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General Category => Hackensack Discussion => Topic started by: Editor on June 01, 2004, 01:50:12 PM

Title: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 01, 2004, 01:50:12 PM
COALITION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH & SAFETY
RECEIVES $20,000 CONTRIBUTION

(Carlstadt, NJ)  The Coalition for Public Health & Safety is pleased to advise that the Board of Chosen Freeholders of the County of Bergen, in its efforts at continuing its obligation to the safety and well being of all of its residents, has made an additional contribution of $20,000 to the Coalition.  This contribution has been made to assist the Coalition in payment of its remaining and subsequent legal fees with regard to the Coalition's battle for an environmental impact study of Teterboro Airport.  The contribution, made by Resolution No. 641, was passed unanimously at the May 19, 2004 Board of Chosen Freeholders meeting.

The Coalition for Public Health & Safety is a non profit organization comprised of 12 municipalities and the County of Bergen.  It was organized in an effort to address health concerns and safety issues emanating from Port Authority of NY & NJ's operation of Teterboro Airport in the middle of the most densely populated County of the State, and its impact on the quality of life issues for the surrounding residential communities.

The Coalition has brought litigation against the Port Authority of NY & NJ in Federal District Court seeking an environmental impact study of Teterboro Airport.  In September 2003, through the efforts of the Governor and Legislative Delegation, the Port Authority of NY & NJ contributed $300,000 and the NJ Meadowlands Commission contributed $150,000 toward conducting an environmental impact study of Teterboro Airport.  

Environ Corporation, who performed the initial 2 day sampling in June 2001, will conduct the study and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection will oversee the study.  It is anticipated that the study will begin some time within the next two months.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 10, 2004, 10:00:26 PM
Coalition Press Release

Rothman Gets House Panel to Extend Ban on Boeing Business Jet at Teterboro  Airport 

Congressman's Measure Will Maintain Prohibition on Aircraft Weighing More  Than 100,000 Pounds  Washington, DC - Following through on his promise to maintain the federal  ban at Teterboro Airport on planes weighing over 100,000 pounds that he  first secured last year, Congressman Steve Rothman (D-Fair Lawn) yesterday  got the House Appropriations Committee, of which he is a member, to approve  the ban for the upcoming year. The measure, which needs to be extended each  year, bans the Boeing Business Jet and other large planes from operating at  Teterboro by prohibiting the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) from  raising the 37 year-old, 100,000 pound weight limit at the airport. Rothman  said that since the annual ban has already been enacted once that he expects  it to be renewed this year with little or no resistance.   

The bill passed by the House Appropriations Committee today includes  provisions upholding the ban on 100,000 pound aircraft at Teterboro Airport  that we worked so hard last year to enact," Rothman said. "This will keep  out the 737 Boeing Business Jet and other huge aircraft don't belong at  Teterboro Airport. We secured a federal ban last year, we are going to  secure that same federal ban this year, and we will make certain that the  ban stays in place to ensure that no oversized planes will ever be allowed  at Teterboro."   In July 2003, the FAA announced its intention to overturn the weight limit  at Teterboro Airport to allow larger jets to operate at the Northern New  Jersey facility.

As a lifelong resident of Bergen County who is committed to  fighting aircraft noise and stopping the expansion of Teterboro Airport,  Rothman vehemently opposed the proposal and wrote legislation to stop the  FAA from going forward with its plan. He got the measure passed through the  House and enlisted the help of U.S. Senators Jon Corzine (D-NJ) and Frank  Lautenberg (D-NJ) to get the measure approved in the Senate. The measure  became law in January of 2004. The bill that passed the House Appropriations  Committee today is identical to the measure signed into law in January and  would extend the ban for another full year. Senators Corzine and Lautenberg  are again helping to pass identical legislation in the Senate.  "Newark, LaGuardia, and JFK Airports are designed for large jets, not  Teterboro. We are going to continue fighting and taking every step necessary  to ensure that airline companies do not degrade the quality of life of  Northern New Jersey residents by bringing their large and loud jets into  Teterboro Airport," Rothman said.   The bill containing Rothman's provision will be considered by the full House  when Congress reconvenes in September. The provision is part of the  Transportation Appropriations bill for Fiscal Year 2005.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 23, 2005, 04:04:18 PM
From The Record, January 13, 2005.

How very fortunate and lucky |for Norma Baguer and her family that no one was injured ("Piece falls from plane after takeoff (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjM3NjI4)," Page L-1, Jan. 10). This just reinforces the fact that there is no rationale for a jetport at Teterboro Airport in the middle |of densely packed residential communities.

Jet aircraft fly very low on approach to the airport over a vast number of homes, schools and playgrounds. The airport creates noise pollution affecting learning for dozens of children. The solution is having the Federal Aviation Administration pick up the bulk of the cost for soundproofing those schools.

What would Teterboro operators suggest be done to protect ourselves and our loved ones from falling debris as use of this facility increases? Answer: Expand Newark Liberty Airport and put corporate jet traffic back where it belongs, where it is more appropriate for international flights to land and where there is more appropriate security.

Carol J. Skiba

Hasbrouck Heights, Jan. 10

Related Story:   Piece falls from plane after takeoff (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjM3NjI4)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 02, 2005, 09:20:57 AM
Private Jet Crashes Near Teterboro, NJ Airport-Report (http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20050202/us_nm/crash_plane_dc_8)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: lab94 on February 02, 2005, 01:03:36 PM
Again it looks like we have lucked out. Our luck can't last forever! How many accidents or as they called them incidence have happen in the last five years. We have todays, the one on Jan 13. There was the one at the end of last year when the plane skidded off the runway (wasn't a plane blown over by wind around the same time). Then there was the other plane that crashed at the end of the runway and the pilot died. and there was the one that crashed and a few people died ( I think it was 4 ) in Hasbrouck HTS. I thought I heard of two other planes that had crashed at other airports that had left from Teterboro. I also wonder if the Schools,High Rises,and other buildings have a disaster plan for a plane crash, not just a regular fire plan.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 03, 2005, 07:03:20 PM
[As printed in the 2/3/05 edition of The Record]

In reference to the jet crash at Teterboro Airport, maybe now those pinheads who want to bring in larger aircraft will reconsider.

Although as of this writing there were no reported fatalities, it was still a horrible situation.

I am a resident of Prospect Avenue in Hackensack, and when I stand out on my terrace, I usually "wave" to the aircraft as they make their final approach to Teterboro. It's amazing that none of these aircraft has crashed into one of the many high-rises on Prospect Avenue, or worse yet, Hackensack University Medical Center, also in the flight path.

Rep. Steve Rothman, D-Fair Lawn, will have to continue his fight to ban larger jets at Teterboro and maybe even work to discontinue some of the aircraft currently using Teterboro before a situation worse than Wednesday's happens.

A word to the wise is sufficient.

Sharon Solomon

Hackensack, Feb. 2
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 06, 2005, 08:21:46 PM
Somebody emailed me this article today.  I'm not sure which news outlet wrote it.

DiGAETANO, RANDALL CALL FOR IMMEDIATE CLOSURE OF TETERBORO  AIRPORT

BAN ON NON-ESSENTIAL TRAFFIC SOUGHT

Convenience For The Rich Is Costing Lives
[/b]

February 2, 2005

(Bergen County, NJ) New Jersey Assemblyman Paul DiGaetano (R-Bergen/Passaic)and Bergen County Freeholder Elizabeth “Lisa” Randall are calling on all local elected officials and Gov. Dick Codey to demand that  the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey close Teterboro Airport to non essential traffic, following the devastating crash earlier today

        Randall said Teterboro has been “an accident waiting to happen” for too long and that it’s time a “remove this menace from our community before more people are hurt and killed.”

          The two Republicans are calling for an immediate ban on non-essential, non-government flights to Teterboro. The ban will give federal officials time to study the latest crash and to ensure that all safety measures are being followed to prevent future tragedies.

        Randall said she would like to see the airport closed, but said federal aviation officials have been opposed to that idea for many years  and admits permanently closing the airport would be difficult.

          “Teterboro Airport is little more than a convenience for the wealthy corporate elite and celebrities who can’t be bothered going to Newark Airport. But people shouldn’t have to die so the rich and famous aren’t inconvenienced,” said Randall.

          DiGaetano noted that today’s plane crashed in to a building just a few yards away from the county vocational high school. “Today's crash could have been a tragedy, many children could have been lost had this accident occurred just a few hours and a few feet from when and where it did” said DiGaetano. "We must ensure that the airport and those who use it are following safety procedures before Teterboro is reopened to anything other than essential traffic."

          “The men and women from our emergency management services who responded should be commended for their dedicated work,” added the assemblyman.

          “But the fact is that brave public servants cannot prevent tragedies. Only the governor and policy makers at the Port Authority can demand that a through review is completed before the airport is reopened,” added DiGaetano.

          Randall said that Teterboro has become a political public relations opportunity for too long with too little being done to protect Bergen residents from the noise and pollutions caused by the airport.

          “I am amazed to see many public officials today are busy slapping themselves on the back for their small role in stopping bigger jets from landing at Teterboro.  But that’s not the issue we are facing today. It was not a 737 jet that crashed today; it was a smaller jet. So the real question is why is this airport allowed to operate at all in the most densely populated county in the state?”
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 07, 2005, 09:26:43 AM
The following comments were forwarded to me for posting:

It's time our representatives be held accountable for our lives.  Continuing
to trumpet the defeat of the Boeing Business Jet is like crowing about
banning assault weapons.  Both are good things to stop.   But when someone holds me
up it's going to be a handgun they kill me with, not an Uzi.  The BBJ (Boeing Business Jet)  maybe would have been 1% of all operations at Teterboro Airport.   The jet that's going kill us will be one of the 99% still flying, likely bigger than the one that crashed last week.

It is time to get Senator/Governor Corzine's, Representative Rothman's, and
Senator Lautenberg's eyes on the prize.  It is past time to move the corporate
jets at TEB to Morristown or Essex County (who don't want the jets, either). 
The rich and famous will have to drive in their limos thirty minutes longer to
get to the airport.  Better them riding longer now than hundreds riding in
the lines of limos that will be needed for the funerals when a Gulfstream
crashes into Hackensack's Medical Center, high-rise apartment buildings and
Hasbrouck Heights' homes.

The Instrument Landing System has been in violation of FAA environmental
regulations since it was opened.  It should be closed now, which will stop many
corporate flights.  If TEB were illegally dumping toxic waste into the
Hackensack River that put lives at risk I don't think the feds or the state would allow
dumping to continue.  Why is the illegal ILS allowed to put our lives at risk
hundreds of times a day?

I am also weary of the letters to the editor saying "You moved near Teterboro
knowing it was an airport."  When my parents moved here in 1956, TEB was a
GENERAL AVIATION Airport, not an International airport and brother to LaGuardia,
Newark and JFK.  There were no corporate jets in 1956.  The "You moved near
Teterboro knowing it was an airport" argument is like saying "You moved near
the Ridgefield Power Plant knowing it generated electricity" after the coal/oil
generator was replaced by a nuclear reactor in violation of environmental
regulations and disregarding the safety of the millions living so close to the
plant.  I'll agree to Teterboro staying open if it again becomes the Teterboro
Airport my parents knew.

We all need to call our Congressperson and Senators offices and get the names
of their transportation aides, their e-mails and phone numbers.  We need
specific contacts we can pin down (e.g., Robert Helland, an aide to now Senator
Corzine's office, who uncovered the actually number of yearly operations during
Corzine's campaign). It's time Congressperson and Senators get daily e-mails
(along with every media contact we have) naming them as "non-doers."   What's
more "The Record" better get a clear idea that we're not kidding and their "TEB
can be fixed" attitude is not being "a friend to the people it serves."

We must light a fire under these people and keep it burning if we don't want
to die by fire.

Dick Bruno
Hackensack
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 07, 2005, 05:54:40 PM
"It's a rich man's airport, for rich guys and movie stars,"

See full article:  Criticism of Teterboro intensifies after jet crash (http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/states/new_jersey/10836516.htm)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 08, 2005, 03:18:11 PM
Hackensack Fire Department Responds to Plane Crash (http://www.hackensack.org/controls/eventview.aspx?MODE=SINGLE&ID=35) (From official website)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 22, 2005, 11:28:44 PM
Some pictures:

(http://www.hackensacknow.org/images/planebuilding.jpg)

(http://www.hackensacknow.org/images/planetruck.jpg)

(http://www.hackensacknow.org/images/mangled car.jpg)

Courtesy of:

(http://www.hackensacknow.org/images/brian.jpg)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 26, 2005, 09:59:59 AM
Port Authority to keep soundproofing schools near N.J. airports (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjU4Nzk5)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 04, 2005, 09:03:01 AM
Latest story:  FAA grounds airplane operator (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjYxNjg3)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 09, 2005, 11:12:24 AM
Aye, ye, ye....

Another one:  Jet skids off runway at Teterboro (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjYzOTM1)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 14, 2005, 09:40:27 PM
This post was sent to me by Mr. Paul Griffo and is reprinted with permission.  It was altered slightly for grammar and continuity.

In light of the following article, shouldn't we again renew our concerns about security at Teterboro? Shouldn't we be calling for the closing of this real and present threat to Bergen County?
 
It's time to step up the calls, e-mails and letters to the newspaper editors.  Security at Teterboro is a joke and Bergen County is a target rich area for any terrorist at any time.  Who wants to be in the football stadium when Al Qaeda drops a Gulfstream V onto the 50 yard line during a game?  Or in Hackensack Hospital, or the offices of the Bergen Record?  You don't have to hijack a plane out of the airport, you just have to fly one into it!  (or into a target seconds from the airport, like the stadium, Hackensack Hospital, GW Bridge, Empire State Building, etc.

 
Government Report on U.S. Aviation Warns of Security Holes
By ERIC LICHTBLAU

Published: March 14, 2005

WASHINGTON, March 13 - Despite a huge investment in security, the American aviation system remains vulnerable to attack by Al Qaeda and other jihadist terrorist groups, with noncommercial planes and helicopters offering terrorists particularly tempting targets, a confidential government report concludes.

Intelligence indicates that Al Qaeda may have discussed plans to hijack chartered planes, helicopters and other general aviation aircraft for attacks because they are less well-guarded than commercial airliners, according to a previously undisclosed 24-page special assessment on aviation security by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Department of Homeland Security two weeks ago.

But commercial airliners are also "likely to remain a target and a platform for terrorists," the report says, and members of Al Qaeda appear determined to study and test new American security measures to "uncover weaknesses."

The assessment comes as the Bush administration, with a new intelligence structure and many new counterterrorism leaders in place, is taking stock of terrorists' capabilities and of the country's ability to defend itself.

Click here for the full article. (http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/14/politics/14terror.html?oref=login)  Requires registration.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 18, 2005, 06:45:39 PM
It just keeps getting better...

FAA warns Teterboro pilots (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjY3MDI4)

Maybe someone can answer this:

Aside from serving as an airport for organ donations (a worthy cause) how does this airport benefit the same people it threatens and annoys?  I understand that ordinary people have to tolerate some minor inconveniences for the sake of commerce and industry, but no one can tell me (and I've been asking) how Teterboro serves folks like me and you. 

From what I'm hearing, the health and safety of a highly populated region (not to mention the quiet enjoyment of property) is compromised because Eminem, Ted Turner and Martha Stewart don't want to use Newark Airport when they go skiing at Telluride.   I'm sick of it.

I can live with Newark Airport.  I derive a benefit because I use it.  But if rich, inconsiderate celebrities and business people want to use Teterboro because it's "more convenient" then they can pay my property taxes via a whopping airport safety/convenience surcharge.

The Port Authority spokesperson said: "We're supportive of any measure that will enhance increased safety in the skies."   Why not impose a surcharge that discourages frivolous usage?
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 18, 2005, 07:15:30 PM
Oh, and one more thing:

This is from The Herald.

"increased security measures implemented at large commercial airports have not been implemented at smaller general aviation airports, like Teterboro. Noncommercial airplanes and helicopters could become the new weapons of choice for al-Qaida."


Wonderful.

Click here for the story. (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkxNCZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NjY2NjIyNQ==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Paul I on March 21, 2005, 11:55:21 AM
I think creating a surcharge for planes taking offf and landing at Teterboro airport is a wonderful idea!

Unfortunately those who fly in and out of it will go alnong with paying it. This problem we have is all about money. 
Corporate money, celebrity money, rich people's money, Lobbyists money!

These people don't care about the families and towns
that live around the airport . They could care less.

We need to expose those people and flights and shame them, through media coverage!

Sometimes I count the number of flights taking off        flying over my house.  One morning I counted 28 planes between 7 am and 8 am. Thats absurd! Approximately one every 2 minutes.  Spewing out their pollution over
the children going to school and in the playgrounds...

Don' t those people in Government care?




Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 24, 2005, 10:38:59 AM
Latest stories from 3/24/05 edition of The Record:

Teterboro probe cites jet's weight (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjcwMjAw)

Parsippany man indicted over use of laser pointer (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjcwMTM5)

From "Your Views"

Oh, yes, acting Governor Codey's consideration of using the Bendix site for international cargo storage is a great one ("Port's big plans," Page B-1, March 17). I'm sure area residents feel that having to contend with Teterboro Airport in their back yards isn't enough. So why not store tons of international cargo there, too?

We all know terrorists would never think of using cargo containers for acts of terror. And our roads aren't nearly congested enough. Higher levels of diesel exhaust from the tractor-trailers hauling the cargo, mixed with jet fuel exhaust, won't be a problem. I don't mind paying $185 for each of my three children's two-week supply of asthma medication.

I'm sure the subhead, "Teterboro site may help world trade," will inspire area residents to gladly sacrifice their health, and the health and well-being of their children. After all, what could be more important than "world trade," and all that goes with it? Especially right in our own back yards.

Catherine Cahill

Moonachie, March 18
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Hackensack Jazz on March 30, 2005, 01:47:30 PM
opinion -
1. I agree with the closing of Teterboro to non-essential so long as Army and/or CIA or DIA Warrant Officers can train, land, and fly there.
2. Limit craft, size, congestion and traffic patterns to adjusted acceptance.
3. Place 10:00 PM limit on prop craft lacking sufficiient buffer at a reccomendable decibel level.
4. Limit copters over city limits except for news and unmarked black helicopters, or mapping etc. (no joyriding!)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 10, 2005, 10:17:38 AM
This is a must read article:   Troubling uses for Teterboro (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk5JmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2Njc3NTAy)

The author questions recently revealed uses for Teterboro including using it to send suspected terrorists off to Syria to be tortured.

In addition, the author writes:

Far too often, the question about Teterboro's potential danger overshadows another question: What kind of jet traffic does Teterboro cater to? But even more basic is this question: Is Teterboro's jet traffic really all that necessary - necessary enough for the feds to soundproof schools?

In January, many guests flying to Donald Trump's wedding in Florida departed from Teterboro. Apparently, these A-list celebrities simply would not stoop to using Newark, LaGuardia or JFK. In February, Teterboro was cited - praised, even - when a private jet was needed for a quick delivery of a professional basketball player to a game at Madison Square Garden. A flight on a commercial jet apparently just would not do.


Enough is Enough.  Residents really need to apply more pressure.  Keep writing, calling, emailing your elected officials and the NY/NJ Port Authority.  Nothing will happen unless there is a tremendous public outcry.

Find your Representative here (http://www.house.gov/).
Email the Port Authority (http://www.panynj.gov/rfframe.HTM)

At the end of the day, the Teterboro issue is simply a matter of weighing benefit against risk and burden.  So far, no one has shown any real benefit to factor into the equation.



Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 13, 2005, 05:11:12 PM
FAA Rulmaking Changes.  Affidavits needed. 

Here's your chance to make a difference.

From the City's official site: Click here (http://www.hackensack.org/controls/eventview.aspx?MODE=SINGLE&ID=58).
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 14, 2005, 09:06:06 AM
From The Record's "Your Views", April 14, 2005:

At last someone gets it ("Troubling uses for Teterboro," Opinion, Page |O-1, April 10). Columnist Mike Kelly spoke loudly and clearly on behalf of thousands who live with the terror that is Teterboro Airport.

What can a populace do when a government supports a policy that impairs health, harms children and hurts citizens economically? How can people fight a government agency, the Federal Aviation Administration, that operates outside the jurisdiction of state and local government? Perhaps we can look to Boston patriots in the 1770s for direction.

The incalculable irresponsibility that permits flying over Hackensack University Medical Center in spite of the original FAA impact study's concerns for safety speaks to the level of disregard for life.

Yes, this exploitation on behalf of a few wealthy individuals who unwittingly or irresponsibly affect the health of citizens around Teterboro Airport represents immoral activity and should end now.

Kevin Heaney


Hackensack, April 11
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 17, 2005, 10:55:48 AM
Latest story: Teterboro pilots get told: Pay attention! (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjgxMDk5JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)

Unbelievable.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 19, 2005, 09:38:29 AM
Latest Story: Covering fear with flowers (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NjgxNzM5)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 22, 2005, 10:19:43 AM
Latest story: FAA working on clearer chart for Teterboro pilots (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2MDYmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY2ODI3NjUmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkz)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 20, 2005, 11:52:34 PM
Latest story: PA wants tougher rules at Teterboro (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2Njk2MzMzJnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 23, 2005, 09:32:06 AM
Latest story: Teterboro Airport could get safety barriers by 2007 (http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--teterborobarriers0522may22,0,1624796.story?coll=ny-region-apnewjersey)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: McKenna on May 23, 2005, 10:57:39 PM
I think creating a surcharge for planes taking offf and landing at Teterboro airport is a wonderful idea!

