Author Topic: HUMC Expansion  (Read 59076 times)

Offline Editor

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Re: HUMC Expansion
« Reply #75 on: August 07, 2018, 08:29:41 AM »
NorthJersey.com: HUMC opens major research site at La Roche site

https://njersy.co/2vLJTvQ


Offline ericmartindale

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Re: HUMC Expansion
« Reply #77 on: December 25, 2018, 01:54:55 PM »
I'm interested in Reiner's comment on the combined stormwater and sanitary sewer system.

"If a developer comes and proposes a project, then theyre going to have to fix the system along Second Street and Atlantic Street and separate out those systems so the stormwater can go into the river and the sewage can go into [the Bergen County Utilities Authority], like its supposed to," Reiner said at the meeting.

To me this is a good sign that people are now thinking in the right direction. I have long advocated that the best way and cheapest way to solve this problem is to get stormwater out of the system, not build a new sanitary sewer system with literally thousands of major plumbing connections. The number of storm sewer grates draining into the combined system is only in the dozens. I continue to believe that a major discharge pipe can be built from the vicinity of Railroad Ave direct to the river, and it will drain east by gravity.  It would be relatively shallow at Railroad Ave, and pretty deep around State Street, but that's OK. As long as it is fairly straight, at good 5' in diameter, and drains by gravity, it will work.

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Offline ericmartindale

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Re: HUMC Expansion
« Reply #83 on: July 16, 2019, 10:05:29 PM »
I was astounded to learn recently that a long section of Second Street south of Atlantic Street is going to be encased in a hospital expansion project, and the street will effectively become a tunnel. This will be the largest expansion ever of HUMC.  What's the point of approving a hospital parking tower, perhaps 20 years ago, with a lawn and a normal setback from Second Street, if that entire setback and even the air over the street is going to be a future hospital project.  This project is approved, and 100% will be built.  I wonder if the city is being paid air rights for use of the air over the street?

Offline Victor E Sasson

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Re: HUMC Expansion
« Reply #84 on: July 18, 2019, 06:09:45 PM »
A city councilman said those projects -- a tower with patient rooms and a separate power plant -- will be paying full property taxes. The power plant apparently won't have any solar, geothermal or other alternative energy, though. (I can imagine hospital officials dismissing solar and geothermal as "experimental" forms of energy.) Why do so few schools, hospitals and public projects ignore solar and geothermal energy? I think only one of the high-rises on Prospect Avenue has solar panels, but The New York Times Sunday edition had a cover story on residential towers in the city embracing solar. At my home in Hackensack, I installed solar in 2009, when we bought the house, increased the number of panels in 2012, and this past March had three Tesla storage batteries installed so that my home is self-powered, zeroing out my electric bill.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2019, 06:16:51 PM by Victor E Sasson »

Offline ericmartindale

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Re: HUMC Expansion
« Reply #85 on: July 19, 2019, 07:48:33 AM »
Solar is getting much more economical, meaning the cost to install versus the yield. I recently looked into selling solar to homeowners, and what I learned will send a jolt to every environmentally concerned person. The manufacturers and sales organizations are tightly monitoring the profit curve in the industry, which is swinging up. They only want the homeowner to save just enough money to make an incentive to install the system, and there is only so much that the sales organization will allow the salesperson to earn. The more economical that solar becomes, the more that the manufacturers and sales organizations will charge, and if there's really profit, you'll see most of it spent on advertising for a sales organization to get name recognition. That last step is just starting to kick in. That's where the money is going as the technology improves. It's never going to go to the salesperson. And it's absolutely never going to go to the homeowner. So right now, with electric prices so high in parts of New York, the most profit can be made on Staten Island and Long Island. North Jersey is far behind, and electricity prices are so low at the Jersey Shore that there's hardly any incentive that at all.

Offline Editor

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Re: HUMC Expansion
« Reply #86 on: September 12, 2019, 06:15:22 PM »

 

anything