Senate plans its own discussion for Oct. 20.

Marching with Corzine were U.S. Sens. Bob Menendez and Frank Lautenberg, who both voted for the bailout package, and Rep. Steve Rothman, D-Fair Lawn, who voted against it. Rothman has said the plan fails to address the mortgage crisis and offers little hope of stimulating the economy.

Menendez said he still sees a need for a stimulus package aimed at helping small businesses and the unemployed.

Parade-goers heard about a very different cause for concern from one of the cultural event's invited speakers.

Andrea Barbaria, vice consul of the Italian Consulate in New York, told a small crowd at Passaic and State streets that the teaching of Italian language and culture in public schools is imperiled.

He was referring to a proposal by the College Board to eliminate its Advanced Placement Italian course and exam because it was under-enrolled and losing money. The non-profit group prepares courses and corresponding exams in 37 subject areas.

Cultural groups and Italian instructors have said that move could erode student interest in studying the language at all. The College Board says it hopes to avoid the cut, and Italian Ambassador Giovanni Castellaneta and several Italian-American groups and individuals are raising funds to save the course.

Harry Comp, co-owner of Parisian Beauty Academy in Hackensack and a marcher on Sunday with the city's Chamber of Commerce, said the loss of AP Italian would upset his 12-year-old son.

"He's dying to learn Italian because of the relatives he's met in Sicily," said Comp, an Italian-American whose original family name was Compagnone. "It would be a shame if they took away that option" of higher-level study.

Barbaria said he will continue working to prevent the move as first consul of Italy's Newark consulate, a role change that coincides with the office's switch to full-time status next month.

Ironically, the threat to AP Italian comes as enrollment in Italian courses increases in New Jersey, said Michael Genevrino, interim director of the New Jersey Italian and Italian American Heritage Commission under the Department of Education.

The agency is seeking to create a program in which native Italian teachers could provide instruction here. "We're not talking about some sort of alternate route, but rather individuals who are already certified in another country," Genevrino said.

People along the downtown parade route said they were mostly confused by the $700 billion bailout Congress approved last week and conflicted about those parts they did grasp.

"I would prefer that there was no bailout, but then again I wonder if I really know enough about it," said Julie Monopoli, an account manager with a men's clothing manufacturer. "When we put people in office, we hope that they know more than we do and can act intelligently."

"Isn't that how we got into this mess?" asked Richard Ferraro, sitting beside Monopoli as a marching band filed past on State Street.

"Yes," Monopoli replied, "but we also need to rely on them to get us out of it."

Governor Corzine was among those who marched Sunday. Pausing to speak with reporters, he described the government rescue as an imperfect means of injecting fluidity into the credit markets.

"It's ugly, it's got a lot of problems with it, but it was necessary," he said.

New Jersey's current $33 billion budget is likely to take a hit given private sector job losses and the anticipated drop in business tax revenues, state officials say.

"We've taken steps [before the latest market trouble] to ease the burden on taxpayers," Corzine said, "but it's probably gotten more serious than those actions could provide for."

In response, the governor has asked legislators to shelve any bills that would increase spending and requested contingency plans from department heads for cuts of 5 percent. The Assembly plans hearings today to discuss measures to support businesses, workers and homeowners; the state Senate plans its own discussion for Oct. 20.

Marching with Corzine were U.S. Sens. Bob Menendez and Frank Lautenberg, who both voted for the bailout package, and Rep. Steve Rothman, D-Fair Lawn, who voted against it. Rothman has said the plan fails to address the mortgage crisis and offers little hope of stimulating the economy.

Menendez said he still sees a need for a stimulus package aimed at helping small businesses and the unemployed.

Parade-goers heard about a very different cause for concern from one of the cultural event's invited speakers.

Andrea Barbaria, vice consul of the Italian Consulate in New York, told a small crowd at Passaic and State streets that the teaching of Italian language and culture in public schools is imperiled.

He was referring to a proposal by the College Board to eliminate its Advanced Placement Italian course and exam because it was under-enrolled and losing money. The non-profit group prepares courses and corresponding exams in 37 subject areas.

Cultural groups and Italian instructors have said that move could erode student interest in studying the language at all. The College Board says it hopes to avoid the cut, and Italian Ambassador Giovanni Castellaneta and several Italian-American groups and individuals are raising funds to save the course.

Harry Comp, co-owner of Parisian Beauty Academy in Hackensack and a marcher on Sunday with the city's Chamber of Commerce, said the loss of AP Italian would upset his 12-year-old son.

"He's dying to learn Italian because of the relatives he's met in Sicily," said Comp, an Italian-American whose original family name was Compagnone. "It would be a shame if they took away that option" of higher-level study.

Barbaria said he will continue working to prevent the move as first consul of Italy's Newark consulate, a role change that coincides with the office's switch to full-time status next month

Ironically, the threat to AP Italian comes as enrollment in Italian courses increases in New Jersey, said Michael Genevrino, interim director of the New Jersey Italian and Italian American Heritage Commission under the Department of Education.

The agency is seeking to create a program in which native Italian teachers could provide instruction here. "We're not talking about some sort of alternate route, but rather individuals who are already certified in another country," Genevrino said.

Offline BLeafe

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Re: Columbus Day Parade/Street Fair
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2008, 08:47:06 PM »
Better late than never.

I just had some film - yes, film - developed and found this overview of Hackensack and the Columbus Day Parade's finish line that I took from my living room. You can see the reviewing stand on the right which contained all the local and state officials, including Governor Corzine.






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Re: Columbus Day Parade/Street Fair
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2008, 09:07:40 PM »
Thanks Bob.  I uploaded a bunch of pictures of the Columbus Day Parade here: http://hackensacknj.shutterfly.com/