There are surcharges, Landing Fees, storage, ramp space. They are not small fee's either. This airport is one of the most not to say profitable, but immense amounts of money go through there on a daily basis. You may all bring up issues about KTEB, but within 20 miles, we have KEWR, KLGA and KJFK. Going into those airports are planes that weigh up to 10 times the amount of the largest of the planes going into TEB. KTEB has been around much longer than most things in this area, therefore it is "grandfathered" in my mind. There are weight limits, Recently there was discussion of allowing the BBJ and ACJ to land, but that was not allowed due to their weight. KTEB has been here for 70+ years and will stay for many more.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Rob Gartner on May 24, 2005, 11:17:17 AM
At what level of use should Teterboro be “grandfathered”?  The traffic at Teterboro was mostly smaller prop planes twenty years ago.  Now it is much larger jets.  The only reason the Boeing Business Jet (at over 100,000 pounds) was stopped was because local citizen groups fought it.  Boeing will be back to fight that battle again.  Much of the noise problem in Hackensack is due to the installation of an ILS on runway 19.  That just happened in the last 10 years.  Should that be grandfathered too?  Where does the growth of this airport end? 

Yes, there are larger planes flying into Newark but commercial aviation is at least regulated.  Airport security has been dramatically increased over the last few years at the bigger airports.  Teterboro was largely exempt from those requirements.  It wasn’t a Newark Airport flight that ran into a building on Route 46.  It wasn’t a Newark Airport flight that crashed in the backyard of a Hasbrouck Heights home a few years back.  It wasn’t pilots from Newark getting warned by the FAA for not following the correct flight paths recently.  Those planes flying a few hundred feet above Hackensack Medical Center aren’t going to Newark.  On a broader scale, it wasn’t a commercial airliner causing an evacuation of the White House a few weeks back.

As far as fees go, until recently, even Teterboro’s own website advertised their low cost as a reason to use the airport.  Obviously, that was dropped once they started getting criticism.

The airport, in my opinion, has grown well beyond an acceptable level given its location.  The noise, pollution and risk of an accident places an unfair burden on the surrounding communities.  The Port Authority and the FAA have simply not demonstrated the ability or desire to mitigate the impact on local residents.  Growth should not only be stopped.  Traffic should be reduced.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: McKenna on May 24, 2005, 02:33:31 PM
After thinking more into the topic, Teterboro has been here for 70+ years, longer than most things in this area, and the construction of such objects like roads and what would be deemed as "valuble" structures. This ironically seems like the same kind of problem that has recently happened out at Somerset airport with the arrival of Northstar, though they are more focusing on the noise. They are creating an argument, when they are the ones using the service most. As a note, accidents happen at all airports, and it was poor planning for the companies around the airport to set up this dangerously close.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 26, 2005, 11:36:31 PM
Latest story: Teterboro needs its own security force, lawmakers say (http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--teterboro-securit0526may26,0,7358597.story?coll=ny-region-apnewjersey)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: lab94 on May 31, 2005, 01:39:09 PM
Wow, another plane crashes at Teterboro!!! Is anyone keeping count? I think that’s 3 this year and about 10 in the last 5 or 6 years if you include the planes that crashed in route to other airports. I had people over on Mon. (I live on Hopper St.) and they were amazed at how low they come in. Every 2 minutes, we were taking bets if the planes would give us the high beams if we flipped them the bird as they flew over. But, ask them if I'm in the flight pattern?  They tell you the planes only use a north approach in bad weather (IFR). But on Mon. the weather was not that bad out; in fact I got a nice tan watching them fly over my house.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 31, 2005, 04:04:01 PM
Latest story: Plane Crashes at Teterboro Airport in N.J. (http://wireservice.wired.com/wired/story.asp?section=Breaking&storyId=1041950&tw=wn_wire_story)

(See above post by Lab94 about the crash)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 01, 2005, 11:29:09 AM
Latest stories:

Pilot hurt as crippled craft misses runway and burns (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzAyMTU0)

(See above article for a "Timeline of Incidents" at Teterboro.)

Crash injures pilot, renews fear (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzAyMjY1)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 02, 2005, 09:27:28 AM
The following was sent to me for posting:

TETERBORO AIRPORT CRASH SITE RUNWAY OPERATES IN VIOLATION OF FAA REGULATIONS.

The Instrument Landing System on runway 19, site of yesterday's jet crash, operates in violation of FAA regulations.  The Record stated "when it comes to controlling the number of flights in and out of Teterboro, Port Authority officials said their hands are tied."  We have been working without success for five years to point out to the PA, state, federal and local officials that their hands are not tied and to reveal what eventually will be a fatal mistake:

Acceptance of the FAA's flawed environmental impact statement that allowed installation of the Instrument Landing System (ILS) on runway 19, the runway on which yesterday's crash occurred.  The FAA's environmental impact statement allowed the ILS to operate because annual aircraft takeoffs and landings would "remain under 170,000" until 2007" (please see below).  There were more than 202,000 flights this year, a 4% increase from last year.

The Port Authority could reduce takeoffs and landings to 170,000 tomorrow if they wanted to comply with the ILS environmental impact statement.  Or, alternately, the PA could shut down the ILS in order to comply with the environmental impact statement.  If the FAA balks, the PA can go to court, citing the requirements of the FAA's own environmental regulations.  But, officials will not shut down the ILS-19 nor limit flights.  Why won't the PA, Congressman Rothman and our Senators -- one of whom wants to be governor -- use the FAA's own regulations to reduce flights at Teterboro?  Why won't The Record or other local media cover the story of the illegal operation of the ILS?

There is a money trail that allowed the ILS to be built and to continue to
operate in spite of violating FAA's own takeoff and landing restrictions.  I am afraid only the horror of a jet plowing into Hackensack's Medical Center and high-rise apartments, which lie dozens of feet beneath the ILS approach to runway 19, will force compliance with the FAA's own regulations. 

Dr. Richard L. Bruno
Hackensack
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 02, 2005, 09:34:36 AM
The following was sent to me for posting:

   Today's RECORD states "when it comes to controlling the number of flights in  and out of Teterboro, Port Authority officials said their hands are tied."  We  have been working without success for five years to point out to the PA,  state, federal and local officials that their hands are not tied and to reveal  what eventually will be fatal mistake: Acceptance of the FAA's flawed  environmental impact statement that allowed installation of the Instrument Landing System  (ILS) on runway 19, the runway on which yesterday's crash occurred.  The  FAA's environmental impact statement allowed the ILS to operate because annual  aircraft takeoffs and landings would "remain under 170,000" until 2007" (please  see below).  There were more than 202,000 flights this year, a 4% increase from  last year.

   The Port Authority could reduce takeoffs and landings to 170,000 tomorrow if  they wanted to comply with the ILS environmental impact statement.  Or,  alternately, the PA could shut down the ILS in order to comply with the ILS  environmental impact statement.  If the FAA balks, the PA can go to court, citing the  requirements of the FAA's own environmental regulations.  But, officials will  not shut down the ILS-19 nor limit flights.  Why won't the PA, Congressman  Rothman and our Senators -- one of whom wants to be governor -- use the FAA's own  regulations to reduce flights at Teterboro?  Why won't The Record or other  local media cover the story of the illegal operation of the ILS?

   There is a money trail that allowed the ILS to be built and to continue to  operate in spite of violating FAA's own takeoff and landing restrictions.  I am  afraid only the horror of a jet plowing into Hackensack's Medical Center and  high-rise apartments, which lie beneath the ILS approach to runway 19, will  force compliance with the FAA's own regulations. 

Dr. Richard L. Bruno
Hackensack

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 02, 2005, 09:39:11 AM

Letter to Hon. Jon Corzine
:

The Honorable Jon Corzine
United States Senate

August 27, 2003

Dear Senator:

Since April, 2000 I have been working with Congressman Steve Rothman  regarding the numerous errors, inconsistencies and obfuscation in the FAA's "FINDING  OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT" that allowed the ILS on Runway 19 at Teterboro  Airport (TEB) to open and allowed planes to fly dozens of feet over the high-rise apartment buildings in the Hackensack Heights and Hackensack University Medical  Center (HUMC). 

Congressman Rothman arranged with the FAA for planes to fly an  eastern offset to Runway 19, taking them down the Hackensack River, when planes were not using the ILS during bad weather.  With the appointment of new FAA  Administrator Blakely, planes are once again flying directly over HUMC.  With  the August 5, 2003 crash of a corporate jet at a small Connecticut airport,  North Jersey residents are terrified that a corporate jet, or soon the 737  Boeing Business Jet, will cartwheel through the Hackensack Heights and HUMC,  killing thousands.

In 2002 you wrote to FAA Eastern Regional Administrator Arlene Feldman,  asking her to respond to my letter asking about the "FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT  IMPACT."  With Congressman Rothman's arrangement there was no need for these  questions to be answered.  Now it is vital to the safety HUMC patients and staff  that the questions finally be answered and that ILS-19 approach once again be  directed away from the Hackensack Heights.

As you know members of the New Jersey delegation have been calling FAA  Administrator Blakely and DOT Secretary Minetta about their concerns.  Neither has returned the calls.  Can you please help us at least get answers to our  questions regarding the significant safety concerns of flights over HUMC?  These are  Administrator Feldman's responses to my questions on 2002:

1998 TEB Operations Exceed FAA Projection for 2007.

The FAA "FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT" that allowed ILS-19 to open states:

• p3: "Recently, total activity levels appear to have stabilized at  approximately 160,000 annual movements.  Total activity has remained at or very close  to this level since the end of 1989. Forecast data used for the Environmental Assessment noise analysis were  predicted on three well established trends (including) Total airport operations  remain under 170,000 annual operations. This leads to a total annual movement sum  of 167,799 by the Year 2007." (page 2)

 p7:  "The proposal is not expected to increase traffic levels at TEB."

The FAA was asked for the actual number of total TEB operations from June,  1999 to June, 2000.  Ms. Feldman refused to provide the total TEB operations  data but instead reported operations only for Runway 19.  She does apparently  revise upward the TEB aircraft operations forecast, providing a 1999 number that  is within 627 operations of the 2007 prediction:

"The projected total landings and takeoffs used in the noise analysis for the  two-year period ending 1999 was 166,172 operations, or a 4.3% increase over  1996 operations.  For the seven years from 1990 to 1996, there was a 0.5%  decrease in traffic, however, the EA used an estimated 4.3% increase over the two  year period ending 1999, as a conservative estimate.

In 1996, according to data provided by the airport operator, Johnson  Controls, the specific mix of total operations using Runway 19 was 15,057 landings and  6,539 takeoffs.  Johnson Controls  also provided us with data relevant to the  use of Runway 19 for the period of June, 1999 through the end of June, 2000.   Specifically, there were a total of 47,177 flight operations (36,241  arrivals, and 10,936 departures) using Runway 19 during this period."

In a May 19, 2000 letter to me, Robert Helland, an aide to now Senator Jon  Corzine, uncovered the fact that the FAA recorded 198,466 annual operations at  TEB during 1998, a 10% increase over 1997 and an 18% increase over the "FINDING  OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT" projection for 2007.   

Without even considering the numerous other errors in the application of data  and inconsistencies in the ILS-19 "FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT," if the  report’s environmental impact conclusions were predicted on total airport  operations remaining under 170,000 through the year 2007, the FAA's own record of  198,466 annual operations at TEB in 1998 violates the cumulative noise impact  projection and alone invalidates the "FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT."   This data should force a restriction of flights using TEB to within 170,000  until a valid and unbiased environmental assessment can be conducted.

The data Ms. Feldman provided does show that there was a 118% increase from  1998 to 1999 in flights using Runway 19.  While this number represents only a  portion of total TEB flight operations, it is representative of the marked  increase in traffic into TEB and contradicts the report’s statement that "The  proposal is not expected to increase traffic levels at TEB."  Most important, the  118% increase in traffic using Runway 19 explains the increased concern of  those at HUMC.  It is the flights using Runway 19 that are placing our lives at  risk. 

Elevation Danger in the Hackensack Heights not Addressed.

The FAA "FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT" states:   • p4: ILS-19 "moves the approach away from residential areas to the  predominantly industrialized areas North of the airport."
ILS-19 is in actuality an approach directly over residential areas to the  northwest of the airport, residential areas containing the tallest buildings in  the area.  On p 4-1, the report does note that "community areas to the west and  north lie at much higher elevations than the airport. These include  Wood-Ridge, Hasbrouck Heights and Hackensack."  But the wisdom of aircraft flying over  those "higher elevations" is never addressed.

The FAA was asked to address the report’s misstatement that ILS-19 "moves  the approach away from residential areas to the predominantly industrialized  areas North of the airport," never mentions the effect of noise and safety on  these "much higher elevations" nor the implications of aircraft flying  apparently 50 feet above numerous high-rise buildings and over a majo medical center.   I also asked for FAA radar tape data documenting the minimum and average  altitudes of aircraft flying over HUMC.  Ms. Feldman did not address the  misstatement, provided no data for actual aircraft elevations but provided the following  calculation:

"An aircraft using ILS guidance will generally be at a 3 degree angle  downward to the touchdown point on the runway.  Therefore, by taking into account and  adjusting for the height of a building such as the Hackensack University  Medical Center (HUMC), as well as considering the physical terrain in the  vicinity, we are able to determine that an aircraft using an ILS approach to Runway 19  at TEB would be approximately 400 feet above the top of that building."

Although we have no measurements or radar data, simple observation and  photographs indicate that aircraft are consistently less than 400 feet above HUMC  and less than 100 feet above the high-rise apartment buildings just north of  HUMC.

(continued in next post)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 02, 2005, 09:39:32 AM
Continued from prior post:

Noise Levels Over HUMC.

The FAA "FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT" states:    • p 25: "No hospitals are included within any noise contour" (i.e., noise   >>65 Ldn).

• Fig 3-4: "Departing aircraft must not exceed 80 dB(A) Between 2200 and  0700 local time and 90 dB(A) at all other times at Noise Monitor 1 located 1.9  nautical mile from normal brake release point."

The FAA was asked what peak and average noise levels the FAA monitors have  actually recorded since ILS-19 opened in June, 1999 and to calculate a new noise  contour based on those data. Ms. Feldman provided no noise data but stated:

"Teterboro Airport and the Teterboro Advisory Noise Abatement Advisory  Committee (TANAAC), comprising the political leaders and representatives of  surrounding municipalities, maintains an extensive network of noise monitors.  The FAA  does not conduct independent noise monitoring.  Additionally, a TEB Noise  Abatement Procedure is in place encouraging users of TEB not to exceed specified  decibel levels upon takeoff from the airport.  This too, is not a FAA  requirement or regulation."

Table 6-1 of the "FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT" shows that the average  1996 noise at HUMC was 58.8 dB (RMS3 monitor).  The 58.8 dB level at HUMC was  primarily the result of flights whose path is to the east up the Hackensack  River.  This 1996 noise level cannot reasonably be used to predict the noise  levels created by ILS-19 in the year 1998, in which 118% more aircraft flew dire ctly over HUMC.  In fact, TANAAC monitors have measured noise levels of over  100dB since ILS-19 opened at HUMC and Hiller School, (which is south of HUMC  along the ILS-19 flight path), not only during the day but also at 1:00 and 3:00  AM.  Similar A-weighted noise levels were recorded during the Summer of 1999,  and now again in 2003, on Prospect Avenue.  Such noise levels produced by  approaching aircraft at less than 400 feet (by Ms. Feldman’s HUMC altitude  calculation) above Hiller School exceed even the "recommended" noise levels of  departing aircraft 1.9 nautical miles from TEB. 

An objective and accurate environmental impact statement is needed that will  assess the safety of low-flying approaching aircraft over  HUMC and calculate  the actual day/night noise level now that ILS-19 is operating.  Such an  environmental assessment will undoubtedly show that HUMC is within the 65dB noise  contour, a noise level unacceptable for a hospital.  Again, these current data  should at least force an immediate restriction of flights using TEB to within  the 170,000 allowed by the FONSI until a valid and unbiased environmental  assessment can be conducted.

Can you please help us require FAA to finally answer the questions that are  so vital to our well-being and safety?  The administration worries about  medical personnel being decimated by a smallpox attack.  Yet they allow our medical  center to be threatened daily by a more clear and present danger.  I ask that  you please help us take action to stop flights over HUMC before a tragedy like  that in Connecticut occurs in New Jersey, with a corporate jet cart wheeling  into the medical center.

Yours truly,

Dr. Richard L. Bruno
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 02, 2005, 09:51:32 AM
Latest story:  PA chief would cut Teterboro air traffic (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzAyNjIz)

Many posts were entered before this one.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Rob Gartner on June 02, 2005, 04:21:57 PM
As usual, Dr. Bruno makes some outstanding points.  There are two points I would like to follow up on.  Both of these points are based on conversations I have had with Port Authority and FAA officials over the last few years.  First, only departing flights are subject to noise restrictions.  Arriving flights (like the ones over the hospital) are not subject to regulations and can never be cited for violation.  Second, FAA internal systems did not, at the time the ILS was approved, account for changes in elevation of the surrounding area when laying out flight paths.  The heights of flight paths were only measured relative to ground level at the runway not relative to buildings the planes would fly over.  The change in elevation between the airport and Hackensack and the height of buildings were simply not figured into the analysis.   I was told that this was going to be corrected in later versions of their analysis but that was too late for ILS 19.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 04, 2005, 11:08:59 AM
COALITION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH & SAFETY MEETING

Monday, June 13, 2005  -  7:30PM
Hasbrouck Heights Borough Hall
Senior Center - Main Level
320 Boulevard, Hasbrouck Heights

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND THIS MEETING

TOPICS OF DISCUSSION:

1        May 31, 2005 Crash at Teterboro Airport; Red Neck Road/Moonachie Road - Twin Engine plane on approach - no deaths - pilot sustained injury

2        Petition to FAA for Rulemaking Changes with regard to Teterboro  Airport

3        Plan of action - Support of elected officials with regard to capping Teterboro Airport's operations, do we need more?
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 06, 2005, 09:53:35 AM
Latest stories:

The widening mess at Teterboro (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyNjMmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY3MDM2MDUmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk5)

Calls for leaner Teterboro get louder (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzA0MTM4JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)

Here's a novel way to cut Teterboro Airport flights (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyNjcmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY3MDQwMjQmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk5)

Your views (6/6/05) Opinion from Hackensack Residents (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkxNCZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NjcwMzYwMw==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 16, 2005, 08:53:13 AM
Latest story: Taming Teterboro (http://www.bergen.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzOTcmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY3MDgwMDgmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkxNA==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 18, 2005, 10:33:08 AM
Latest story: Senate hearing to focus on flight volume at Teterboro Airport (http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--teterboroflights0617jun17,0,2799866.story?coll=ny-region-apnewjersey)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 21, 2005, 09:39:11 AM
Latest stories:

Plans Made to Ease Teterboro Traffic and Study Airport Capacity (http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/21/nyregion/21teterboro.html) (NY Times article - Requires free registration.)

For common sense at Teterboro Airport (http://www.bergen.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk0MDImZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY3MDk2ODImeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk5)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 23, 2005, 09:58:13 AM
Latest stories:

Hit 'em in the wallet (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzExNjcz)

Lower the air pressure (http://www.nj.com/opinion/ledger/editorials/index.ssf?/base/news-0/1119506221267140.xml&coll=1)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on July 14, 2005, 10:04:36 AM
Latest story:

FAA seeks $1.8 million from company that operated plane in Teterboro crash (http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/news/12127189.htm)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on July 17, 2005, 03:07:04 PM
Latest story:

FAA nixes plan for fewer flights at Teterboro (http://www.bergen.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzIzMzczJnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on July 27, 2005, 11:17:13 PM
Latest story:

Stewart pitches Teterboro overflow (http://www.midhudsonnews.com/News/SWF_Teterboro-27Jul05.htm)
Title: FAA probes charter safety issue
Post by: Editor on August 01, 2005, 09:27:35 PM
Latest story: FAA probes charter safety issue (http://msnbc.msn.com/id/8783240/)

The article says:

"The Teterboro crash raised the ugly specter that people are setting up a situation where they are purporting to operate under the regulations, but they're not"
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 23, 2005, 12:15:40 PM
Latest story: Schumer urges Port Authority to divert air traffic from Teterboro Airport to Stewart (http://www.midhudsonnews.com/News/SWF_Schumer-22Aug05.htm)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 28, 2005, 10:26:26 PM
Just so you know who's using Teterboro:

Airport in N.J.

Most corporate fixed-wing aircraft headed to the Big Apple land at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey. From there to Manhattan can be a long drive through the congestion, but in a helicopter, it's about six minutes.

Choppers may look wickedly expensive to the ordinary person, but to a high-flying, highly paid executive in a hurry, they're just another business expense. Speed saves time; time is money.

Altieri puts the cost question into perspective, pointing to pay rates for executives.

"If you figure out what the chairman makes per hour, a helicopter is not unreasonable," he said.

Let's see. Samuel Palmisano, chairman and CEO of IBM Corp., made $14.4 million from all types of compensation, according to calculations by Forbes magazine. If you assume a 60-hour week, that would come to $4,615 an hour. So, if a chopper flight saved Palmisano an hour, which it easily could, it would be worth it.


Click here for source (http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050828/BUSINESS/508280343/1003).
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 01, 2005, 10:11:21 AM
Latest story: A Sharp Increase in Reports of Planes Flying Too Close (http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/01/nyregion/01miss.html)
Title: Plane Crash near TEB
Post by: Editor on September 03, 2005, 12:44:01 AM
Latest story: Cessna crash kills one near Teterboro (http://www.nynewsday.com/news/local/transportation/nyc-plane0903,0,6191783.story?coll=nyc-homepage-breaking2) (Plane struck the South Hackensack Post Office). 

One dead in small-plane crash (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzYwMzY0) (Record Article)

For anyone who is counting, that's the fourth crash this year.

On Feb. 2, a twin-jet corporate plane with 11 people aboard ran off the end of a runway after an aborted takeoff, crossed a busy highway and slammed into a warehouse, injuring 20 people.

A month later, two passengers and two crew members walked away uninjured when another business plane overshot a runway and got stuck in snow and mud.

In May, a pilot was injured when a small, twin-engine turboprop crashed and burst into flames while landing.


