Author Topic: Pedestrian/vehicular accidents & fatalities  (Read 2023 times)

Offline Editor

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Pedestrian/vehicular accidents & fatalities
« on: February 26, 2013, 02:30:33 PM »
Interactive map: 14 pedestrians killed in Bergen County in 2011


View Bergen County Pedestrian Fatalities, 2009-2011 in a larger map

BERGEN COUNTY Fourteen pedestrians were killed on Bergen County roads in 2011, according to an analysis of federal traffic fatality data.

The Tri-State Transportation Campaign, a group advocating for reduced car dependency, found that Essex Street in Hackensack and Route 17 were the deadliest roadways for pedestrians.

Fourty-one pedestrians died on Bergen County roads from 2009 through 2011, the analysis found. The 14 deaths in 2011 represented a slight decrease from 2010, when 15 pedestrians died.

Four pedestrians died on Essex Street from 2009 through 2011, more than any other road in Bergen County.

Hackensack Police in 2011 blamed sun glare for the accidents, the Record reported.

"That's a very busy area and everyone should take a moment to walk an extra block to an intersection controlled by a traffic signal," then-Capt. Tomas Padilla said.

Stephen Lo Iacono, city manager, told NJ.com that Hackensack and Bergen County had made improvements to the lighting, traffic signals and crosswalks at the intersections between Summit and Prospect avenues and Essex Street since 2011. More improvements are planned for the areas east and west of Hackensack University Medical Center, which drives much of the traffic volume on Essex, he said.

Since then, Hackensack has adopted a Complete Streets policy, which calls for roads to be designed to accommodate all modes of transportation, especially pedestrian, the Hackensack Chronicle reported.

The Tri-State Transportation Campaign has advocated for more local governments to adopt Complete Streets policies.

"It's the implementation of these Complete Streets policies that will have the biggest impact on safety," Janna Chernetz, New Jersey advocate for the campaign, said.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2013, 02:33:18 PM by Editor »



Offline vsasson

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Re: Pedestrian/vehicular accidents & fatalities
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2013, 03:01:40 PM »
Judging from all the stop-sign violators in my neighborhood, I feel confident to say the police do not enforce traffic laws in Hackensack. I would like to see a crackdown on speeders and stop-sign violators, and red-light cameras throughout the city. If I'm elected to the City Council, I would urge the city to dedicate money generated by traffic tickets and red-light cameras to property tax relief or, if that's not possible, to street paving, so at least sane, law-abiding drivers don't get their teeth rattled. I do not buy the argument that smooth streets invite more speeding -- we have speeders aplenty now with our crappy streets.

Offline Editor

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Re: Pedestrian/vehicular accidents & fatalities
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2013, 03:12:40 PM »

Offline Editor

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Re: Pedestrian/vehicular accidents & fatalities
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2014, 02:26:17 PM »
Bergen among deadliest N.J. counties for older pedestrians, report findson August 14, 2014 at 11:05 AM, updated August 14, 2014 at 11:07 AM

BERGEN COUNTY Almost half of the pedestrians killed in a 10-year period in Bergen County were aged 60 or older, a new report says.

The report by Tri-State Transportation Campaign, a non-profit transit advocacy group, examined federal data for traffic fatalities from 2003 through 2012.

It found that 44.3 percent of the 131 pedestrians killed in that time period were 60 or older. That group makes up only 20.4 percent of the population.

More than a quarter of the fatalities were people 75 or older, though they account for 7.6 percent of the total population, the report found.

Bergen County led the state in older pedestrian fatalities, with 58, the report found. However, Atlantic County had the highest number of older pedestrian fatalities per capita, with 4.58 deaths per 100,000 people, compared to Bergens 3.18 per 100,000 rate.

Among a list of recommendations, the Campaign said New Jersey should prioritize roadway improvements, adopt Complete Streets policies that design roads to account for pedestrian and bicycle traffic and toughen penalties for drivers who kill or injure pedestrians.

Related story: http://www.nj.com/bergen/index.ssf/2014/06/hackensack_woman_identified_as_pedestrian_struck_killed_by_lumber_truck.html   


 

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