Source (http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/news/12548989.htm)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport stealth expansion
Post by: ericmartindale on September 03, 2005, 10:06:30 AM
Almost nobody realizes that the airport is undergoing a major STEALTH expansion project. They are doing this secretly, while everyone is focussed on the new for barriers and the frequency of night-time flights.

They are lengthening the runways and building huge new terminals in the southern part of their property. The runways are being lengthened under the guise of the "protection" system that will stop a plane from barrelling off the end of the runway and over the highway. It's all part of the same project. The runway that causes the flight path over the western side of Hackensack is being lengthened on its SOUTHERN end. They are even relocating Redneck Avenue to accomodate the expansion. How many people in Hackensack know about this ---- almost nobody.

I addressed this issue to the Freeholders 2 months ago, but they acted like I didn't know what I was talking about. The bottom line is the longer that runway is, ultimately it will handle larger planes coming and going over the west side of Hackensack. And the huge new terminals simply mean there will be an increased volume too.  All us people who think we're making progress are being fooled. Because of this stealth expansion project under construction as we speak, there will be more and larger planes in the future.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 04, 2005, 11:31:24 AM
Latest story:  Police ID pilot killed in crash (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzY0NTgw)

"This is a neighborhood where people raise their families," Mary Rose Passaro said as she brushed her daughter Chelsea's hair out of her face. "People need to realize this isn't just an industrial area. You shouldn't have to go to bed at night scared that a jet is going to crash into the side of your house."
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 06, 2005, 07:55:14 PM
COALITION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH & SAFETY
MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT


DATE: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2005
TIME:  7:30 PM
PLACE: HASBROUCK HEIGHTS BOROUGH HALL SENIOR CENTER
320 BOULEVARD, HASBROUCK HEIGHTS

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND THIS MEETING

AGENDA:

- Update on Environmental Impact Study and Anticipated Start Date/Press Event
- Update on plans for Candlelight Vigil
- Update on FAA and Port Authority positions with regard to TEB
- Report on June 20, 2005 Senate Oversight Hearing 9/2/05 Crash
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 11, 2005, 11:16:57 AM
Latest story:  Officials request Teterboro maydays (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk0NSZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Njc2ODAxNSZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTM=)
Title: 9/22: Teterboro Vigil
Post by: Editor on September 13, 2005, 05:47:08 PM
Coalition for Public Health & Safety
(A not-for-profit, non-partisan organization)

Please join the Coalition for Public Health & Safety for a
CANDLELIGHT VIGIL


Strawberry Front Parking Lot
1000 Huyler Street & Route 46 West, Teterboro, NJ

Thursday, September 22, 2005, 7:30PM

SEND THE FAA and PORT AUTHORITY A STRONG MESSAGE REGARDING TETERBORO AIRPORT

"Together, we can return quality of life to our communities."

Parking is available just west of Strawberry in the Bergen County Technical School parking lots.  Please carpool, if possible.  Looking forward to seeing you.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 16, 2005, 10:50:11 AM
Latest story:  Report says plane was low on fuel (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzY5ODg1)
Title: Thrus: Candlelight Vigil
Post by: Editor on September 21, 2005, 10:08:25 PM
Coalition for Public Health & Safety
(A not-for-profit, non-partisan organization)

Please join the Coalition for Public Health & Safety for a
CANDLELIGHT VIGIL

Strawberry Front Parking Lot
1000 Huyler Street & Route 46 West, Teterboro, NJ

Thursday, September 22, 2005, 7:30PM

SEND THE FAA and PORT AUTHORITY A STRONG MESSAGE REGARDING TETERBORO AIRPORT

"Together, we can return quality of life to our communities."


Parking is available just west of Strawberry in the Bergen County Technical School parking lots.  Please carpool, if possible.  Looking forward to seeing you.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport Stealth Expansion
Post by: ericmartindale on September 23, 2005, 08:17:18 AM
I've been talking about the "STEALTH EXPANSION" of Teterboro Airport. Well, there it is on page 1 of the Rag today 9/23/05, still is full stealth mode.

Towards the bottom of Page 1 "The Port Authority must first relocate a portion of Redneck Avenue".  [Click here for article (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2MDYmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY3NzU1MDQmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXky)]. This is a seperate project from the arrestor bed near Route 46. The projects are on opposite ends of the same runway, and have nothing to do with each other, except for the fact that the public is being fooled. I went down to their administration building on Moonachie Avenue and saw the plans myself.  This is a grand and epic deception ALMOST unprecedented in Bergen County.

They are lengthening the runway tremendously, and this will ultimately translate into MORE flights and BIGGER planes.

This is the biggest deception against the public of Bergen County since the trustees of the old Hackensack Water Company formed a sister real estate company, owned by the same shareholders, and "sold" over a thousand acres of watershed land to themselves. Why do this?  It was against state law for a water company to develop its watershed lands.  Did they get away with . Yes, after years of protest by the environmental community.  And portions of the lands were "bought back" for preservation at over 100 times the original sale price. Even the County Seat, in its large article on the water company, didn't touch on that controversy, which still rages today. Some of the lands in Old Tappan are still under development pressure. There should have been a full Congressional inquiry, but Bob Torricelli betrayed his constituents and turned a blind eye.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 23, 2005, 09:06:23 AM
Latest stories:

Dozens demonstrate over Teterboro woes (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2Nzc1NTM2)

PA to spend $10M for Teterboro jet barrier (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2MDYmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY3NzU1MDQmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXky)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 24, 2005, 11:13:33 AM
Latest story:  Health, safety issues raised (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2Nzc2MDkx)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 04, 2005, 09:19:17 AM
Latest story: Avoid airport hassle by private jets (http://www.menafn.com/qn_news_story.asp?StoryId=CqZ9BqeidDxmTChjPDMf0zxbSyw5LCW)

Now I ask again:  HOW IN THE WORLD DO WE BENEFIT FROM SOME CORPORATE SNOB WHO REFUSES TO USE A REGULAR AIRPORT?  Teterboro is truly a RICH PERSON'S AIRPORT.

Instead of "$438 round trip from Teterboro to Boston", it should be $2,000.  Excess profits should be used to subsidize our property taxes.  Better still: Just BAR any unnecessary flights that jeopardize our health and safety.  As you can see from the article:

The National Transportation Safety Board says operators of smaller scheduled and nonscheduled planes had 73 crashes that killed 65 people last year, compared with 13 fatalities for all domestic commercial airlines.

ATTN: CHRONICLE, COUNTY SEAT, THE RECORD, ELECTED OFFICIALS:  Let's find out more about "Linear Air, LLC (https://www.linearair.com/RTS/home.aspx)"

I see from Linear's website that rich folks can avoid the "hassle" of the commoner's airport and fly to Martha's Vineyard or Nantucket for $349 one way. Do you think the jerk who uses this service gives a damn about the toll it takes on our environment, health and peace of mind?   

Airport proponents would have us believe that Teterboro brings money into the local economy.  Needless to say, trips to Nantucket do NOTHING to generate Bergen County's economy.  Joyrides at our expense.  Plain and simple.

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 06, 2005, 09:20:20 AM
Latest story: Trial date set for Parsippany man accused of shining a laser at aircraft (http://www.dailyrecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051005/UPDATES01/510050356)

This is nuts.  This guy is obviously not a terrorist.  Slap him with a fine and let him get on with life.

Title: Linear Air, LLC
Post by: Editor on October 06, 2005, 05:23:12 PM
More information on Linear Air:

Alternatives to commercial air (http://www.boston.com/business/articles/2005/10/02/alternatives_to_commercial_air/)

Your Air Taxi Is Almost Ready (http://www.businessweek.com/smallbiz/content/sep2005/sb20050916_272956.htm?chan=db)

Airport Hassles Spur Rise of Private Flights (http://www.airportbusiness.com/article/article.jsp?id=3734&siteSection=3)

Air Taxi Of The Future, Flying Today (http://www.avweb.com/newswire/11_38b/briefs/190632-1.html)

Burbs: Linear Air adds White Plains-Boston route (http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051007/BUSINESS01/510070307/1066/BUSINESS01)

THIS HAS GOT TO STOP.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 06, 2005, 11:30:58 PM
Latest story: The Air Group Expands East Coast Service with New Facility at Teterboro Airport to Serve Private Jet Owners, Charter Customers (http://home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20051006005157&newsLang=en)

"Teterboro is the primary business aircraft hub serving New York City, and our business has been growing steadily here," said Jon Winthrop, CEO and president of The Air Group. "This new venue will provide our clients with the finest private and secure facilities and services."
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 08, 2005, 09:20:27 AM
Latest story:  Teterboro may rate relief from N.Y. airport (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2Nzg4MzIy)

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 11, 2005, 09:07:35 AM
Latest story: Teterboro Looking For Relief (http://www.avweb.com/newswire/11_41a/briefs/190746-1.html)

"Well, you know the airspace is getting crowded when the reliever airport needs a reliever airport. "


Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 12, 2005, 08:27:06 PM
Latest story on Linear Air, LLC: DOT airport study a 'reality check' (http://www.connpost.com/business/ci_3108185)

Linear Air of Massachusetts has been flying eight-passenger planes in the Northeast since August 2004.

"It's going very well," said Dan Lynch, Linear's director of corporate sales.

The company is a hybrid between chartered service and fixed route, he said. Today, it starts a new service, flying between Bedford, Mass., and White Plains, N.Y., according to the company's Web site.

The company sells single-seat deals on its fixed routes on a sliding scale, meaning the more people who fly in the plane, the lower the cost.


Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 13, 2005, 08:58:45 AM
Latest story:  Lawmakers review Teterboro plan (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2NzkxMjQ5)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 14, 2005, 10:18:01 AM
Latest story:

Port Authority and FAA at odds over Teterboro changes (http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-1/112918026017980.xml&coll=1)

Bill would tighten rules for air taxis (http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051014/NEWS02/510140370/1018)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 17, 2005, 09:57:48 AM
Latest story:  Tough talk over Teterboro (http://www.bergen.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzOTcmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY3OTE5ODUmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkxNA==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 18, 2005, 08:59:47 AM
Latest story: BUSINESS JETS BACK AT REAGAN (http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/18/business/18memo.html)

Teterboro is one of 12 airports approved by federal authorities for originating private flights to Reagan, which handled an average of 122 charter and private flights daily before the terrorist attacks.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 29, 2005, 11:17:26 AM
Latest stories: Changes in the air at Teterboro worry Morris (http://www.dailyrecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051028/NEWS01/510280332/1005)

NTSB: Weight May Have Been Issue in Teterboro Runway Overrun (http://www.aero-news.net/index.cfm?ContentBlockID=da6b1f13-dd07-4bf7-82b4-43112b2ac1e5)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on December 26, 2005, 10:01:22 AM
Latest story: NJ sees spike in aviation accidents, deaths in 2005 (http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--aviationaccidents1225dec25,0,1591405.story?coll=ny-region-apnewjersey)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 14, 2006, 11:10:12 AM
Airspace Redesign--More Aircraft Noise For NJ?

On December 20, 2005 the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) released the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Metro Airspace Redesign Project, proposing a restructuring of flight patterns throughout the metropolitan area.  We have preliminarily reviewed the DEIS and have significant concerns about the proposals and the FAA development process.

1) The FAA excluded environmental considerations (both noise and emissions mitigation) from the project “Purpose and Need” statement of goals, despite clear public direction that these are the number one concerns.

2) The FAA developed the route changes with extensive aviation industry, but not public or environmental regulatory agency participation, resulting in aviation industry bias.

The FAA is proposing increasing (fanning) departure patterns for Newark Airport and revamping and increasing the departure and arrival configurations throughout the area.  The FAA’s proposals could affect the following New Jersey counties and residents with an INCREASE IN AIRCRAFT NOISE as follows: Bergen, 98,714 people; Gloucester, 30,500; Morris and Sussex, 40,596; Union, 65,570*.  Only the Ocean routing proposal reduces aircraft noise resulting in a net reduction in noise for 112,264 residents.  Please note that the FAA stated that this alternative is not consistent with the Redesign’s “Purpose and Need”.

Further information is posted in the DEIS section on our Internet site at www.njcaan.org.  Please consult this site for our analysis of the DEIS, plus the preliminary schedule of FAA public meetings.  WE URGE YOU TO EVALUATE HOW THE ROUTE CHANGES WILL AFFECT YOUR COMMUNITY AND ATTEND AT LEAST ONE OF THE FAA PUBLIC MEETINGS.

Robert Belzer
President, NJCAAN

*Aircraft noise impacts represent the Integrated Airspace proposal with the Integrated Control Complex.  (See section 4 of the DEIS.)

The DEIS is available at: http://www.faa.gov/nynjphl_airspace_redesign/
Title: TEB: Another Crash!
Post by: Editor on January 17, 2006, 10:40:39 PM
Latest story:  Faulty landing shuts Teterboro (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk0NSZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Njg2MTc3NSZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTM=)

A twin-engine plane's nose gear collapsed as it landed at Teterboro Airport on Monday evening, forcing officials to close the airport for an hour...

"The situation is out of control," Codey said, referring to several...accidents in 2005.


I saw a bumper sticker yesterday that said "If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention."  All it takes is a glance at recent Teterboro headlines to know that this airport needs to go.  All articles can be read here (http://www.hackensacknow.com/teterboro.html) (under "Teterboro Airport News").

Teterboro, Airport for Elite, Jammed 'Beyond Belief'
Faulty landing shuts Teterboro
NJ sees spike in aviation accidents, deaths in 2005
Tough talk over Teterboro
Lawmakers review Teterboro plan
Health, safety issues raised
PA to spend $10M for Teterboro jet barrier
Dozens demonstrate over Teterboro woes
Report says plane was low on fuel
Officials request Teterboro maydays
Police ID pilot killed in crash
One dead in small-plane crash
A Sharp Increase in Reports of Planes Flying Too Close
Towns being reimbursed for jet mishap
Joyride shows safety lapses
Hit 'em in the wallet
Senate hearing to focus on flight volume at Teterboro Airport
Taming Teterboro
The widening mess at Teterboro
Calls for leaner Teterboro get louder
Here's a novel way to cut Teterboro Airport flights
PA chief would cut Teterboro air traffic
Pilot hurt as crippled craft misses runway and burns
Crash injures pilot, renews fear
Teterboro needs its own security force, lawmakers say
Teterboro Airport could get safety barriers by 2007
PA wants tougher rules at Teterboro
FAA working on clearer chart for Teterboro pilots
Covering fear with flowers
Teterboro pilots get told: Pay attention!
Troubling uses for Teterboro
Now hear this: School near Teterboro will be soundproofed
FAA warns Teterboro pilots
Mishap roils airport critics
Jet skids off runway at Teterboro
PA to keep soundproofing schools near N.J. airports
Coveted air study to begin at airport
Criticism of Teterboro intensifies after jet crash
Ill-fated jet pulled from warehouse
Teterboro neighbors face greater threats
Jet crash probe focuses on icing
Teterboro jet crashes
Plane crashes into warehouse
Private Jet Crashes Near Teterboro, NJ Airport-Report
N.J. man charged with shining laser at airplane
Piece falls from plane after takeoff
N.J.'s crowded airspace adds to crash risk, experts say
Small jet headed for Texas made an emergency landing at Teterboro Airport
Bergen schools to get $1M for soundproofing
Teterboro pollution study hits new snag
Web site turns your PC into an eye on the sky
Turbulent skies
Safeguards limit 'runway incursions'
Crowded skies increasingly unfriendly over the area
Fat cats are left cooling their jets
Bush signs ban of Boeing 737s at Teterboro
The Battle Over Teterboro: From Romance to Hostility
What it's like to live in airport flight path
Law closes loophole, clips wings at airport
Public charters banned at Teterboro
Corporate jet aborts takeoff at Teterboro
Air power: Lobbyists challenge Teterboro
PA refuses to upgrade Teterboro
Voters will decide on role in suit
State to fund Teterboro air study
House acts to ban big jets at Teterboro
Senators secure provision limiting jets at Teterboro
PA girding for battle over 737s at Teterboro
Charter flights set off furor around Teterboro
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 31, 2006, 09:01:48 AM
Latest story: Teterboro, Airport for Elite, Jammed 'Beyond Belief' (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=aPEykK4JrjIM&refer=us)

Please read the article, or just read the quotes below.  Residents who live in the affected communities have allowed the rich to take their rights to health and safety for the sake of convenience.  This airport does not contribute the economic vitality of the region nearly enough to justify the risks.

"This is a VIP airport,'' said airport manager Lanny Rider, adding that actor Harrison Ford kept three planes there. "Every big executive, celebrity or sports star at some point will come through Teterboro.''

"You can barely find the room to let the ramp down,'' said Michael Jackson, chief executive officer at AutoNation Inc. Teterboro is "jammed beyond belief.''

"If it gets any worse, we'll rethink using the airport,'' said William Parrett, global chief executive officer of New York- based Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu. Deloitte doesn't own any aircraft though sometimes charters. "If you can't leave or come back when you want, it takes away the reason you use a private aircraft.''
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 02, 2006, 09:19:58 AM
Latest story: Congressman (Loudly) Threatens FAA Over TEB (http://www.avweb.com/newswire/12_05b/briefs/191503-1.html)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 10, 2006, 11:28:23 PM
ACS to Cut 1,700 Jobs, Former CEO Gets $4 Million Payout (http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=179103358&subSection=Columns)

The firm, DDH Aviation, has fallen under the scrutiny of the Federal Aviation Administration as part of an investigation into a February 2005 crash at New Jersey's Teterboro Airport that injured 20 people. ...

In February 2005, a corporate jet owned by DDH Aviation barreled off the runway at New Jersey's Teterboro airport and into a warehouse, injuring a total of 20 people. The FAA cited the company operating the plane at the time, Platinum Jet Management, for failing to meet industry safety standards.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 15, 2006, 09:35:08 AM
Related story:  NetJets is hiring 280 more pilots (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyOSZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Njg3OTg2NSZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTI=)

Gary Hart, vice president of flight operations for NetJets, said Monday that probably more than 100 of the new pilots are destined for Teterboro, which is one of the company's busiest airports.


Is it possible for this airport to handle any more traffic???
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 24, 2006, 09:50:05 AM
Latest story:  Airport grants to provide peace, quiet for schools (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2ODg1MjY4)
Title: Teterboro Mishap
Post by: Editor on March 04, 2006, 12:21:21 PM
Latest story:  Private jet gets stuck in mud at Teterboro (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk0NyZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Njg5MDI3MSZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTM=)

Teterboro incident generates new calls for airport safety
(http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-2/114145236151910.xml&coll=1)
Title: TEB: Air Quality Presentation
Post by: Editor on March 06, 2006, 05:19:46 PM
The COALITION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH & SAFETY is pleased to host

AIR QUALITY STUDY PRESENTATION
- TETERBORO AIRPORT -
presented by
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection in conjunction with
Environ Corporation

MONDAY - MARCH 13, 2006
7:30 PM

Hasbrouck Heights Borough Hall
Senior Center - 1st Floor
320 Boulevard, Hasbrouck Heights, NJ

The presentation will also be attended by representatives of The Port Authority of NY & NJ and the NJ Meadowlands Commission.

For directions or questions, please contact:
Councilman Craig Lahullier (201-460-1403) or
Councilwoman Carol Skiba (212-596-9457 or 201-288-7448)
Title: TEB: Comp. Glitch
Post by: Editor on March 08, 2006, 11:12:44 AM
Latest story: Software glitch puts air traffic on hold (http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-2/11417983913130.xml&coll=1)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 17, 2006, 09:27:35 AM
Morgan Freeman Back In The Air (http://www.aero-news.net/index.cfm?ContentBlockID=d8af8eb1-cf1e-4276-aaf5-9cc0c8ca82c8)

Freeman was busted in late 2004 for an altitude deviation while flying though the very busy and very demanding airspace around friendly Teterboro airport.

"They wanted to give me a 90-day suspension. I said, `I'm just learning how to fly and 90 days is too long not to fly.' My lawyers got involved and they agreed on a 45-day suspension and asked me when I would like to take them."


I wonder how many other beginner, low-flying celebrities we have joyriding over our homes.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 22, 2006, 09:26:09 AM
Latest story: FAA will air 4 flight plans (http://www.nj.com/news/gloucester/index.ssf?/base/news-1/1143018906307210.xml&coll=8)

The FAA introduced four preliminary airspace redesign proposals in December, after a six-year study to relieve congestion and prepare for future growth at the Philadelphia International, John F. Kennedy International, LaGuardia, Newark Liberty International, Teterboro and 16 smaller airports.


"future growth?" What future growth??
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 24, 2006, 12:11:22 PM
FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION
AREA AIRSPACE REDESIGN
PUBLIC MEETING
THURSDAY – APRIL 6, 2006
6:30PM to 9:00PM

Holiday Inn, Route 17 South
Hasbrouck Heights
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 29, 2006, 08:58:51 AM
FAA questioned on plans to shift takeoff patterns (http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/business/14209408.htm)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 02, 2006, 10:59:34 AM
Latest story: For some travelers, it's the only way to fly (http://www.bergen.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2OTEwMjg0JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)

"I generally think the terrorists do something new each time," said Bruce Schneier, a security technology consultant and author. "It is a big hole in the system."
Title: TEB Whistle Blower
Post by: Editor on April 03, 2006, 12:51:13 AM
This showed up on AVWeb (http://www.avweb.com/news/avmail/191897-1.html)

ATC Staffing

I am a controller at TEB airport [Teterboro, N.J.]. There are many times where there are only two controllers in the Tower because we are short staffed, and management does not want to call in overtime to make up staffing. We are supposed to have five positions open but only have two on certain days. They usually combine Local, Ground control, and CIC [controller in charge]. The local controller should be focusing on the runways and the aircrafts in the air. With the positions combined the Local controller now has to worry about the aircraft on taxiways has well. Sometime you have controllers staying in the Tower the whole day without a break.

This is a safety issue to all the flying public. This can also cause delays and have aircraft burning fuel on the ground when they should be flying. Safety is what we should focus on, not on how much management can cut back and get away with it. The FAA is going to continue this way until the flying public has had enough or something happens.

Name withheld by request
Title: TEB Lawsuit
Post by: Editor on April 04, 2006, 09:54:51 AM
Latest story: Teterboro crash victim seeks millions in lawsuit (http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-2/11441256508770.xml&coll=1)

The aircraft was owned by Darby Aviation of Muscle Shoals, Ala., and operated by Jet Platinum Management of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

The suit maintains that the flight operated "without ... the re quired certificates, training programs and qualified flight attendants," according to a statement released by the attorney.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 05, 2006, 11:01:19 AM
Latest story: Maine's Torture Connection (http://www.bangornews.com/news/templates/?a=131651)

The New York Times reported last year that a review of Federal Aviation Administration records showed that on Oct. 8, 2002 only one plane flew a route like Mr. Arar described. FAA records show that a 14- passenger Gulfstream jet left Teterboro, N.J. at 5:40 a.m., stopped at Dulles airport outside Washington and then came to Bangor, leaving Bangor at 9:36 bound for Rome. The same plane, identified by its tail number, went to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where the United States is holding hundreds of suspected terrorists, in December 2003, according to the Times.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 05, 2006, 09:21:03 PM
Teterboro resumes Cape Cod flights (http://www.bergen.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2MDgmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTY5MTE0MzgmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkz)

Wonderful. I'm sure air traffic control is ready.

This showed up on AVWeb

ATC Staffing

I am a controller at TEB airport [Teterboro, N.J.]. There are many times where there are only two controllers in the Tower because we are short staffed, and management does not want to call in overtime to make up staffing. We are supposed to have five positions open but only have two on certain days. They usually combine Local, Ground control, and CIC [controller in charge]. The local controller should be focusing on the runways and the aircrafts in the air. With the positions combined the Local controller now has to worry about the aircraft on taxiways has well. Sometime you have controllers staying in the Tower the whole day without a break.

This is a safety issue to all the flying public. This can also cause delays and have aircraft burning fuel on the ground when they should be flying. Safety is what we should focus on, not on how much management can cut back and get away with it. The FAA is going to continue this way until the flying public has had enough or something happens.

Name withheld by request
Title: TEB: Rothman
Post by: Editor on April 08, 2006, 11:09:58 AM
For Immediate Release: April 6, 2006

Contact: Kimberly Allen, (202) 226-8364

Congressman Steve Rothman's Statement on the FAA Airspace Redesign Project

On April 6, a public meeting on the NY/NJ/PA Metropolitan Airspace Redesign Project is taking place in Hasbrouck Heights, NJ. Rep. Steve Rothman's (D-NJ) statement follows:

"It is clear from the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ignored New Jersey's main concern for airspace redesign: noise abatement. The Congress directed the FAA to consider both noise abatement and ocean routing in their plan for the New York/New Jersey/Philadelphia Metropolitan Area Airspace Redesign. Instead of taking the Congress and New Jerseyans seriously, the FAA decided to make the lives of an estimated 500,000 people more difficult by significantly increasing the amount of noise that already erodes the quality of life for those of us who hear planes flying over our homes and places of work around the clock.
"Northern New Jersey will be impacted the most by the proposed redesign plans. The towns of Rutherford and Fair Lawn, in my district, are expected to be significantly effected with increased noise from the FAA's proposals. In addition, according to the DEIS, the rest of my constituents will get absolutely no reprieve from the level of noise they hear now.
"I do not believe that the FAA cares in any meaningful way about noise abatement or the quality of life of the people living beneath their airspace.
"I reject the DEIS for Airspace Redesign and I will do everything I can to try and force the FAA back to the drawing board for a new approach that seriously addresses noise abatement. For far too long New Jerseyans have suffered because of the deafening noise of planes overhead, therefore I demand that any plan to alter our airspace seriously address the issue of noise. I urge my constituents to join me in making their opposition to the FAA's proposals known by submitting their comments directly to the FAA."

Release Internet Link: http://www.house.gov/rothman/news_releases/2006/apr6_airspaceredesign.htm (http://www.house.gov/rothman/news_releases/2006/apr6_airspaceredesign.htm)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 10, 2006, 12:41:54 AM
Latest story:  NO RUSH, NO MUSH (http://www.nypost.com/business/64163.htm)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 16, 2006, 11:07:21 AM
Latest story: Jet set economy (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2OTE3NDQ5JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 25, 2006, 09:56:39 AM
Latest story:  A lessen plan for aircraft noise (http://www.bergen.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2OTI0Nzg3JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mw==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 30, 2006, 08:40:48 PM
Latest story:  More planes, more noise (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk1JmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2OTI4MDg4JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 10, 2006, 09:56:43 AM
Latest story: Corporate Execs Use Company Planes As Their Own (http://freeinternetpress.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=6847)

The allure of a private plane waiting at a private hangar at a small airport, like Teterboro in New Jersey, can be great. Many executives negotiate their exit packages to keep the perk as long as possible.

Again, this is why you can't have a conversation with your children in your own backyard.  Joe Corporate needs to see the world.  Now he has a golden parachute and a plane. 
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 28, 2006, 09:18:26 PM
Latest story:  Mayors unhappy with airspace plan (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2OTM4NzMz)

Responses to article: More Views (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkxNCZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Njk0MDA4OQ==)

The FAA is deaf to the safety of New Jerseyans. It seems more concerned with money, the "very large percentage of gross national product that comes from aviation" -- the words of Steve Kelley, the FAA's acting manager of the Eastern Region airspace.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 31, 2006, 09:34:31 AM
Latest story:  Airspace proposal comment extended (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2OTQxOTI5JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 06, 2006, 10:00:26 AM
Latest story: Groups press FAA to cut jet noise (http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060606/NEWS/606060343/-1/NEWS01)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 08, 2006, 09:55:38 AM
Latest story:  Stewart's new vision (http://www.recordonline.com/archive/2006/08/08/business-tlmica-08-08.html)

In recent months, Stewart has been trying to woo more private and corporate jet traffic from often-crowded Teterboro Airport in New Jersey.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 12, 2006, 12:10:00 PM
Latest story:  Interest surges in use of private jet flights (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk1JmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2OTc1MTExJnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mw==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 04, 2006, 09:58:57 AM
Latest story:  Air carriers OK Teterboro curfew (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3MDAwNjk1JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)

A message from the Coalition:

TO ALL,

PLEASE WRITE LETTERS TO THE EDITOR OF THE RECORD IN RESPONSE TO TODAY'S ARTICLE.  Note at the beginning of the article the word "voluntary".  Also note, that a 5% reduction will translate to 30 flights off of 600 per day.  Please let the Editor know that you do not use the TEB Noise Complaint Line and what you think of how they have addressed your complaints.  If you have e-mail:  letterstotheeditor@northjersey.com.  Get your letters out there.  Get across the point of what it is like to attempt to have the PA listen and if you perceive them to be a "good" neighbor.  I expect to see lots of letters.

In a Yahoo news clip today "PA has attempted to keep noise complaints at a minimum by keeping a lid on the airport's growth."

We have all been very busy with coordinating the NJMC personal monitor badges with the Environ sampling at TEB.  I want to take this opportunity to THANK ALL OF YOU who have been participating.  We may have some results by the October 9 meeting from the first set of badges, but I cannot be certain.

The meeting will be held in CARLSTADT BORO HALL, 500 Madison Street, Carlstadt - 2nd Floor

AGENDA:

FAA REPLY TO PETITION FOR RECONSIDERATION
NJMC PERSONAL BADGE MONITORING
ROTHMAN PRESS RELEASE
RESIDENT LITIGATION
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 12, 2006, 09:58:14 AM
Latest story:  Teterboro flight accidents (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3MDA0MjU4)

This doesnt' include yesterday's plane crash into an apartment buidling in NYC that orginated from TEB.

Teterboro flight accidents

Some of the crashes involving planes going to and from Teterboro Airport.

Dec. 1, 2005: A twin-engine plane flown by New York philanthropist George F. Baker III, en route from Teterboro, vanished off the coast of Nantucket Island. Baker, believed to be the only person on board, was presumed dead after a search for the plane was called off.

Sept. 2, 2005: A single-engine Cessna crashed into the South Hackensack post office after it missed the Teterboro runway. The pilot was killed, and a student pilot suffered serious injuries.

May 31, 2005: A twin-engine turboprop approaching Runway 1 experienced engine problems before landing and crashed just short of the runway, bursting into flames. The pilot, the only person on board, survived.

Feb. 2, 2005: A Challenger CL-600 jet aborted takeoff, skidded off Runway 6, smashed through the airport fence, hit two cars on Route 46 and crashed into a warehouse. Twenty people were injured.

March 8, 2002: A small plane crashed and exploded in flames shortly after takeoff from Teterboro, killing the pilot and just missing a stream of vehicles on Route 46.

Dec. 9, 1999: A twin-engine Beech Baron bound for Teterboro crashed in the yard of a Hasbrouck Heights home and burst into flames, killing its four occupants.

Jan. 11, 1999: The pilot of a Cessna 310R was killed when his plane, which had left Teterboro bound for Delaware, crashed in a Kearny freight yard.

March 29, 1993: A twin-engine plane crashed in an industrial area of Elmwood Park two minutes after takeoff from Teterboro, killing all six on board.

May 24, 1988: A twin-engine Lear Jet slammed into a West Paterson hillside, killing all four people aboard. The crash occurred roughly two minutes after the plane left Teterboro for a "ferry flight" to Morristown.

Nov. 10, 1985: A small plane and a Teterboro-bound corporate jet collided in the air over Fairview, killing six people, including one on the ground. Thirty-five people were left homeless after the jet destroyed a row of multifamily homes in Cliffside Park. The collision rained wreckage over an eight-block area.

Jan. 19, 1980: A single-engine plane crashed in a Bogota back yard, killing the pilot and passenger.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 13, 2006, 09:36:05 AM
Latest stories:

Crash brings call for more air traffic control
 (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3MDA0NzM0JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)
Teterboro Airport at a glance (http://www.northjersey.com/search_eng_adv.php)

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 19, 2006, 04:36:42 PM
Latest story: A call to secure the skies (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyNjMmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcwMDcyNjEmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk5)

So if you were a terrorist and knew how to fly, you could just take off from Teterboro without registering your flight plan, then head up the East River and divert to a tempting Manhattan target.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 20, 2006, 03:07:07 PM
Latest story: Teterboro Airport now has safer runway (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2MDgmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcwMDgwNDAmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXky)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 26, 2006, 09:20:56 PM
Latest crash: Frightening moment for jet at Teterboro Airport (http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?section=local&id=4696953)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 31, 2006, 10:32:39 PM
Latest story:
NTSB Finds Jet Unbalanced in Teterboro Crash (http://www.1010wins.com/pages/118018.php?contentType=4&contentId=233043)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on November 01, 2006, 07:43:19 PM
Latest stories:

Teterboro Airport & the CIA (http://alexconstantine.blogspot.com/2006/10/lexington-comair-crash-part-5.html)

NTSB Blasts Flight Crew For '05 Teterboro Jet Skid
(http://wcbstv.com/topstories/local_story_304113636.html)

Is Teterboro Airport Safe? (http://snakeoilsam.blogspot.com/2006/11/is-teterboro-airport-safe.html)

The fact is as in all other things American, Cash is King and for that reason alone no real changes will be made in this situation. If money could be spent to improve the situation it would be and has been. But even after the installation of an 8.5 million dollar arrestor pad at the North end and the planned installation of a 12.5 million dollar pad at the South end there is still the high likelihood that at some future point in time an event will take place which will result in the death of someone or perhaps even a greater number of people.

When that day arrives all those who have a voice in the operation of this airport, either on a State, Federal or facility ownership level will have to make account of their actions. It will also be the obligation of the legal profession to demand an accounting of those who will be proven to be accountable.

Perhaps it will take a major lawsuit before anything changes and the people of the region get any form of real justice in regard to the responsible operation of an airport, Teterboro Airport, an airport which has clearly outgrown the ability to exist in a safe environment.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on November 14, 2006, 09:52:33 AM
Latest story: Flying can be unforgiving for not getting it right (http://www.recordonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061114/OPINION/611140303)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on November 28, 2006, 10:02:56 AM
Latest story:  Night skies still busy over Teterboro (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3MDI3ODM3)

"We have to convince each and every single company that operates a plane that [a voluntary curfew] is the right thing to do," said James Coyne, president of the National Air Transportation Association, who is trying to persuade his members to follow the new rules.

Publish the names of all of those companies that don't abide by the voluntary curfew.  We'll stop buying their goods and services.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on November 29, 2006, 06:38:22 PM
Latest story: TEB Working Group Town Hall Meeting Generates Renewed Interest In Effort Between Airport Users/Operators And Surrounding Community (http://www.rotor.com/Default.aspx?tabid=510&newsid905=53363)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on November 30, 2006, 10:40:49 AM
Latest story:  Wrong place for a layover (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk5JmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3MDI4NjE2)

Homeowners in Hackensack, Hasbrouck Heights, East Rutherford, Teaneck and Bogota merely want some evidence that Teterboro is behaving reasonably. But is it reasonable to allow Connecticut-based military jets to touch down one day, then scramble the next as if they were responding to an enemy attack?
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on December 05, 2006, 10:32:10 PM
Latest story: Imperial Jets Arranges Tom Watson Private Jet Charter Flight on Lear 45 (http://golf-digest.diacot3.com/22262/)

Imperial Jets arranged private jet travel for legendary golfer, Tom Watson, following the Manhattan Golf Classic on Governor's Island, last Sunday. Watson flew out of New Jersey's Teterboro Airport on a Lear 45 after teaming up with Donald Trump to defeat Golf Digest's #1 female Golfer, Annika Sorenstam, and golf poster girl, Natalie Gulbis in a pro-am skins game.

It's nice to know that ordinary local folk like us benefit so much from Teterboro Airport.  The "Golf Classic" is certainly worth all of the noise, air pollution and risk of yet another crash. 
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 09, 2007, 09:30:09 AM
Latest stories:

N.J. legislators call for change in flight path (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3MDU0NDMz)

NJ Flight Plan Change Requested
(http://www.harnesslink.com/www/Article.cgi?ID=47081)

That Charter Jet Is Available, but How Good Is the Pilot? (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/09/business/09road.html?_r=1&oref=slogin)

Tower was unaware plane's danger
(http://www.tribune-democrat.com/homepage/local_story_009000929.html?keyword=leadpicturestory)

Pilot Maureen McGee and nurse Diane Efaw, 47, were killed instantly. Both were employed by Flight Source LLC of Morgantown, W.Va. The medical flight was en route to Teterboro Airport in New Jersey to pick up a patient for further transport.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 25, 2007, 09:41:19 AM
Latest story: 4th Major Hub for Air Traffic Moves Ahead (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/25/nyregion/25airport.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion&oref=slogin)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 28, 2007, 04:45:50 PM
Latest story: Port Authority votes to buy Stewart Airport (http://www.midhudsonnews.com/News/SWF_PA_buys-25Jan07.htm)

DeCota said Stewart’s infrastructure is geared for growth with its two runways, a seven gate terminal, two fixed base operators, corporate facilities and a new hotel under construction. The airport could also accommodate some of the corporate business from Teterboro Airport in New Jersey, he said.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 01, 2007, 04:31:03 PM
Latest story: Stewart airport part of NYC airport network (http://www.jetsettersblog.com/blog/2007/02/01/stewart-airport-part-of-nyc-airport-network/)

“In addition to relieving traffic at the area’s three major airports, Stewart Airport could play a key role in the Port Authority’s effort to reduce to reduce flight movements at [private aviation hub] Teterboro Airport,” the release added.
Title: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 15, 2007, 08:34:53 AM
Latest story: Teterboro Closed After Plane Slides Off Runway (http://www.myfoxny.com/myfox/pages/News/Detail?contentId=2385291&version=1&locale=EN-US&layoutCode=TSTY&pageId=3.2.1)
Title: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 16, 2007, 08:49:26 AM
Latest news: New Jersey lawmakers approve Stewart Airport buy (http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--stewartairport0315mar15,0,675126.story?coll=ny-region-apnewjersey)

New Jersey legislators hope Stewart will also ease congestion at Bergen County's Teterboro Airport, which has become one of the nation's busiest smaller airfields.
Title: Jet Noise
Post by: Editor on April 07, 2007, 10:14:18 AM
Latest story:  FAA drafts plan to cut jets' noise (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3MTA2NjE5JnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)
Title: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 13, 2007, 10:53:48 PM
Latest story: Passenger Jet Goes Off Runway at Teterboro; No One Hurt (http://www.myfoxny.com/myfox/pages/News/Detail?contentId=2924540&version=1&locale=EN-US&layoutCode=TSTY&pageId=3.1.1)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 06, 2007, 08:56:19 PM
Latest story: Codey signs Stewart Airport legislation (http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates/2007/05/codey_signs_stewart_airport_le.html)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 13, 2007, 08:56:02 AM
Latest story: Flying high, but still grounded (http://www.hudsonreporter.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=18334467&BRD=1291&PAG=461&dept_id=523587&rfi=6)
Title: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 14, 2007, 09:07:12 AM
Latest story:  Aviation agency fails to clear the air (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkxNCZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NzE1MTIxNA==)

The FAA is deaf to the noise and blind to the danger of jets flying over the Hackensack Heights, and now through the Pascack Funnel, apparently more concerned, as the FAA's Kelley said in 2005, with the "very large percentage of gross national product that comes from aviation."

Those of us in the Hackensack Heights and Pascack Funnel will live with increasing fear as more planes roar overhead into Newark and Teterboro airports. This fear will multiply as more mishaps occur around Teterboro Airport and we learn more about the FAA's dirty little secrets: Its interest in the gross national product instead of New Jerseyans' quality of life -- or their lives -- its concocted reports and its failure to enforce its own regulations.


Complain louder: http://faa.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/faa.cfg/php/enduser/ask.php
Title: TEB: Close call
Post by: Editor on June 20, 2007, 09:34:31 AM
Latest story:

Close Call On TEB Runways This Weekend (http://www.aero-news.net/index.cfm?ContentBlockID=f7ba9ede-36a1-4b03-8d78-64ad0b563dd4)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 22, 2007, 08:36:19 AM
Collision avoided by 50 feet at Teterboro Airport (http://www.philly.com/philly/wires/ap/news/state/new_jersey/8129102.html) (same incident as above post)
2 planes nearly collide at Teterboro (http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates/2007/06/2_planes_nearly_collide_at_tet.html)

"The tower controller stated that he did not see the incursion, so he did not cancel either takeoff clearance," the NTSB report said.

This showed up on AVWeb (http://www.avweb.com/news/avmail/191897-1.html) in August of 2006:


ATC Staffing

I am a controller at TEB airport [Teterboro, N.J.]. There are many times where there are only two controllers in the Tower because we are short staffed, and management does not want to call in overtime to make up staffing. We are supposed to have five positions open but only have two on certain days. They usually combine Local, Ground control, and CIC [controller in charge]. The local controller should be focusing on the runways and the aircrafts in the air. With the positions combined the Local controller now has to worry about the aircraft on taxiways has well. Sometime you have controllers staying in the Tower the whole day without a break.

This is a safety issue to all the flying public. This can also cause delays and have aircraft burning fuel on the ground when they should be flying. Safety is what we should focus on, not on how much management can cut back and get away with it. The FAA is going to continue this way until the flying public has had enough or something happens.

Name withheld by request

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 16, 2007, 10:22:25 PM
Latest story:  Fire briefly closes Teterboro Airport (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk0NSZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NzE4MjYyMSZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTM=)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 05, 2007, 07:42:59 PM
MEETING  NOTICE

Please note that the Coalition for Public Health and Safety meeting will be held Monday September 10th at the Carlstadt Borough Hall located at 500 Madison Street Carlstadt.  The meeting starts at 7:00 PM sharp.  Please try to attend this meeting. Air space re-design, the air quality study, attending the County Freeholder meeting on the 19th of September, and a re-organization of The Coalitions Officers will be among the topics for this meeting.  These are all important items and your attendance at this meeting would be appreciated.

Thank You
                                                                                                                                                           Co-Chairman
Craig Lahullier
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 08, 2007, 10:40:54 AM
Latest story: There Is Plenty of Airspace (http://www.flyingmag.com/article.asp?section_id=12&article_id=838)

See "Facing Up to Carbon Pollution" in this article which discusses "carbon credits".  Interesting.

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 10, 2007, 08:18:41 AM
Record Editorial:  Planes have to fly, even over Pascack Valley (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkxNCZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NzE5MjEzOQ==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 20, 2007, 09:33:54 AM
Latest story:  Bergen will sue FAA to fight jet noise from rerouting plan (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2MDcmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcxOTc0NTImeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkz)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 27, 2007, 09:42:34 AM
Latest story:  Teterboro's NetJets pledges to fly cleaner (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk2MDgmZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcyMDAzNjYmeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkyMg==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 21, 2007, 10:30:37 AM
Latest story:  New Jersey Ferris Wheel Rejected By FAA (http://www.aero-news.net/index.cfm?ContentBlockID=ed708619-9d60-45b4-bba2-4e175b65a3a9)

(Just another example of how Teterboro Airport cramps our style).
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on November 02, 2007, 10:06:52 AM
Latest story:  Stewart may ease Newark delays (http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVsN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3MjE2MDMyJnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5Mg==)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 22, 2008, 10:53:28 AM
Disaster Approaching (http://www.nypost.com/seven/01192008/news/regionalnews/disaster_approaching_995455.htm)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 08, 2008, 10:27:50 AM
HUCK PRESS PLANE: EMERGENCY LANDING (http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2008/02/07/645841.aspx)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 09, 2008, 07:07:32 PM
NJ DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

presents

TETERBORO AIRPORT

AIR QUALITY STUDY

by Environ Corporation

Funded by THE PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK & NEW JERSEY and

THE NEW JERSEY MEADOWLANDS COMMISSION

FEBRUARY 11, 2008 - 7:30 PM

HENRY P. BECTON REGIONAL
HIGH SCHOOL

107 Paterson Avenue, East Rutherford, NJ

Hosted by THE COALITION for PUBLIC HEALTH & SAFETY

For further information, contact:  Craig Lahullier 201-460-1403,
Carol J. Skiba 201-681-2402, or Joel Brizzi 201-460­8379

DIRECTIONS:  Route 17 South to Hoboken Road make first left onto Enoch Street (1 block); make right onto Paterson Avenue;** make left at light onto Hackensack Street (1 block); make first left onto Ann Street; make left onto Francis Street into Becton parking lot.--- Route 17 North to Paterson Avenue Exit (after Lowes) at light make left onto Paterson Avenue continue as above**.
Title: TEB Air Quality Report
Post by: Editor on February 12, 2008, 10:34:19 AM
Study uncovers harmful air around Teterboro Airport (http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-9/12027963569540.xml&coll=1)

Anyone who reads this should be outraged. 

Special interests (rich corporate snobs and celebrities) have been stealing your right to the peaceful, healthy enjoyment of your environment.  Now, it's proof positive.  What more do we need? This airport needs to be closed to all but the most essential flying. 

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 29, 2008, 11:01:42 PM
Air quality study deemed inconclusive (http://hackensackchronicle.com/NC/0/104.html)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 28, 2008, 11:31:44 AM
Teterboro Airport ranked high in 'serious close calls' (http://www.newyorkology.com/archives/2008/04/teterboro_airpo.php)

Report: Teterboro Leading Larger Airports in Incursions (http://www.1010wins.com/Report--Teterboro-Leads-Larger-Airports-in-Incursi/2078980)

Teterboro Airport high on near-miss list (http://www.northjersey.com/news/Teterboro_high_on_near-miss_list.html)

The FAA says many controllers have retired, but NATCA says the high level of air traffic traveling through Teterboro scares away many potential hires.

"You've got a deadly combination where you have tired, overworked controllers working at a busy airport," Barbarello said. "I'm just waiting for a call from somebody saying two airplanes crashed and 12 people are dead."
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 03, 2008, 09:11:13 AM
NTSB faults pilot for maneuver that injured flight attendant (http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5h-HQ9bVWzBpBCy3SbLQKlZ220SIAD90DN1Q80)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 05, 2008, 11:19:22 AM
Teterboro leads airports in "serious" incursions (http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080428/NEWS03/804280333/1007)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 11, 2008, 12:24:26 PM
Stressed pilots at Teterboro get help on Web (http://www.northjersey.com/news/transportation/19705769.html)

http://www.airportflightcrewbriefing.com/Teterboro

Title: TEB mishap (again)
Post by: Editor on July 08, 2008, 07:30:31 PM
Controller at Teterboro clears plane for landing with workers on runway (http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2008/07/controller_at_teterboro_clears.html)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 26, 2008, 02:20:03 PM
As use of chartered jets rises, so do accidents (http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/08/26/business/jets.php)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 27, 2008, 10:48:14 AM
Business Jet Crashes Show Rise of Rule-Breaking Charter Brokers
27.08.2008   Seth Lubove

The Bombardier Challenger CL-600 chartered jet carrying employees of New York-based private equity firm Kelso & Co. was barreling down the runway of New Jersey´s Teterboro Airport at almost 127 miles per hour en route to Chicago when the plane failed to lift off.

The pilots hit the brakes and thrust reversers, sending the two-engine jet skidding across U.S. Route 46. It wound up almost halfway inside a clothing warehouse after ramming through the building´s brick wall.

More than three years after the February 2005 crash, which injured all 11 people aboard and three on the ground, controversy is still raging over the charter jet industry and its methods for ferrying well-heeled passengers. The U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are zeroing in on brokers and other intermediaries in the $ 8 billion-a-year U.S. charter business.

These unlicensed, lightly regulated companies don´t fly the planes, much less own them. They make their money by arranging flights and charging as much as 20 percent of a trip´s cost, which can soar to more than 9,000 an hour, according to prices quoted on Teterboro-based Freedom Jets Inc.´s Web site.

In contrast to the luxury trappings of private jets, charter brokering is a bare-knuckle trade in which companies can scramble for profits and poach each other´s clients and employees. The stock promoters for one broker, Austin, Texas-based Connect-A- Jet.com Inc., were sued last March for fraud by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The case was pending as of mid-August.

Read more at Bloomberg.com

Source: http://jets.ru/monitoring/2008/08/27/business_jet

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 29, 2008, 09:31:36 AM
Air Traffic Controllers Prefer Springsteen And Sting Over George Michael

This is the kind of story that makes you wonder about how things operate behind the scenes. I also admit I was a bit amused by this story, and hope the same can be said for my readers. At least the ones who do not consider themselves George Michael fans.

Private Jet As George Michael’s private jet waited for clearance to take off from New Jersey’s Teterboro airport this past Sunday, word came down from controllers that the singing star would not be able to depart on time. After an hour’s delay, Michael’s jet was finally cleared to take off. If he didn’t know what the cause of the delay was at the time, you can be certain he knows now.

It seems that both Sting, frontman for the recently-reunited group The Police, and Bruce Springsteen were also waiting for clearance to depart in their private jets from the very same airport at the very same time.

After dealing first with a weather delay, Michael’s flight to Boston was further delayed two more times when both Sting and Springsteen were cleared to depart ahead of him.

Do you suppose it was Springsteen’s hometown status that gave him priority over Michael? Perhaps it was the fact that he is often called "The Boss," and controllers did not want to mess with the guy who has earned such a moniker.

Considering the fact that Sting’s jet was permitted to depart first — even before hometown boy Bruce — makes me wonder if some key airport controller is a big fan.

It was reported that Michael made it to his show in Boston without a minute to spare, and now has to live down the embarrassment of losing an airport face-off with Sting and Springsteen.

I wonder what the odds are that controllers are rocking to the sounds of "Roxanne" and "Born In The USA" up in that control tower?

This story surfaced on the New York Post’s infamous Page Six.

Source: http://www.realrocknews.com/air-traffic-controllers-prefer-springsteen-and-sting-over-george-michael/
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 29, 2008, 10:44:49 AM
Report blames controller for Teterboro incident
August 29, 2008
NEWARK, N.J. - Investigators fault an air traffic controller for a runway incident at Teterboro Airport last month.

A Cessna was taxiing and about to cross a runway where a small jet was preparing to take off en route to Costa Rica on July 9.

The jet was forced to abort its takeoff. The two planes on the ground came within about 400 yards of each other.

Neither the pilot of the Cessna nor the nine people aboard the small jet suffered injuries.

A report released Friday by the National Transportation Safety Board blames air traffic control for not directing the Cessna to hold short of the runway while taxiing.

The incident occurred two weeks after a plane landed near two workers on a closed runway at Teterboro.

Source: http://www.amny.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--teterboro-runwayi0829aug29,0,1030328.story
__________________

Another story: Controller blamed for Teterboro runway mishap (http://www.philly.com/philly/wires/ap/news/state/new_jersey/20080829_ap_controllerblamedforteterbororunwaymishap.html?text=med&c=y&c=y)

A report released in February by the federal Government Accountability Office found that Teterboro had 23 runway incursions from fiscal 2001 to fiscal 2007, two fewer than nearby Newark Liberty International Airport, which handled more than twice as many flights as Teterboro in the 12 months ending June 30.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 03, 2008, 03:10:52 PM
Ben Verwaayen bans jets as recession hits corporate fleets (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/transport/3130406/Ben-Verwaayen-bans-jets-as-recession-hits-corporate-fleets.html)
By Dominic White

Ben Verwaayen, the former BT boss and self-proclaimed "climate change buff", has clamped down on corporate jets at his new company Alcatel-Lucent.
 
 'Climate change buff' Ben Verwaayen clamps down on corporate jets Photo: PAUL COOPER Executives at the world's biggest provider of fixed-line networks have been told they will have to fly on commercial airlines.

Earlier this year Mr Verwaayen hit out at BT customers who insist on receiving paper telephone bills rather than electronic ones.

But his latest decision is not just an ethical one, it appears. Like many companies, Alcatel-Lucent is cutting costs to cope with tough market conditions - with corporate jets top of the list of luxuries to go.

Alcatel-Lucent will ground its three business jets based at New Jersey's Morristown Municipal Airport when leases on two of them expire at the end of October. "It is our plan to wind down corporate aviation," said a spokesman for the Paris-based company. Even before the credit crunch intensified last month, the jet fleet was "identified as an area we could make some cuts."

About 30 miles away at Teterboro Airport, business flights serving the New York area's corporate-aviation hub are down 5.6% through the first seven months of the year, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

US executive-jet traffic fell 18pc in August alone, JPMorgan analyst Joseph Nadol wrote in a research note. The decline may be a sign that even strong orders from Russia and the Middle East may not prop up growth in the $20bn (£11.3bn) industry.

"A slowdown in traffic is a sign that demand will eventually be slowing as well," said aerospace analyst Raymond Jaworowski of Forecast International. "The business-jet market tracks very closely to US economic growth and corporate profits."
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 29, 2008, 10:42:44 AM
Group outlines progress at Teterboro Airport
source: http://www.southbergenite.com/NC/0/1880.html 
(by Michael Lamendola - October 28, 2008)

A working group that had made five distinct pledges to improve safety and quality of life issues at Teterboro Airport two years ago said it’s making significant strides with fulfilling its promises, yet more cooperation by airport operators is still needed.

The consortium of air industry operators, airport officials and the Port Authority of NY/NJ that makes up the Teterboro Airport Industry Working Group, says safety and noise, two of the top issues posed at the general aviation airport, are being attacked on several fronts.

The five pledges set forth exactly two years ago called for reducing Stage II aircraft flights, reducing nighttime flights by imposing a voluntary 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew, keeping out aircraft 100,000 pounds and over and making safety improvements and security improvements. The group said since the pledges were issued, Stage II operations have decreased by 43 percent, nighttime flights have gone down 16 percent, no oversized jets above 100,000 pounds have landed at Teterboro and the amount of noise complaints received from local residents has decreased from 736 to 468.

The group said on the safety front, a perimeter intrusion system is planned for the end of the year. In addition, a foam arrestor bed has been installed on one runway and another is planned. The group has also launched a Web site with a Safety 1st program, a  20-minute tutorial on how jet users should behave and the rules they need to follow when utilizing Teterboro. The site has been viewed more than 80,000 times since its launch in June.

Congressman Steve Rothman, a strong proponent of improving the quality of life issues in towns near the airport that are adversely affected by the airport’s operations, said he is pleased with the results so far. However, he said more operators need to sign on to commit to the pledges and stick to their promises.

“When the Working Group announced these pledges two years ago, it had just over 50 percent of the operators at Teterboro voluntarily agreeing to abide by these pledges and it set a goal of 90 percent signed up by the end of 2007,” said Rothman. “Unfortunately they have fallen well short of that goal since just over 60 percent of the operators have signed up so far.”
________________________________

October 28, 2008

TEB Good-Neighbor Policy Working
Source: http://www.avweb.com/avwebbiz/news/BizAv_TEB_GoodNeighborPolicay_Working_199073-1.html
By Russ Niles, Editor-in-Chief

Stage II business jet operations have dropped by 43 percent and night operations at Teterboro Airport have been cut by 16 percent since operators instituted a voluntary ban on those types of activities two years ago. At a news conference on Tuesday, representatives of the Teterboro Airport Industry Working Group's "Pledge to the Community Program" updated the media on efforts to ease the friction between the airport and its neighbors. "I am quite pleased with the continued progress of the working group's Pledge to the Community Program," National Air Transportation Association President Jim Coyne said. "The significant reduction in Stage II and overnight operations is a testament to the aviation industry's commitment to this critical initiative." Coyne is also co-chair of the program. There are now 300 signatories on the voluntary ban and the group is urging more to join.

In a letter to operators that use TEB, the group says it's "critical we continue the momentum achieved over the last two years," since the establishment of the effort. In addition to the 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew and the Stage II ban, the group has resolved to ban aircraft weighing more than 100,000 pounds and to enhance safety and security at the airport.
________________________________

Sure, it's noisy, but Teterboro brings big business
Source: http://www.northjersey.com/news/Yes_its_noisy_but_Teterboro_brings_in_business.html
Tuesday, October 28, 2008
BY JOHN GAVINSTAFF WRITER
   
Rep. Steve Rothman, along with officials with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and aviation officials gave a progress report today about quality of life issues near Teterboro Airport.

The report was an update of an informal agreement made two years ago with operators and businesses that use the airport to make a voluntary pledge to scale back their operations for the good of the community.

“Significant progress has been made since 2006 but there is still much more work to be done,” said Rothman, who represents the airport and surrounding communities.

 “Teterboro Airport has been a noisy and somewhat bothersome neighbor for decades, but it is also a neighbor that employs 1,137 people, creates 15,554 other jobs and generates $1.8 billion in annual economic activity in the region," he said. "This is a neighbor we want to keep, as long as we can figure out how best to live next to each other.”

The pact was made after years of complaints from neighbors about the rising number of jet take offs and landings, jet noise and safety concerns.

Held at the Dassault Falcon Jet Corporation’s hanger, Rothman, D-Fair Lawn, said he was pleased with the agreement’s success in cutting down incidents of its noisiest jets and keeping larger planes over 100,000 pounds from operating.

During the 50-minute press conference, Port Authority Chairman Anthony Coscia said Teterboro is a “reliever to other airports” but says help may be on the way with today’s technology.

“We have an airport control system that’s antiquated,” Coscia said. “We need better technology, different approaches.”

Rothman, however, said he is disappointed with the number of participants since the initiative to cut back on operations was announced.

Two years ago, about 50 percent of the airport’s businesses pledged to reduce their operations and a goal was set to have 90 percent do so by the end of 2007.

To date, 60 percent of businesses have pledged.

“Unfortunately, they have fallen well short of that goal… ” Rothman said. “They simply must do better. It is my expectation that the working group will redouble their efforts in this area.”

Good neighbor policy
Pledges made by Teterboro users to reduce the impact of the airport on its neighbors:

Reduce operations of Stage II jets (the noisiest)
Reduce night time flights
Keeping large aircraft from operating at Teterboro
Make safety improvements
Make security improvements

E-mail: gavin@northjersey.com


Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on December 05, 2008, 05:02:11 PM
I found this here: http://www.aviationemployment.com/job-listings/list-jobs.cgi?id=44063

Compliance Manager - Noise Abatement
Aerotek Aviation, LLC - Teterboro, NJ, United States (profile)

Summary
This position administers and oversees the development and operations of a world class noise abatement and Environmental office at Teterboro airport. Respond to complaints, concerns and inquires for the following groups: community residents, aircraft operators, members of special interest groups, locally elected and appointed officials, various government agencies and the Port Authority of NY and NJ staff and supervises departmental staff. This position is to be effective, proactive and innovative. Must have an aviation background with regards to the environmental side of the house. Must be extremely diplomatic as they will be the liaison between the airport and the residents of the area. Will also be dealing with pilots that violate noise policies. This is a direct placement. Relocation assistance for the ideal candidate.

Permanent position
Full-time
Qualifications
ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS, NOISE ABATEMENT KNOWLEDGE, EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION SKILLS, EXCELLENT COMPUTER CUSTOMER SERVICE SKILLS

Compensation / Benefits
Application Instructions
When applying, please reference: 1831255
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on December 11, 2008, 06:05:08 PM
Teterboro Airport noise hotline (http://www.hackensackchronicle.com/NC/0/620.html)
Residents can make noise using hotline

Though some noise has subsided at Teterboro Airport in recent months, Little Ferry resident Corinne Wehrle is making sure her neighbors remain on the ball with quality of life issues.

"Although there are no more noisy jets, we now have larger jets with more fumes," Wehrle said at a recent Little Ferry council meeting. Wehrle, the borough’s representative on the Teterboro Airport Noise Abatement Committee (TANAC), stressed the importance complaining to the airport and the Port Authority of New York/New Jersey about noise and jet fumes.

"It is important that the residents know that when they are complaining about something such as the noise and fumes, the airport takes that into consideration when things are being changed," she said, adding that objections from the residents are always documented by Teterboro personnel.

Earlier this year, the New Jersey Department Environmental Protection [DEP] and the Environ Cooperation completed a study that showed people living in the area of the airport are breathing in air that is more dangerous than the fumes at the airport itself. It also stated that Teterboro Airport has a "measurable impact" on the air quality.

A special airport hotline was established for the sole reason of airing residents’ complaints about their impact environment. The callers have resided in several area towns, not just Little Ferry.

"Having an airport in a residential area is not a desirable situation, so there are going to be complaints," Ridgefield Park Mayor George Fosdick said. Though Fosdick’s town is less than a 10-minute drive along Route 46 from the airport, he said the number of complaints from his residents have been few.

"We have between zero to five per month. There are months that no one complains," he said.

The same is true in Bogota, where Mayor Patrick McHale said the skies have been quiet overhead.

"Rarely do planes fly over Bogota," he said, adding that no one from his town has reported anything via the airport hotline.

The dwindling number of central Bergen residents to use the hotline might have nothing to do with fewer complaints. In Hackensack, where planes buzz high-rise apartment buildings as well as hill-perched Hackensack University Medical Center, numbers are also down. City Manager Stephen Lo Iacono said the airport indeed poses a threat to quality of life, but some residents just might be fed up with the situation.

"Noise, fumes and low flying planes is an absolutely terrible, terrible quality of life issues for the City of Hackensack to put up with because of the location of Teterboro Airport and it is a major issue of the city," said Lo Iacono.

"I am sure there are an awful lot of people that throw their hands up in frustration not being able to do anything about the problem and not calling anymore."

Though low-flying planes and fumes continue, Wehrle and other municipal officials urge residents not to give up.

"Unless people voice their complaints, it will be hard to fix," she said, emphasizing the use of the hotline.

"I am convinced if more people know about the hotline, there would be more complaints," Little Ferry Mayor Mauro Raguseo said. "I urge residents, especially one affected by the airport, to make their voices heard on the hotline."

Residents wishing to complain about noise or fumes or other airport-related issues are encouraged to call the Teterboro Airport hotline at 201-288-8828 or visit www.teb.com. Residents can also email Wehrle at smcpantry@gmail.com with the subject line Airport.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: just watching on December 15, 2008, 10:11:43 AM
When I drive into Hackensack, one of the first things I notice is the roar of planes overhead, it seems like they roar in every 40 seconds, on the dime.  I wasn't paying attention so much when I lived here.  It definately diminishes the quality of life.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: just watching on December 19, 2008, 01:14:42 AM
Check the old minutes of the January 3, 1950 Hackensack Council meeting.  The city passed an ordinance regulating low-flying aircraft.  The measure was pushed by Councilman Myers of the 2nd Ward.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on December 19, 2008, 02:12:21 PM
The ordinance introduction:
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Homer Jones on December 19, 2008, 02:49:08 PM
If that ordinance is still in effect, why not send Constable Norm Levin on to the roof of the Excelsior, take down the tail numbers of the offending aircraft, then rush to Teterboro or Newark Airport and hand a warning to the pilot telling him that he shouldn't do that anymore or he will get a ticket. Problem solved! 
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on December 22, 2008, 12:03:13 AM
AP IMPACT: Wall Street still flying corporate jets
From: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081222/ap_on_bi_ge/meltdown_corporate_jets

NEW YORK – Crisscrossing the country in corporate jets may no longer fly in Detroit after car executives got a dressing down from Congress. But on Wall Street, the coveted executive perk has hardly been grounded.

Six financial firms that received billions in bailout dollars still own and operate fleets of jets to carry executives to company events and sometimes personal trips, according to an Associated Press review.

The jets serve as airborne offices, time-savers for executives for whom time is money — lots of money. And some firms are cutting back, either by selling the planes or leasing them.

Still, Wall Street's reliance of the rarified mode of travel has largely escaped the scorn poured on the Big Three automakers.

Insurance giant American International Group Inc., which has received about $150 billion in bailout money, has one of the largest fleets among bailout recipients, with seven planes, according to a review of Federal Aviation Administration records.

"Our aircraft are being used very sparingly right now," AIG spokesman Nicholas J. Ashooh said. "I'm not saying there's no use, but there's very minimal use."

To cut costs, AIG sold two jets earlier this year and is selling or canceling orders for four others.

Five other financial companies that got a combined $120 billion in government cash injections — Citigroup Inc., Wells Fargo & Co., Bank of America Corp., JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Morgan Stanley — all own aircraft for executive travel, according to regulatory filings earlier this year and interviews.

A cross-country trip in a mid-sized jet costs about $20,000 for fuel. Maintenance, storage and pilot fees put the cost far higher.

Many U.S. companies are giving up the perk. The inventory of used private jets was up 52 percent as of September, according to recent JPMorgan data on the health of the private aircraft industry.

A few big U.S. companies have shunned jet ownership. Chip maker Intel Corp., for example, requires executives and employees to fly commercial. Intel occasionally charters jets for executives on overseas trips for security reasons, though.

For automakers, the public relations nightmare exploded last month when the chief executives of Ford, GM and Chrysler were criticized for flying on corporate jets to Washington to ask Congress for federal bailout money.

"Couldn't you all have downgraded to first class or jet-pooled, or something, to get here?" Rep. Gary Ackerman, D-N.Y., asked the CEOs.

When the executives went back to Capitol Hill two weeks later for a second round of hearings, they traveled by car.

So why were Wall Street executives spared from the corporate-jet backlash? One reason is that they didn't have to go before Congress to request bailout money, so no one asked how they traveled to Washington.

But an AP review of Securities and Exchange Commission filings and FAA records offers a glimpse of Wall Street firms' ownership and use of private aircraft. Among the findings:

• CITIGROUP: Has a wholly owned subsidiary, Citiflight Inc., that handles air travel for executives. Citi spokeswoman Shannon Bell refused to comment on the size of the firm's fleet but said it has been reduced by two-thirds over the past eight years. FAA records show four jets and a helicopter registered to the company.

In 2007, then-CEO Charles Prince used company aircraft for personal trips for security reasons. Those trips cost the company $170,972 for that year. Current CEO Vikram Pandit began reimbursing the company for all personal travel on company planes since being appointed in November 2007.

Use of Citigroup's aircraft currently is confined to a "limited number of executives," Bell said. "Executives are encouraged to fly commercial whenever possible to reduce expenses."

• MORGAN STANLEY: Has reduced its executive jet fleet size from three planes to two since 2005, company spokesman Mark Lake said. FAA records show two Gulfstream G-Vs as registered to the company.

In 2007, CEO John Mack's personal use of company aircraft totaled $355,882, according to a February proxy filing. Mack is required to use company aircraft for personal trips for security reasons.

• JPMORGAN: Registered as the owner of four Gulfstream jets, including a 2007 ultra-long range flagship G550 model, FAA records show. A G550 ordered for delivery that year would have cost roughly $47.5 million.

CEO Jamie Dimon is required to use company aircraft for personal trips; In 2007, his personal use of company jets totaled $211,182, according to a May filing with the SEC. Company spokesman Joe Evangelisti refused to comment on whether the bank has changed its policy on corporate aircraft use since accepting $25 billion in TARP money.

• BANK OF AMERICA: Registered as the owner of nine planes, including four Gulfstreams, FAA records show. Company spokesman Scott Silvestri refused to say whether the company has changed its policy on corporate aircraft use since taking $15 billion in bailout money.

CEO Kenneth Lewis, also required to use company aircraft for personal trips, racked up $127,643 in such travel last year, according to a March filing with the SEC.

• WELLS FARGO: Owns a single jet that "is strictly for business purposes under appropriate circumstances," spokeswoman Julia Tunis Bernard said. "No (government) funds will be used for corporate jet travel," she added.

SEC rules require publicly held companies to disclose executives' personal use of corporate aircraft. But there's "a lot of gray area" in how they do it, said David Yermack, a finance professor at the Stern School of Business at New York University who has studied the matter.

"If you use the plane for a personal trip but make one business call, should you report it?" he said. "Or if you're playing golf with potential business partners, does a company report that as business or personal?"

As mounting losses force companies to cut costs, some are becoming stingier about personal use of the company plane. Merrill Lynch & Co., for example, has banned such trips, according to company filings.

Experts say other companies that took bailout money will probably follow suit.

"The personal use of these planes is virtually indefensible at this point," said Patrick McGurn, special counsel at shareholder advisory firm RiskMetrics Group. "Once you're on the federal dole, the pressure is going to become immense on these firms to cut these costs."

Private jet manufacturers say the debate over executive travel has been overblown.

"What people don't understand is that business jets are mobile offices," said Robert N. Baugniet, Gulfstream's director of corporate communications. "If time has any value to you, then you'll understand why people use business jets."

He said the dustup hasn't hurt orders for new planes.

Still, some firms have avoided corporate jet ownership. Goldman Sachs Group, whose executives in past years have been among the highest-paid in the industry, has never owned its own aircraft since going public in 1999, spokesman Michael DuVally said.

The company does make private planes available to some executives through a fractional jet agreement, a timeshare-style arrangement, according to filings. Duvally refused to say how much the company spends on its fractional agreement.

Wary of being perceived as opulent, most companies fly in unmarked jets. Aviation buffs can usually track planes over the Internet using aircraft tail numbers. But many companies, including AIG and Citigroup, have blocked the public's ability to do so for security reasons.

Some corporate chieftains make no excuses for flying the private skies.

After years of railing against such costs, billionaire investor and Berkshire Hathaway Inc. CEO Warren Buffet broke down in 1989 and bought a Gulfstream IV-SP using $9.7 million in company funds. He named the aircraft "The Indefensible."
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on December 25, 2008, 08:00:17 PM
Market for Corporate Jets Goes Into Free-Fall (http://www.elitetrader.com/vb/showthread.php?threadid=149048)
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 01, 2009, 10:25:58 AM
TEB noise program begins to quiet critics
http://www.ainonline.com/news/single-news-page/article/teb-noise-program-begins-to-quiet-critics/

By Curt Epstein
January 1, 2009
Airports, Business Aviation

In honor of the second anniversary of the launch of the Teterboro Airport Working Group’s “Pledge to the Community” program–which has as its mission improving the airport’s relations with its neighbors– aviation industry representatives, New Jersey politicians and representatives of the airport’s governing agency, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, met to take stock of the program’s efficacy.

“Significant progress has been made since 2006 but there is still much more work to be done,” said Rep. Steve Rothman (D-N.J.), one of the brokers of the agreement. His district includes the airport and surrounding neighborhoods. “Teterboro Airport has been a noisy and somewhat bothersome neighbor for decades, but it is also a neighbor that employs 1,137 people, creates 15,554 other jobs and generates $1.8 billion in annual economic activity in the region.”

In 2006 the major points of the agreement included reducing Stage 2 aircraft operations and the number of nighttime flights at the airport. Since the program went into effect, Stage 2 aircraft operations have decreased 43 percent, while the number of night flights has been reduced by 16 percent. “The significant reduction in Stage 2 and overnight operations is a testament to the aviation industry’s commitment to this critical initiative,” said NATA president James Coyne.

At this year’s annual NBAA Convention, the airport handed out its “Good Neighbor Awards” for 2006 and 2007. According to airport manager Richard Heslin, the awards honored aircraft operators– who are either based at the airport or those who made more than 100 flights in and out of Teterboro during the year–who have not violated the night curfew in effect between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m., or operated Stage 2 aircraft into the airport.

While adherence to the TEB Working Group’s curfew and Stage 2 aircraft ban is called voluntary, abiding by the airport’s noise policy isn’t. Although the Airport Noise and Capacity Act passed by Congress in 1990 prohibits airports from establishing new noise or access rules–according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey–those such as Teterboro which had pre-existing restrictions were allowed to grandfather them in. The airport has restrictions on the acceptable noise levels for departures from the airport, which can vary according to the time of day, and Heslin has a serious enforcement system at his disposal to ensure that violators are quickly brought in line. “If an aircraft operator departing the airport exceeds the acceptable noise level, I send it a violation letter. If it receives three violations in a two-year period, that aircraft is banned from the airport forever,” he said.

Despite this system, some still see significant areas for improvement. “When the Working Group announced these pledges two years ago it had just over 50 percent of the operators at Teterboro voluntarily agreeing to abide by these pledges and it set a goal of having 90 percent signed up by the end of 2007. Unfortunately it has fallen well short of that goal since just over 60 percent of the operators have signed up so far,” said Rothman. Since its creation, more than 300 signatories have joined the program.

Rothman also expressed disappointment in the modest reduction in overnight flights seen at the airport. He commented, “We must work toward banning those flights completely and improving the quality of life of the residents
of the area.”
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 05, 2009, 06:10:02 PM
Public opinion of Teterboro teeters back and forth
From: http://leadernewspapers.net/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=9228&new_topic=18
By Bernadette Marciniak
Reporter

TETERBORO (Jan. 5, 2009, 4:45 p.m.) — Over the years, the residents who live along the elevated “ridge” in Carlstadt and Wood-Ridge have dealt with the consequences of Teterboro Airport and its constant comings and goings. Whether it’s the sound of a passing airplane drowning out a conversation or the flight path of an aircraft a little too low for comfort, these residents have a backyard view to a controversial neighborhood staple.

But for many, Teterboro Airport is a lifeline to gainful employment. These people are either employed by the airport themselves, or they are one of the many who bank on the local business the airport brings in every year.

The difference between the two extremes is sharp, and local officials are looking for middle ground to appease both sides.

U.S. Rep. Steve Rothman (NJ-9) is at the forefront of such efforts.

“As long as progress is being made, in terms of reducing the overall number of flights; reducing the nighttime flights; keeping the largest aircraft out; making safety improvements, security improvements and the like; it would be unwise to close the airport,” Rothman pointed out in a phone interview.

Teterboro employs roughly 1,200 workers and creates up to 16,000 more jobs in industries that depend on the airport, generating $1.8 billion, according to the Teterboro Economic Impact Study conducted in 2005.

“We want to work hard in these tough economic times to make sure we don’t damage this vital economic center,” Rothman continued.

A voluntary curfew was put on the airport in 2006, restricting pilots from taking off or landing between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m., except for extreme cases, such as ambulatory aviation. Congress has also pushed for the abandonment of Stage II aircraft — the older planes that make some of the loudest noise. In addition, Rothman has asked for efficiency to be considered, so that empty or near-empty planes wait until more cargo can be added before taking off.

With this progress, Teterboro is “still making money” while decreasing the number of flights that leave from the airport, said Rothman.

With these measures in place, the number of complaints around the airport has decreased, cited Bob Decheine, Rothman’s chief of staff.

As of right now, 60 percent of airplane operators using Teterboro have agreed to the voluntary restrictions recommended by Rothman and others. The goal is to have these operators use “peer pressure” to persuade the rest of the operators to sign on as well, said Decheine.

But some pilots conduct their business at night only, making the nighttime curfew impossible to follow.

Also, the 60 percent of pledging pilots was supposed to be 90 percent by 2007.

In addition, National Air Transportation Association Vice President Eric Byer said that even though running newer airplanes is cheaper in the long run, Stage III aircraft are almost three times more expensive than Stage II and not everyone can afford them.

If a compromise can’t be reached, restrictions could be made mandatory, said Decheine. Many of the pilots then could be compelled to take their business elsewhere, like nearby Morristown Municipal Airport.

However, this might not be the best choice either as Teterboro’s problems would simply just be passed on, according to an article in the Centennial Aviation & Business Journal. Morristown, along with many other airports, is also trying to phase out the louder airplanes and combat common airport problems.

Decheine stressed that pilots who move wouldn’t have the same proximity to New York City and other facilities such as medical labs that lie close to Teterboro.

According to the economic study, many of the 2,800 employees at Quest Diagnostics, a medical testing center, say that they wouldn’t be in the area if it weren’t for Teterboro.

Furthermore, Bergen County property values would decrease by almost $500 million because the gross economic activity the airport provides would substantially decrease, according to the economic impact study.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has been trying to work with Rothman and his supporters on this issue.

“The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has made a concerted effort in recent years to be a good neighbor to Teterboro Airport’s surrounding communities,” wrote Port Authority spokesperson Ron Marsico in an e-mail. “We have worked with Rep. Rothman and our aviation partners to reduce noise and the size of aircraft landing at the facility. … We appreciate his comments and look forward to improving on the progress we already have made to help ensure safety and improve the quality of life for nearby residents.”

In 2004, the Port Authority approved $45 million for a school soundproofing program, with the purpose of creating quieter classrooms in schools that are affected by the noise coming from Teterboro and other area airports.

“As a general rule, things have improved,” said Andrew Anderson, a resident of Wood-Ridge, who lives on Woodridge Street. “It’s still noisy. … (But) things have changed.”

Rothman said he still wants to see more effort being made so that the value of Teterboro can stay intact while local residents can rest quietly.

“Progress needs to be made every single day,” Rothman said.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Homer Jones on January 16, 2009, 12:54:21 PM
By now everyone has heard about yesterdays crash of an airliner into the Hudson River and the heroic efforts of the pilot to save the passenger's and crewmember's lives. If you read the articles in all the papers today, you can see that an air traffic controller "suggested" that the pilot attempt a landing at Teterboro Airport. The suggestion was made while the aircraft was somewhere over the Bronx.
As we know, the Bronx is north of Hackensack and Teterboro Airport is south of Hackensack. Fortunately the pilot disregarded the suggestion and ditched the aircraft in the Hudson River.
If the pilot had chosen the Teterboro Airport option, the flight path may well have taken the plane right over Prospect Avenue.
You can figure out the rest of the this scenario.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: BLeafe on January 16, 2009, 02:27:12 PM
If the pilot had chosen the Teterboro Airport option, the flight path may well have taken the plane right over Prospect Avenue.
You can figure out the rest of the this scenario.

Plus, even if it DID make it to Teterboro, would the runways have been long enough for an Airbus A320?

I think either scenario would have been a disaster.



.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Homer Jones on January 16, 2009, 03:30:54 PM
Here is something really interesting, if not prophetic.
Microsoft has a program  known as FLIGHT SIMULATOR X which allows a player to select a type of aircraft, an airport, time of day and weather conditions from a list. I have the program and one of the aircraft that you can select is an Airbus 321 which is almost identical to the plane that went down yesterday. You can select an airport including Laguardia. Coincidentally the default runway is runway 4 which is the same runway that the US AIR flight used. The default time for the afternoon is 2:37 PM which is almost an hour before the US AIR flight departed.
What this all means is that a player can simulate almost the exact route in almost the same plane and experience what the pilot experienced within the same time frame.
The scenery component is true to life including the location and runway configuration at Teterboro Airport as well as the Hudson River location where he set the plane down.
Of course I have tried to duplicate the flight on the simulator with the expected results for one who has never flown a commercial aircraft.
The one thing that becomes apparant is that this pilot only had a few seconds to make his decision whether to try Teterboro or ditch the plane in the River. Luckily for Hackensack, he made the right decision.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 16, 2009, 04:07:55 PM
Does your simulated plane float 60 blocks once you "land" in the Hudson?

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Homer Jones on January 16, 2009, 04:53:34 PM
No need to my good man. A couple of keystrokes and I am back on Runway 4 heading back into the wild blue yonder or in my case, the the deep blue sea.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: irons35 on January 16, 2009, 09:33:30 PM
There is at least one runway at Teterboro that can handle a landing of a lightly loaded 747.  an A320 would be no problem.  the 747 would only be able to take off empty though.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: just watching on January 16, 2009, 11:36:35 PM
I think Teaneck and Bogota would have been at risk had the aircraft attempted to reach Teterboro, not necessarily Prospect Avenue

Teterboro also has a runway that comes in from the Northeast, generally over Bogota and then the First Ward of Hackensack.  That may have been first choice in an emergency situation arising over the Bronx.

Somehow I envision that plane crash landing in the Overpeck Creek or perhaps the Hackensack River near the Bergen County Jail, if he could make it that far. Would have been an icier landing, I bet.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on February 04, 2009, 11:07:33 AM
6 connected to Teterboro crash indicted
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--teterborocrash0204feb04,0,1877719.story

February 4, 2009
NEWARK, N.J. - Six people connected to a charter jet company that operated a flight that crashed at Teterboro Airport in 2005 have been indicted for conspiring to violate regulatory practices.

The flight failed to take off, smashed through a fence, crossed heavily traveled Route 46 and slammed into a warehouse. No one was killed, but 20 people were injured.

Investigators said the flight crew did not properly calculate the plane's center of gravity due to over-fueling.

In the indictment unsealed Wednesday, five officials and a pilot who worked for the now-defunct Platinum Jet Management of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., were charged with conspiracy to purposely violate regulatory requirements for operating commercial aircraft.

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 26, 2009, 05:52:17 PM
Double Trouble For Private Jets
By Richard Newman / The Record (Hackensack, N.J.)
Thursday, March 26, 2009
HACKENSACK, N.J. - It’s not only the down economy that’s hurting the private jet business.

Public outcries against government-bailout-seeking executives flying around in luxurious corporate jets also have contributed to steep declines in orders for new jets and cancellations of existing orders for jet makers.

The stigma on private jet travel is putting well-paying aviation jobs at risk, said John Rosanvallon, chief executive officer of Dassault Falcon at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey. Dassault Falcon’s French parent, Dassault Aviation SA, said last week that orders for new jets fell to 115 last year from 212 in 2007, and that some customers have canceled orders in recent months.

Other aircraft makers also are hurting. Wichita, Kan.-based Cessna Aircraft Co. plans to lay off 4,600, or 30 percent of its workforce, amid declining orders. Hawker Beechcraft Corp., also in Wichita, cut 2,300 jobs in February.

Rosanvallon has joined other private-aviation industry leaders in arguing that the criticisms are unfair and are exacerbating an already difficult situation, with corporations tightening their travel budgets. "When you look at use of business aviation, it’s not just a few fat cats traveling around," he said in a recent interview. "It’s used by a lot of middle-management people."

French-owned Dassault Falcon employs nearly 500 people at Teterboro with a payroll of about $50 million a year, Rosanvallon said.

Flights at Teterboro, one of the busiest private jetports in the country, are down more than 30 percent this year, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the airport’s operator.

Widespread criticism of private jet travel came to the fore last year when the leaders of struggling U.S. automakers flew in corporate jets to Washington to tell lawmakers why they need taxpayer assistance.

The Obama administration in January pressured Citigroup Inc., which has received tens of billions of dollars in government assistance, to cancel an order for a $50 million Falcon 7X. The 7X, which has been flying since mid-2007, has been a hot seller for Dassault Falcon. It seats 12 and can reach Honolulu from New York without refueling.

Rosanvallon declined to comment on specific deals. Citigroup’s cancellation was "just one example," he said. "The automotive thing got more publicity," he said.

Dassault Falcon jet orders from Citigroup, Royal Bank of Scotland Plc and American International Group Inc. "are now worthless," said Charles Edelstenne, CEO of Dassault Falcon’s parent company, according to the Wall Street Journal.

However, companies that cancel orders often lose deposits in the millions of dollars.

Rosanvallon said Friday that some job cuts may be coming soon to Teterboro because of the industry’s deepening woes. The cuts "will be modest compared to Wichita," he said, referring to the layoffs at Cessna and Hawker.

He will have more information about job reductions in about a month, he said.

Corporations are in no hurry to buy new jets. JPMorgan Chase & Co. said this week that it has no plans to purchase new jets or renovate an aircraft hangar until after it has paid off the money it received as part of the government’s bank investment program last fall. Chase received $25 billion from the government’s Troubled Asset Relief Program.

Blue Star Jets, LLC is an air charter broker who is an agent of its customers. Blue Star Jets, LLC is not an air carrier and does not own or operate the aircraft on which its clients fly. All Flights are operated by Part 135 Carriers. Operators providing service for Blue Star Jets' clients must meet standards set forth by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 28, 2009, 07:49:42 PM
Teterboro runway slated for $27M makeover
Thursday, May 28, 2009
BY TOM DAVIS
NorthJersey.com

A heavily-used, aging runway at Teterboro will get a $27 million overhaul over the next year, Port Authority officials said Thursday.

The bi-state agency’s Board of Commissioners approved the project that will receive about $5 million in federal stimulus funding.

The repair is part of the agency’s runway maintenance that occurs every seven to 10 years and leads to minimal or no disruption in aircraft operations, said Chris Ward, the Port Authority’s executive director.

“It’s the Port Authority’s commitment to maintaining all of our assets on a first class basis,” Ward said.

The runway’s foundation, which hasn’t been renovated in 14 years, will be repaved and rebuilt beginning in June, said Bill DeCota, aviation director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

The agency hired Tilcon of New York to perform the work, which will also include improving the runway’s drainage, lighting and communication systems.

The Port Authority plans to close the runway only on weekends, shifting traffic to other airports.

Traffic at the Teterboro, which is one of the busiest airports in the country and handles private aviation, drops by 50 percent on weekends.

“It’s noteworthy,” DeCota said. “It’s a big project. It’s sophisticated.”

The 6,015-foot asphalt surface, known as Runway 6-24, is one of two runways at Teterboro Airport and runs from the southwest to the northeast.

The U.S. Department of Transportation announced last month that Teterboro and Somerset airports will receive $5.6 million in federal stimulus funds for airport improvement projects.

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said he had established a team to ensure that economic recovery funding is made available for transportation infrastructure projects.

The Teterboro project is part of the Port Authority's $3.3 billion capital budget for 2009. The agency on Tuesday also approved paying $3.3 million to restructure ramps that connect to the main span of the George Washington Bridge.

 

E-mail: davist@northjersey.com

 

A heavily-used, aging runway at Teterboro will get a $27 million overhaul over the next year, Port Authority officials said Thursday.

The bi-state agency’s Board of Commissioners approved the project that will receive about $5 million in federal stimulus funding.

The repair is part of the agency’s runway maintenance that occurs every seven to 10 years and leads to minimal or no disruption in aircraft operations, said Chris Ward, the Port Authority’s executive director.

“It’s the Port Authority’s commitment to maintaining all of our assets on a first class basis,” Ward said.

The runway’s foundation, which hasn’t been renovated in 14 years, will be repaved and rebuilt beginning in June, said Bill DeCota, aviation director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

The agency hired Tilcon of New York to perform the work, which will also include improving the runway’s drainage, lighting and communication systems.

The Port Authority plans to close the runway only on weekends, shifting traffic to other airports.

Traffic at the Teterboro, which is one of the busiest airports in the country and handles private aviation, drops by 50 percent on weekends.

“It’s noteworthy,” DeCota said. “It’s a big project. It’s sophisticated.”

The 6,015-foot asphalt surface, known as Runway 6-24, is one of two runways at Teterboro Airport and runs from the southwest to the northeast.

The U.S. Department of Transportation announced last month that Teterboro and Somerset airports will receive $5.6 million in federal stimulus funds for airport improvement projects.

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said he had established a team to ensure that economic recovery funding is made available for transportation infrastructure projects.

The Teterboro project is part of the Port Authority's $3.3 billion capital budget for 2009. The agency on Tuesday also approved paying $3.3 million to restructure ramps that connect to the main span of the George Washington Bridge.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 15, 2009, 10:42:56 PM
When I read the article below, it reminded me of an earlier post (http://www.hackensacknow.org/index.php?topic=204.msg1764#msg1764) where a Teterboro air traffic controller complained about the lack of controllers in the tower.  

Controller bantering about dead cat before crash (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090815/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/us_mid_air_collision)

WASHINGTON – The air traffic controller handling the small plane involved in a deadly crash with a helicopter over the Hudson River was chatting on the telephone about a dead cat at the airport and initially failed to warn the pilot of other aircraft in his path, officials say.

The controller tried unsuccessfully to contact the pilot before the accident, officials said Friday, but the plane collided with a tour helicopter over the Hudson River, killing nine people.

The controller handling the plane and his supervisor at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey at the time of the accident a week ago have been placed on administrative leave pending an investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

The National Transportation Safety Board said in a report that the controller, who has not been identified, cleared the single-engine Piper for takeoff at 11:48 and 30 seconds a.m. EDT, then made a telephone call. He remained on the phone, including while further instructing the plane's pilot, until the accident happened.

The phone call, to an airport contractor, was a "silly conversation" concerning a dead cat that had been removed from the airport, a retired union official said, in an account supported by transportation officials also familiar with the contents of the call.

After takeoff, the plane flew southbound until the controller directed it to turn left toward the river, the report said. At 11:52 and 20 seconds, the controller instructed the plane to contact air traffic control at nearby Newark Liberty International Airport, which is part of the procedure for handing off oversight of the small plane.

The pilot apparently did not contact Newark, the report said.

Radar data show there were several aircraft immediately ahead of the plane, including the tour helicopter, "all of which were potential traffic conflicts for the airplane," but the Teterboro controller didn't warn the pilot, the report said.

It wasn't until controllers at the Newark airport alerted the Teterboro controller to the potential collision that he twice tried unsuccessfully to contact the pilot, the report said. The collision occurred at 11:53 and 14 seconds.

At the time the Newark controllers were alerting the Teterboro controller to the danger, they also recommended the plane turn southwest. The plane's pilot apparently overhead that and acknowledged the instruction, the report said.

Video of the crash taken by a tourist sightseeing near the Statute of Liberty show the Piper changing direction seconds before its wing was clipped by the helicopter's rotors. The plane then broke apart in the air and both aircraft plunged into the Hudson.

Union officials representing air traffic controllers said the Teterboro controller couldn't have warned the Piper pilot of the helicopter in its path at the time the plane was directed toward the river. They said the helicopter was just taking off and hadn't appeared on the radar screen yet.

"He was out of communication with the guy by the time the helicopter ever popped up on anybody's radar scope," said Phil Barbarello, National Air Traffic Controllers Association eastern region vice president.

The FAA has said there is no reason to believe the controller's actions contributed to the accident. However, the agency said the phone conversation was inappropriate and such conduct is unacceptable. The safety board, in a pointed statement, said it was too early to reach any conclusions about controllers in the crash.

The supervisor's conduct also is being investigated because he was out of the building at the time. Controllers, including supervisors, are expected to be available throughout their work shift in case they are needed, even if they are taking a break.

The NTSB report said two other Teterboro controllers were taking a break at the time of the accident. The only controllers on duty were the controller who was talking on the phone and another controller who was handling arriving planes and ground traffic.


The phone call, made on a landline that controllers use to contact other parts of the airport, was to an employee of Baltimore-based AvPORTS, a contractor for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which manages the airport, according to port authority officials.

"He was talking to the Port Authority about a dead cat on the taxiway ... it turned into a silly conversation," said Barrett Byrnes, a recently retired air traffic controller and former National Air Traffic Controllers Association representative who stays in touch with New York and New Jersey controllers. "There was a little banter."

Three officials close to the investigation verified that the banter was about a cat carcass on the airport grounds.

A federal task force began work Friday on improving safety procedures for pilots flying in the busy airspace around New York City and was given 10 days to report, the FAA said.

________________________
April 3, 2006 post:

This showed up on AVWeb (http://www.avweb.com/news/avmail/191897-1.html)

ATC Staffing

I am a controller at TEB airport [Teterboro, N.J.]. There are many times where there are only two controllers in the Tower because we are short staffed, and management does not want to call in overtime to make up staffing. We are supposed to have five positions open but only have two on certain days. They usually combine Local, Ground control, and CIC [controller in charge]. The local controller should be focusing on the runways and the aircrafts in the air. With the positions combined the Local controller now has to worry about the aircraft on taxiways has well. Sometime you have controllers staying in the Tower the whole day without a break.

This is a safety issue to all the flying public. This can also cause delays and have aircraft burning fuel on the ground when they should be flying. Safety is what we should focus on, not on how much management can cut back and get away with it. The FAA is going to continue this way until the flying public has had enough or something happens.

Name withheld by request
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 17, 2009, 11:29:34 PM
NTSB changes key point in Hudson collision report (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_mid_air_collision)

The board now says in a statement released Monday that while the controller at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey failed to warn of several aircraft in the path of the single-engine Piper, the tour helicopter wasn't one of the aircraft on the controller's radar screen until seven seconds after the handoff to nearby Newark Liberty International Airport.


The Teterboro controller made a personal phone call shortly after clearing the Piper for takeoff at 11:48 a.m. EDT and remained on the phone until the collision five minutes later, even while he was directing traffic, according to the board and the Federal Aviation Administration.


"Even if the investigation reveals their (controllers') actions did not contribute to the accident, it represents a serious violation of FAA procedures," said Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va.


Regardless of who is to blame for this latest crash, it's frightening to learn just how incompetent people charged with our safety can be. That goes for management too.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 21, 2009, 12:45:48 AM
Teterboro incident investigations top area airports
Thursday, August 20, 2009
Last updated: Thursday August 20, 2009, 9:34 PM
BY TOM DAVIS
The Record

Federal investigators have probed more than twice the number of incidents that raised safety concerns at Teterboro than they have at New York City’s two major airports since 2004, according to National Transportation Safety Board records.

Those airports — John F. Kennedy International and LaGuardia — have more than twice the amount of traffic and, unlike Teterboro, cater to larger commercial aircraft.

One Teterboro incident that prompted an NTSB probe involved the Aug. 8 fatal mid-air collision over the Hudson River. The NTSB has said a Teterboro controller failed to warn a pilot of “potential traffic conflicts” before his plane crashed, killing nine.

The NTSB investigates incidents that severely impact the safety of flight crews, airport employees and passengers, said Keith Holloway, a board spokesman. Those incidents involve “fatalities, substantial damage to an aircraft” or close calls between airplanes and people and equipment on the ground.

“An aircraft tire blowing out may not rise to that level,” Holloway said.

The investigations underscore the concerns aviation advocates, controllers and experts have raised about Teterboro, which caters to smaller general aviation but, nevertheless, is one of the busiest airports in the nation.

“It’s just so congested,” said Matthew Ziemkiewicz, president of the National Air Disaster Alliance, a group that represents pilots and travelers. “I’m not convinced they [Teterboro’s staff] have the latest and greatest technology to do the job effectively.”

Newark Liberty International Airport also lags behind Teterboro in terms of incidents that have sparked a federal probe over the past five years — despite having nearly three times the amount of air traffic, according to NTSB records.

The NTSB has completed investigations into 13 incidents that raised safety concerns at Teterboro since Jan. 1, 2004, compared to 10 at Newark, 5 at JFK and 4 at LaGuardia.

Nearly all of the incidents involved either controller error or pilot mistakes, according to the NTSB’s conclusions identified in the “probable cause” component of its investigation reports.

Jim Peters, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman, declined to comment other than saying: “The NTSB did its investigations and issued its probable cause [reports] for those accidents.”

Doug Church, a spokesman for the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, said the focus on Teterboro’s safety concerns is “unfortunate” because his organization believes the airport’s controller staff had nothing to do with the Aug. 8 crash.

At Teterboro, however, controllers have complained they work in cramped conditions that barely give them space to maneuver. They also struggle to live in one of the country's most expensive regions since their salaries are at the low end of the FAA pay scale.

“It’s a major airport that has its own unique challenges,” Church said last week.

Close calls have been a problem at Teterboro, and two incidents — labeled “incursions” by the FAA — inspired the NTSB last year to launch investigations into how wayward jets got within hundreds of feet of people and aircraft.

On June 25, 2008, a Learjet landed on a closed runway. A controller working solo at 5:34 a.m. had allowed the aircraft — which came within 150 feet of two ground workers — to land on the closed runway, according to the FAA.

On July 9, 2008, at 10:10 a.m., a controller was slow to stop a Cessna from approaching an intersecting runway, according to the NTSB. The airplane came with 1,200 feet of a Dassault Falcon that was preparing to take off.

The probe determined that controller failure played a role in the incidents.

Veteran New Jersey flight instructor and pilot Joseph Blakaitis, who has flown to Teterboro “many times,” said the airport involves “a lot of attention to detail” because of its close proximity to three major airports that have heavy commercial air traffic.

“It’s a confined airspace — you have to be where you’re supposed to be and do what you’re supposed to do,” he said. “If a pilot doesn’t like the airport, the best thing is to stay the hell out of it.”

But George Weng, a Rutgers University professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, said the airport could improve its safety by having airplanes land with less frequency. He said the FAA allows too many to land too close together — particularly at Newark.

“You don’t want takeoffs and landings every 30 seconds — that’s no good,” he said.

Ziemkiewicz, who lost his sister in the TWA Flight 800 crash off Long Island in 1996, called on the FAA to expedite the introduction of satellite technology that could follow planes and help pilots follow routes using technology that’s comparable to a car GPS system.

“I don’t know many people without a GPS to help them get where they want to go,” he said.

E-mail: davist@northjersey.com
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Prospect Avenue Coalition on August 21, 2009, 07:51:21 AM
Plane crashes while trying to land at Teterboro; 2 injured
Friday, August 21, 2009
Last updated: Friday August 21, 2009, 7:30 AM
BY TOM DAVIS AND JENNIFER CUNNINGHAM STAFF WRITERS
The Record


Two people were seriously injured when their small plane overshot the runway at Teterboro Airport, hit a tree and came barreling down onto the lawn of a business on Route 46 early this morning.

Both the pilot and co-pilot suffered severe burns; one was airlifted to St. Barnabas Medical Center and the other to Hackensack University Medical Center, police said.

The Federal Aviation Administration, the state Department of Transportation, state and county police and local firefighters are on the scene. Police are waiting for the National Transportation Safety Board to arrive at the airport and take control of the investigation.

Little Ferry police say the twin-engine Beechcraft crashed while trying to land. Police believe the flight had originated in Reading, Pa., and was carrying blood specimens for Qwest Diagnostics. The pilot and co-pilot were the only ones aboard, and everyone on the ground appears to be safe.

The injured were able to crawl out of the wreckage after the plane fell short of landing on runway 19.

The accident comes two weeks after an air collision over the Hudson River killed nine people. Federal investigators said a Teterboro controller failed to notice “potential traffic conflicts” before the crash.

Federal investigators have probed more than twice the number of incidents that raised safety concerns at Teterboro than they have at New York City’s two major airports since 2004, according to National Transportation Safety Board records.

Police have cordoned off the portion of Route 46 where the plane disintegrated and erupted in flames. The mangled remains of the plane are scattered along the road and on the lawn of Flomo Corp, 698 Route 46.

The investigations underscore the concerns aviation advocates, controllers and experts have raised about Teterboro, a small general aviation airport that is one of the busiest in the country, and is in close proximity to three major airports.

Those airports — John F. Kennedy International, Newark Liberty and LaGuardia — have more than twice the amount of traffic and, unlike Teterboro, cater to larger commercial aircraft.

Route 46 is open, and the airport has resumed operations.

 LIVE VIDEO FROM MYFOXNY.COM
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Prospect Avenue Coalition on August 22, 2009, 08:13:11 AM
1010WINS

Posted: Friday, 21 August 2009 6:27PM

Small Plane Crashes Near Teterboro Airport, 2 Injured

http://www.1010wins.com/PICS--2-Walk-Away-from-Fiery-Plane-Crash-at-Teterb/5053579 (http://www.1010wins.com/PICS--2-Walk-Away-from-Fiery-Plane-Crash-at-Teterb/5053579)

Excerpt from article:

TETERBORO, N.J. (AP/1010 WINS)  -- A report released by the Government Accountability Office last year found that Teterboro had 23 runway incursions -- incidents in which aircraft strayed into areas designated for takeoffs and landings -- from fiscal 2001 through 2007, two fewer than nearby Newark Liberty International Airport, which handles about three times as many flights annually. Three of the Teterboro incursions were classified as serious, meaning there was a risk of planes colliding, more than occurred at major airports in Philadelphia, Boston and Miami over the same period.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 25, 2009, 08:27:07 AM
New alarms sounded on safety
Friday, August 21, 2009
Last updated: Saturday August 22, 2009, 9:21 AM
BY MATTHEW VAN DUSEN AND ASHLEY KINDERGAN
The Record
Staff Writers

Local officials called for stronger oversight of Teterboro Airport on Friday, saying there should be fewer airplanes flying in and out of the densely populated area or greater control of the airspace.

Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-Paterson, said the crash of the twin-engine propeller plane on Friday, which comes two weeks after a deadly collision over the Hudson River involving a plane from Teterboro, demands a response by regulators and lawmakers.

“Now is the time to act,” said Pascrell, who said he would reach out to his former colleagues on the House Transportation Committee about an investigation. “Actually, the time to act was yesterday.”

Pascrell’s concern was matched by people who live and work near the airport, which is among the three busiest general aviation airports in the nation.

“Sometimes we’re outside half an hour for lunch and we count about 12 planes,” said Fran Izzo, who works at E. Wortmann Machine Works, Inc., next to where the plane crashed on Friday.

Machinist Andy Dymek added, “I always said someday it’s going to happen here. We always think about it, but there’s nothing we can do.”

But pilot groups and local officials said the numbers show that the airport, contrary to recent reports, is safe.

Chris Dancy, a spokesman for the non-profit Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, said that there were 19 accidents from 1989 to 2008 involving planes either approaching the airport, on the ground, or immediately after departing, according to National Transportation Safety Board data.

Those accidents caused six deaths and five serious injuries to people on the airplanes and two serious injuries to people on the ground, he said. The numbers do not include Friday’s crash, which seriously injured a pilot and co-pilot or the Aug. 8 crash over the Hudson River that killed nine people — three people in a plane that departed from Teterboro and six in a sightseeing helicopter from New York.

“One accident per year out of 100,000 flights per year is not bad,” Dancy said, citing Teterboro’s 2007 air traffic numbers from the Federal Aviation Administration.

He added that Teterboro sees pilots with different levels of experience and a wide variety of aircraft so it is harder to achieve the same safety numbers as major airports.

Dancy said that the airport is not just a hub for CEOs flying on private jets – it’s an important tool for easing congestion at the three major New York City airports and provides a way for businesses to extend their reach.

Teterboro Borough Administrator Paul Bush, who believes the airport is run well, said that the proximity to New York means that every minor accident and incursion receives scrutiny.

“We have other accidents around us everyday,” Bush said. “When an airplane has a problem it makes news and they have some kind of investigation.”

Even critics such as Pascrell conceded that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the airport, have improved it in recent years.

The Port Authority has banned noisy jets and aircraft that weigh more than 100,000 pounds and imposed a curfew between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. for all aircraft except air ambulances, according to officials.

“We’re very mindful of our role in trying to make this place as safe as possible,” said Susan Baer, the deputy director of the Port Authority’s aviation department.

The airport also employs more than 1,100 people, creates many more jobs in the region and generates about $1.8 billion of economic activity, according to figures cited in 2008 by Rep. Steve Rothman, D-Fair Lawn, who represents the area that includes the airport.

Rothman, a longtime critic of pollution, noise and air traffic at the airport was waiting for more information on Friday’s crash before commenting, a spokeswoman said.

Pascrell said he would reach out to the House Transportation Committee chairman, Rep. James Oberstar, D-Minnesota, whom he called an expert on air traffic. He did not lay out specific plans for regulation of the airport.

Bergen County Executive Dennis McNerney said he would also ask county officials to review Teterboro’s operations and talk to the Port Authority about how it is using Stewart International Airport in New York to reduce traffic.

The county has not taken a stance on what — if anything — should change at Teterboro.

But McNerney said he was concerned about the close proximity of the crash site to the county’s technical high school. He also cited the 2005 crash of a jet that skidded across Route 46 after a failed takeoff.

"This is really getting too close for comfort, the number of accidents that are going on down there," McNerney said.

Staff writers Nick Clunn and Mike Kelly contributed to this article. E-mail: vandusen@northjersey.com and Kindergan@northjersey.com
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 19, 2009, 08:49:14 PM
Menendez calls for upgrades at Teterboro
Friday, September 18, 2009
BY TOM DAVIS
The Record
STATE HOUSE BUREAU

U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez wants the Obama administration to pay for a new traffic tower at Teterboro Airport that would give controllers improved visibility and provide them with more modern equipment.

In a letter to President Obama on Wednesday, Menendez asked that money be included in the administration’s fiscal year 2011 budget request, citing two recent crashes involving Teterboro as inspiration for upgrading the small but busy airport.

Menendez did not offer specifics, but air traffic controllers say the Federal Aviation Administration should build a tower anywhere from 10 feet to 50 feet higher so they see over trees surrounding the airport.

The existing 34-year-old structure is about 100 feet tall, though controllers say the height of the tower was not a factor in an Aug. 8 air collision over the Hudson River that killed nine people.

"Investing in a new tower now will be a down payment on meaningful safety improvements for decades to come," Menendez wrote in the letter.

Two weeks after the Aug. 8 crash, another small plane crashed outside the airport’s gates. No one was injured in that incident.

A Senate Commerce Committee subcommittee on aviation held hearings on the crashes this week, and federal officials testified that the busy airport lacks updated equipment that could better track departing planes.

Members of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association were pleased with Menendez’s recommendation, pointing out that Teterboro is one of the three busiest airports in the nation that cater to general aviation.

Dave Gioffe, the union’s Teterboro representative, said controllers struggle to see planes arriving at the airport, and equipment used to measure wind occasionally offers "the wrong reading."

The wind-measurement equipment also is old and not digitalized, he said, making it susceptible to breakdowns and mistakes.

"Sometimes we have to land people with severe cross winds," he said.

In his letter, Menendez said congestion continues to be an issue in the New Jersey and New York City airspace — despite the recession. Local airports routinely have among the most airplane delays of any facilities in the nation.

Menendez expects the aviation system to continue growing in a region that has 12 airports within 50 miles of Manhattan.

"The recent tragic events in the airspace surrounding Teterboro highlight the need to upgrade the facility, equip it with state-of-the-art technology and, in turn, deliver important safety improvements," he wrote.

E-mail: davist@northjersey.com
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on November 19, 2010, 11:31:04 PM
Not sure how I missed this...

Plane overshoots Teterboro runway, is stopped by arrestor bed (http://www.northjersey.com/news/bergen/100110_Plane_overshoots_Teterboro_runway_is_stopped_by_arrestor_bed.html)
Friday, October 1, 2010
Last updated: Friday October 1, 2010, 8:47 PM
BY NICK CLUNN
The Record
STAFF WRITER

TETERBORO — A special cement meant to prevent planes from overshooting runways stopped one Friday less than 300 feet from Route 46 — saving the lives of nine people on board and countless others on the ground.

No one was injured when the Gulfstream G-IV reached the end of the 6,000-foot runway at Teterboro Airport and plowed into an arrestor bed, bringing it to a halt, said Jennifer Friedberg, a spokeswoman for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates the airport.

The blocks of aerated cement that form the bed are meant to have the same effect as gradually deepening snow would to a moving car. The jet did not show any obvious signs of damage, although its tires and landing gear were buried in the blocks.

Two men who were attempting to jump-start a car in a parking lot across from the airport when the plane landed said it briefly looked as if it was attempting to take off before coming to rest.

“Look, look, look!” one said to the other, neither wanting to give their names.

It was at least the second time that an arrestor bed has stopped a plane at Teterboro since they were installed one year after a jet ran off a runway in 2005, hitting cars and a warehouse on Route 46.

Kyle May, who attends Bergen County Technical High School across Route 46, said the plane Friday “would have at least gotten to the highway” if not for the bed. He recalled being at the high school with his older brother days after the 2005 crash, watching workers tend to the wreckage.

“Seeing where it stopped definitely makes me feel safer,” he said.

The jet, which carried two pilots and seven passengers, landed about 1:45 p.m. after taking off from Toronto, Friedberg said. It was not clear who was on board, or who sat behind the controls.

An employee of Meridian, the fixed-base operator that handled the flight at the general aviation airport, said no one from the company wanted to comment.

Public records identified the jet’s owner as Wilmington Trust, a bank in Delaware. But bank spokesman Bill Benintende said Wilmington Trust only held title to the plane. Someone else, whose identity the bank would not disclose, operated and maintained the aircraft.

A spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said the agency is investigating the accident.

E-mail: clunn@northjersey.com
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: BLeafe on November 20, 2010, 01:03:51 AM
Not sure how I missed this...

Plane overshoots Teterboro runway, is stopped by arrestor bed (http://www.northjersey.com/news/bergen/100110_Plane_overshoots_Teterboro_runway_is_stopped_by_arrestor_bed.html)
Friday, October 1, 2010
...It was at least the second time that an arrestor bed has stopped a plane at Teterboro since they were installed one year after a jet ran off a runway in 2005, hitting cars and a warehouse on Route 46.


Well, here's next month's find:

Jet company president guilty on most serious charge in Teterboro crash case

Monday, November 15, 2010

BY PETER J. SAMPSON
The Record
STAFF WRITER

The former president of a luxury charter company whose plane barreled off a Teterboro Airport runway in 2005 put profits ahead of safety in a scheme to overload jets with cheap fuel, a jury ruled Monday.

The jury of seven men and five women returned split verdicts in Newark against the Guyana-born brothers Michael and Paul Brassington, executives and co-founders of the now-defunct Platinum Jet Management LLC of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Michael Brassington, the company’s former president, chief operating officer and chief pilot, was portrayed by prosecutors as the architect of a brazen scheme to defraud passengers, charter brokers, the Federal Aviation Administration and others by misrepresenting his company’s compliance with safety regulations.

He was found guilty on the most serious charge of endangering the safety of an aircraft in flight. The jury found him guilty on eight additional charges and cleared him on 12 counts of making false statements.

His younger brother, a former vice president largely responsible for marketing, was found guilty only of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and was acquitted on four other counts.

The charge of endangering the safety of an aircraft in flight, which normally is used in terrorism cases, related to Michael Brassington’s concealment of dangerous over-fueling and weight distribution practices that caused the jet’s center of gravity to exceed its forward weight limit for takeoff, contributing to the Feb. 2, 2005, Teterboro crash, authorities said.

Prosecutors charged he misled the flight officer responsible for fueling and preparing the weight and balance graphs by informing him that the plane was 1,000 pounds lighter than it actually was. As a result, the twinjet’s nose failed to lift off at the expected speed, causing the pilot to abort the takeoff as he quickly ran out of runway.

Traveling at speeds approaching 200 miles per hour, the Bombardier Challenger 600 jet plowed through a steel perimeter fence and struck two cars as it crossed six lanes of Route 46 before crashing into a clothing warehouse and bursting into flames. Both pilots and two passengers were seriously injured.

“A pattern of fraud and deception is not a business plan,” U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman said in a statement. “Today’s verdict confirms that there are consequences when you break the law to boost your bottom line.”

Lawyers for the two defendants declined comment after the verdict, which came on the fourth day of deliberations in a month-long trial.

In February 2009, four years after the crash, the Brassingtons were arrested at their homes in Fort Lauderdale along with three other Platinum Jet executives and a pilot. Another pilot, who was in control of the plane when it crashed, was later indicted and is awaiting trial in Florida.

During the Brassingtons’ trial, Assistant U.S. Attorneys Scott McBride and J. Fortier Imbert accused the brothers of operating a “rogue” charter service that regularly put their rich and famous passengers at risk in order to save money by dangerously over-fueling planes at airports where fuel was cheap. The brothers also were accused of using planes and personnel that were not certified for commercial flights, and falsifying flight logs to conceal violations.

Defense lawyers Michael Salnick and Bruce Reinhart acknowledged some paperwork errors and mislabeling of flights, but argued that their clients never intentionally broke the law.

With a client list that included celebrities like rapper Jay-Z, singer-actress Beyoncé, rocker Jon Bon Jovi, basketball star Shaquille O’Neal and football legend Joe Montana, the Brassingtons had no incentive to save pennies on discount fuel, their attorneys said. The defense also presented testimony that a mechanical problem led to the crash.

Platinum Jet was founded in August 2000 and flew more than 100 charter flights and collected more than $3 million in revenue over the next 15 months without the required certificate for commercial operations, prosecutors said. It later shared another company’s certificate but continued to skirt FAA safety rules and falsify required paperwork, the indictment alleged.

The judge dismissed the charges against one co-defendant, Brian McKenzie, Platinum’s former director of maintenance, after the government rested, while the charges against John Kimberling, who piloted the ill-fated Teterboro flight, were transferred to Florida for trial because of his health. The other defendants, co-founder and managing member Andre Budhan; director of charters Joseph Singh; and pilot Francis Viera; pleaded guilty to fraud charges before the trial. Budhan and Singh testified for the government.

U.S. District Judge Dennis M. Cavanaugh continued the brothers’ bail and set sentencing for March 17. Paul Brassington faces up to five years in prison while his brother faces a maximum of 20 years on the aircraft-endangerment charge alone.


E-mail: sampson@northjersey.com



.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 20, 2011, 08:39:56 AM
I've been saying this for years....
______________________________________

Kelly: It’s time to ban jets at Teterboro

Monday, June 20, 2011
By MIKE KELLY
RECORD COLUMNIST

Maybe it's just a sign of the times.

Maybe it's the sound and lack of fury at our times.

The muscular jets at tiny Teterboro Airport have become so noisy that our federal government is setting aside money in its already debt-ridden budget to soundproof a nearby school.

The price tag for this fancy earplug for Henry P. Becton Regional High School in East Rutherford is $18 million.

This is supposed to be a good thing.

Really?

When Becton Regional was built in 1971, the designers and school officials knew they were placing a high school within a mile of an airport. What they didn't know is how Teterboro would change — bloating itself from a dinky airport that served mostly single-engine, propeller-driven planes to a dinky airport where noisy corporate jets have shoe-horned themselves onto the tarmac.

The result is a dangerous prescription. Even some officials at the Port Authority, which runs Teterboro, concede privately that they worry about the possibility of one of those jets crashing into a residential neighborhood near the airport.

And now we're soundproofing a high school to block out the noise — an example of a massive Band-Aid if ever there was one.

The real question is not the noise from the jets. It's the lack of noise from leaders in demanding that Teterboro be shut down — or at least forced to ban all jets.

Plenty of political figures as diverse as former Bogota Mayor Steve Lonegan, the conservative Republican, and Rep. Steve Rothman, the Fair Lawn Democrat, have sounded off about how Teterboro has grown too large for its cramped neighborhood. But that criticism rises, then falls — like the passing of a jet. The bottom line is that little has changed over the years.

Corporate jets still line up each morning on the Teterboro runways, screaming over the close-knit working class neighborhoods of Hackensack. Other jets float into Teterboro all day, lining up their landing patterns over New

Milford, Teaneck, Bogota and Hackensack — flying even lower over those towns when the clouds are low. Indeed, the sight of a corporate jet approaching Teterboro while passing by the upper floors of Hackensack University Medical Center should be enough evidence that something is wrong with how the airport is used.

Pilots are little help. Privately, many tell me that Teterboro is dangerous — a land-locked equivalent of trying to land a jet on a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier. But few pilots dare to speak publicly. for fear of being ostracized by their fly-boy buddies. They also fear that federal regulators will further restrict where they fly in the New York City region. Sadly, many pilots still view flying in the 21st century in the same way cowboys saw the West in the 1800s — as one big open space.

Flying is generally safe. The statistics support that. But when it comes to Teterboro, statistics need to be balanced by common sense. And common sense dictates that Teterboro ought to ban jets. The airport is simply too small and the surrounding landscape is too crowded.

Which brings us back to the $18 million appropriated to soundproof Becton Regional High School.

Rothman, along with New Jersey's Democratic U.S. senators, Bob Menendez and Frank Lautenberg, joined hands — and uttered virtually the same words — to praise the decision by the Federal Aviation Administration's Airport Improvement Program to award the money.

"Learning is hard enough without the roar of jet engines overhead," Rothman said in one statement. "High school is hard enough without the sound of airplanes buzzing overhead," Menendez said. "Students and teachers shouldn't have to compete with the roar of jet engines overhead," Lautenberg said.

The operative word here is "overhead." And shouldn't that tell us something?

The problem is overhead — in the skies, with noisy jets. And yet, government's solution is to soundproof a school.

Actually, soundproofing is a fancy way to describe the fact that Becton Regional will upgrade its air conditioning and heating systems and install new windows and doors. What's more, Becton is not the first school to receive these upgrades.

Several other schools around Teterboro have received some sort of soundproofing — most of it paid for by federal grants. Over the past 25 years, the Port Authority has spent more than $350 million on soundproofing projects near airports in New York City and in New Jersey.

The problem is that not everyone gets to enjoy a noise-free life. Yes, it's important to reduce interruptions of children's schooling. But what about the rest of us?

For years, some judges at the Bergen County Courthouse routinely instructed witnesses to stop speaking when jets passed overhead so jurors would not be confused by what they heard. Indeed, the TV mini-series about the 1980s Baby M case featured a brief scene in which the judge halted testimony in a Hackensack courtroom so a jet could pass.

In 2003, a meeting of the Carlstadt-East Rutherford Regional School Board had to be halted several times because of Teterboro jets. "Over the years, everyone has learned to live with it," a school official announced that night.

Maybe so. Or maybe everyone just endures the nonsense from Teterboro. It's the Jersey way.

We put up with the noise and the eyesore of an airport designed for a time that has long since passed. We're left to soundproof our schools so our kids can learn math and chemistry.

When will the rest of us learn how crazy this is?
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on December 20, 2011, 02:11:13 PM
5 die in small-plane crash on NJ highway
By SAMANTHA HENRY | AP – 57 mins ago [December 20, 2011]

HARDING, N.J. (AP) — Five people died when a small plane headed for Georgia crashed on one of the New York City area's busiest highways.

Authorities say they were three adults and two children. It wasn't clear whether they were a family.

Witnesses told the FAA the single-engine appeared to break up as it spiraled into the wooden median strip and exploded on Interstate 287 in Harding, N.J.

FAA spokesman Jim Peters says the plane had taken off from Teterboro Airport and was headed for DeKalb Peachtree Airport near Atlanta.

Peters says there was a garbled transmission from the plane before it dropped off the radar.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on August 09, 2013, 02:17:33 PM
2 children, pilot missing in Connecticut plane crash
Friday, August 9, 2013    Last updated: Friday August 9, 2013, 1:58 PM
BY  ALLISON PRIES AND SHAWN BOBURG
STAFF WRITERS
The Record

Three people are missing after a prop plane that took off from Teterboro Airport crashed between two houses, setting them both on fire, as it approached a Connecticut airport.

(http://media.northjersey.com/images/300*227/080913planecrash_dngmvp.jpg)
A prop plane flying out of Teterboro crashed in Connecticut.
WTNH NEWS 8

The Rockwell International Turbo Commander 690B, a multi-engine turbo prop aircraft, crashed on approach into the Tweed New Haven Airport in Conn. at 11:25 a.m., a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The 11-seat plane had only a pilot onboard, airport officials said. The pilot and two children — ages 13 and 1, who were inside their Charter Oak Avenue in East Haven home — have not been recovered from the scene, officials said.

The mother of the two children was able to get out of the house, East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo said. No one was home in the other house at the time of the crash.

“It’s total devastation,” Maturo said, describing the back of the home.

A neighbor, David Esposito, said he heard a loud noise and then a thump. "No engine noise, nothing," he said.

"A woman was screaming her kids were in there," he said.

Esposito said he ran into the upstairs of the house, where the woman believed her children were, but they could not find them. They returned downstairs to search but he dragged the woman out when the flames became too strong.

The aircraft is registered to Ellumax Leasing, LLC of Medina, Wash. It was scheduled to depart at 10 a.m. Friday from the Port Authority-operated airport, according to flight records. But a Tweed Airport representative said it did not take off until 10:49 a.m.

A woman who answered the phone at Ellumax Friday afternoon declined to comment and hung up.

The plane was not based in Teterboro. It was transient, meaning it was passing through. It traveled to Teterboro Wednesday evening from Maryland, according to an aviation official.

The 12,500-pound aircraft refueled and departed from a terminal Friday morning that is operated by Meridian, a full-service private aviation company that services charter planes.

The refueling truck has been sequestered – standard procedure in such cases, the aviation official said. It will not service any other aircraft until investigators have a better idea of what caused the crash, he said.   

Tweed's airport manager, Lori Hoffman-Soares, said the twin commander was on instrument panel as it approached the airport. The plane was in communication with the tower until the crash and there were no distress calls, she said.

Hoffman-Soares said they believe the plane missed the approach.

This article contains material from The Associated Press.

Email: priesa@northjersey.com and boburg@northjersey.com

- See more at: http://www.northjersey.com/news/transportation/Plane_crash_in_Connecticut_originated_from_Teterboro.html?page=all#sthash.vEWkyfBj.dpuf
__________________________________________
The plane:
(http://www.powersportsupply.co/product_images/k/519/Rockwell%2520Turbo%2520Commander%2520690B__60041_zoom.jpg)

Look at the flight path below.  Was this a solo-pilot joy ride?
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on October 22, 2013, 12:19:50 AM
Plane skids off runway at Teterboro after landing gear collapses, police say (http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/print.html?entry=/2013/10/plane_skids_off_runway_at_teterboro_after_landing_gear_collapses_police_say.html)
Steve Strunsky/The Star-Ledger  By  Steve Strunsky/The Star-Ledger   
on October 21, 2013 at 5:55 PM

(http://media.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/photo/13621705-large.jpg)
Police said the rear landing gear of a single-engine plane appeared to have collapsed after the plane touched down this afternoon at Teterboro Airport, pictured here in 2010. John O'Boyle/Star-Ledger file photo

TETERBORO — Police say the rear landing gear of a small plane collapsed after the craft touched down at Teterboro Airport this afternoon, causing the plane to skid off the runway onto a grassy median.

The pilot, who was the only person on board, declined medical treatment, and police said no one else was hurt in the incident.

The single-engine aircraft landed at about 2 p.m., said Joe Pentangelo, a spokesman for the Port Authority Police Department.

The Federal Aviation Administration was sending an investigator to the scene, Pentangelo said.

 An initial police report of the landing suggested the plane's gear had not deployed. But Pentangelo said a subsequent report indicated that the landing gear did deploy, but collapsed after the plane touched down, and the plane came to rest on its belly.

Pentangelo said there were still no details about why the gear did not deploy, the extent of the damage to the plane, where it had taken off from or where it was headed.

Teterboro is a general aviation airport in Bergen County owned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. It is frequently used by business travelers headed to and from Manhattan, and by recreational pilots.

Aviation records indicate the aircraft is a Lancair, an amateur-built kit plane registered to Aviation Paw Inc., of Dover, DE, which has no published phone number.

According to flightaware.com, an aviation tracking site, the plane took off from Sioux Falls, SD, this morning at 8:09 a.m., before making a stop in Gary, IN, and then flying on to Teterboro at 12:40 p.m.
Title: Teterboro Meeting Tonight
Post by: Editor on October 15, 2015, 12:23:01 PM
THE PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK & NEW JERSEY
 NOTICE OF PUBLIC INFORMATION WORKSHOP
 14 CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATION (CFR) PART 150 AIRPORT NOISE COMPATIBILITY STUDY
 FOR TETERBORO AIRPORT

 The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey will be hosting a public information workshop in October 2015 to provide information regarding the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 150 (14 CFR Part 150) Airport Noise Compatibility Study for Teterboro (TEB) Airport. The workshop will include guided displays that will present information regarding the 14 CFR Part 150 Study process, the project schedule, noise metrics, and methods used to quantify aircraft noise exposure. A second public information workshop will be conducted for the TEB noise study in the Spring of 2016 to provide information regarding the first essential products of the 14 CFR Part 150 Study –
the 2016 and 2021 Noise Exposure Maps for TEB.

 The workshop will be held in an “open house” format from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the date listed below. No formal presentation will be given in order to provide the public with the maximum opportunity for one-on-one interaction and sharing of information and concerns. You may attend the workshop at any time during the two-hour open
 house.

TEB Public Information Workshop
 DATE: Thursday, October 15, 2015
 TIME: 6:00PM-8:00PM
 LOCATION: Holiday Inn Hasbrouck Heights
 283 Route 17 South, Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 07604

 The Part 150 public information workshop is accessible to people who are mobility impaired. Interpretation services are available upon advance request. To make arrangements for such services please contact the Noise Office at (212)435-3880 or via email at NJPART150@panynj.gov no later than (3) days before the workshop for
 which the services are being requested.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 08, 2016, 10:33:52 PM
http://www.northjersey.com/news/faa-testing-new-flight-path-to-teterboro-airport-1.1524552

The Federal Aviation Administration announced Tuesday afternoon that it will begin testing a new flight path to Teterboro Airport that will divert aircraft that usually fly over Hackensack to a route a few miles west that follows the heavily traveled state highway.

The FAA said the test, which will begin on April 4 and last no more than six months, would "provide noise relief for the Hackensack University Medical Center area."
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: just watching on March 14, 2016, 08:28:28 AM
this is very good news for the quality of life in Hackensack.

I saw on TV people from Mahwah, 20 miles away, protesting this change because THEY will be under the new flight path. What was missing from that newscast was information on how high the planes are in Mahwah while approaching Teterboro, and how long they are in Hackensack, which is so close to the airport.  Therefore the complaints are not comparable.
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 26, 2016, 03:19:11 PM
http://www.northjersey.com/news/mahwah-plans-to-argue-against-looming-new-teterboro-flight-path-1.1533651
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 30, 2016, 08:24:05 PM
http://www.northjersey.com/news/proposed-teterboro-approach-path-moves-noisy-jets-closer-to-schools-stores-1.1534749

http://pix11.com/2016/03/30/bergen-county-towns-urge-faa-to-postpone-test-of-new-flight-path-to-teterboro-airport/

http://www.northjersey.com/news/faa-refuses-to-delay-launch-of-new-teterboro-flight-path-1.1535136




Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on April 25, 2016, 02:41:21 PM
http://www.northjersey.com/news/teterboro-s-new-flight-path-goes-untested-1.1551909
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on July 11, 2016, 11:19:34 AM
http://www.northjersey.com/news/teterboro-airport-tests-controversial-new-approach-pattern-1.1628392
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on January 13, 2017, 03:19:26 PM
Airport Noise and Land Use Compatibility Study Newsletter for Teterboro Airport (TEB).  This is the fourth in a series that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is distributing to those interested in learning more about the TEB Part 150 Study process. 

http://panynjpart150.com/AdminPages/GetProjectFile.asp?a=TEB4&f=TEB%20-%20Part%20150%20Study%20Newsletter%20-%20Winter%202017.pdf

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 21, 2017, 10:26:55 PM
Thinking outside the box (or line for that matter):

https://youtu.be/tJlaRgF4jJ8
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on March 28, 2017, 02:20:28 PM
[The following was sent to me for posting]

RE: AIRPLANES FLIGHTS OVER PROSPECT AVENUE INTO TETERBORO AIRPORT

A meeting has been scheduled where residents can express their concerns to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) about the numerous flights over our area.  Residents are primarily concerned about the safety of such flights over this densely populated neighborhood, as well as the noise and pollution. More recently, there have been few flights because of temperature, season, etc., but you only have to remember what it was like last summer.
The meeting is set for Wednesday, April 26, at 7:00 PM, 90 Moonachie Avenue (not Street), Airport Administration Building, Teterboro, in the conference room.  Parking is available at the site. 

The Hackensack Condo/Co-op Advisory Board has been in contact with various government agencies to have planes rerouted. This request for your attendance is being made to residents of all buildings in the area through the Hackensack Condo/Co-op Advisory Board. Only with a large turnout can we hope to garner the needed attention to have the FAA reconsider their actions.

The FAA had conducted a trial where planes would be sent over Route 17, rather than over our area.  However, at the completion of the trial period, they found there was “not sufficient usage” to justify it becoming permanent.  In the opinion of the Hackensack Condo/Co-op Advisory Board, the test should have ensured that sufficient traffic flew over Route 17, so that a proper evaluation could have been made.

PLEASE GATHER YOUR FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS AND ATTEND THIS MEETING.

This meeting is being held by TANAAC (Teterboro Noise Abatement Advisory Committee).
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 15, 2017, 05:03:20 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/US/learjet-crashes-industrial-area-northern-jersey-police/story?id=47423304

http://www.nj.com/bergen/index.ssf/2017/05/teterboro_crash_most_serious_since_2005_crash_inju.html
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 16, 2017, 06:17:11 PM
The actual impact.  Warning: Not for everyone.

https://youtu.be/rCiW7zwafXk
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on May 21, 2017, 08:23:09 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oij1qg8XGRA
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 16, 2017, 01:11:51 PM
http://www.northjersey.com/story/news/bergen/hackensack/2017/06/15/hackensack-host-faa-officials-questions-teterboro-flight-path/396688001/

Video of FAA/Teterboro Meeting, June 15, 2017: https://youtu.be/Q-urh614AQM

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: vsasson on June 18, 2017, 08:10:29 AM
The Record and Hackensack Daily Voice both reported on Wednesday night's City Hall meeting with FAA and Teterboro Airport officials, who explained why the "quieter" flight path for landing aircraft was abandoned last October: It was too much work for pilots.

http://thesassonreport.blogspot.com/2017/06/elite-pilots-reject-extra-work-to.html

Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on June 23, 2017, 02:35:12 PM
http://www.northjersey.com/story/opinion/readers/2017/06/22/letter-current-teterboro-airport-flight-path-still-dangerous/417341001/

Letter: Current Teterboro Airport flight path still dangerous

A recent article about the noise, pollution and public safety issues involving Teterboro Airport omitted some important facts. Although the story accurately stated that a large crowd of area residents attended a recent Federal Aviation Administration hearing in Hackensack, it failed to hold FAA officials accountable for scrapping the trial of a much better and safer alternative flight path than the current system in place.

The story left many readers believing that the alternative path had been given a fair trial by the FAA. This is completely false. Many residents believe the exact opposite — that it was set up to fail. Here’s why.

The vast majority of the jets that use Teterboro land with the help of a Flight Management System that guides them along the current flight path following a charted course. But pilots using the new alternative flight path had a much more difficult challenge. They couldn’t use their FMS without manually entering longitude/latitude coordinates because the FAA didn’t provide them. So these pilots had to land “on their own” without using their automated FMS equipment.

With an obstacle like that, no one should be surprised that just one-quarter of one percent of the 90,000 flights in and out of Teterboro during this six-month “trial” actually tried the new alternate path. This is why many people believe this entire process was essentially a smokescreen to protect the status quo.

We do not accept the FAA explanation, or the noise, pollution and flat-out danger of the current flight path, which brings about 500 planes dangerously close to high-rise buildings on Prospect Avenue and the ever-expanding Hackensack University Medical Center every single day. Imagine the carnage and loss of life that would result if a plane crashed into one of these tall buildings, just as one crashed into an empty smaller building a few weeks ago. We know there is a better, safer way, and it deserves a fair trial by the FAA.

John Labrosse
Hackensack, June 19

Kathy Canestrino
Hackensack, June 19

The writers are the mayor and deputy mayor of the city of Hackensack
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 13, 2017, 08:32:17 AM
http://www.northjersey.com/story/news/bergen/hackensack/2017/09/12/hackensack-deputy-mayor-presents-updates-teterboro-flight-path-situation/658768001/
Title: Re: Teterboro Airport
Post by: Editor on September 16, 2017, 07:16:10 PM
http://hackensack.dailyvoice.com/politics/see-low-flying-plane-take-a-picture-hackensack-officials-urge/721644/#294