Author Topic: Property Taxes  (Read 39405 times)

Offline wetochwink

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Property Taxes
« on: May 10, 2005, 09:39:05 AM »
Whatever the outcome of today's mayor and council race - its time to move on to the next election race - Governor. NJPolitics.com provides links to all who are running.

Since hardly anyone running for Mayor / Council focused on issues such as property taxes, I thought it was worth bringing to focus a political race that will.

I'm trying to gather any or all information regarding property taxes from candidates wanting to run for governor.

The more I look into this - property taxes appear to be a Republican issue in the race for governor. With Corizine appearing to be the only front runner for the Democrats - I don't any statements on the issue by Senator Corizine from his web site.

I guess since Gov. Codey eliminated the property tax rebate this fall - its no wonder why Republicans are raising the issue.

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Doug Forrester

http://www.30in3.com/htmlNew/index.asp

I know its early to pick who to vote for, but Forrester sure knows how to grab one's attention. I thought the savings calculator was interesting to share. It may be nonsense and then again it may not be.

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Bret Schindler - Property Tax Amendment Reform

After plugging in values for Bergen County and Hackensack the following was provided on Schindler's web site.

Stand Up for Hackensack!

Its time we demand that our community receive its fair share of state funding!

Every year, as New Jerseys economy grows, state tax collections grow.

State politicians spend these new dollars creating new state programs and adding friends to the state payroll.

Legislation being debated in Trenton would force state politicians to start sending a fair share of these new dollars to public schools, municipalities and counties to improve local services and lower property taxes.

Studies show the passage of this legislation would cause property taxes all throughout New Jersey to fall year after year after year.

Had these Permanent Property Tax Reduction Amendments been passed last year:

Hackensacks public schools would already be receiving $4,403,279.93 more in state funding;

Hackensacks municipal government would already be receiving $4,474,098.08 more in state funding;

Hackensacks tax obligation to Bergen County would already have been reduced by  $580,731.14 this year; 

And Hackensacks property owners and tenants would already be enjoying $9,458,109.15 in total property tax savings!

Most property owners in New Jersey would have saved about 10% in property taxes this year. To find out what YOUR personal savings would have been, type your address into our Tax Savings Calculator at www.bret2005.com.

If you want lower property taxes, it is time to stand up for Hackensack and demand that our community receive its fair share of state funding!

*********************************
John Murphy

http://www.murphy2005.com/main/proptax.html

***********************************
Robert Schroeder

PROPERTY TAXES

Our property taxes continue to skyrocket, rising out of control. Yet, the career politicians who fail to address the problem remain in office year after year.

As a local elected official and fiscal conservative, I know first hand that quick fix budgets and funding gimmicks (like bonding and tax increases) are useless. Until you cut costs, eliminate waste, and curb the political abuse of taxpayer dollars, property taxes will continue to rise.

I am an ardent supporter of shared administrative services among municipalities looking to lower their property taxes and plan to utilize cost cutting measures like this to create savings. Sharing staff and administrative duties, coordinated purchasing of supplies, and sharing public works, employees and equipment all create tremendous savings. Without ever touching local emergency services, we can accumulate substantial savings in the payroll, benefit and financing costs that make up a big chunk of local budgets.

Most importantly, we must eliminate the political deals and no-bid insider contracts that drive up the cost of government. It's time to throw the career politicians out and save taxpayer's more of their hard earned money.




 


« Last Edit: March 31, 2006, 08:59:45 AM by Editor »



Offline Editor

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Re: Property Taxes - Governors Race
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2006, 03:55:52 PM »
« Last Edit: March 31, 2006, 09:17:59 AM by Editor »

Offline Editor

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2006, 09:00:41 AM »
Latest story: Budget boosts school tax bill

See related post: BOE- Priming the Pump (From last year)
« Last Edit: March 31, 2006, 05:02:58 PM by Editor »

Offline Netnick

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2006, 02:20:52 PM »
Any idea on when the re-evaluation results will be ready? Between those results and the recent news here, I wonder if any of us can afford to keep living in Hackensack. I'm already paying over $7100 on a small cape which is rediculous!

Offline Editor

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Property Tax Forum
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2006, 09:35:15 AM »
10/10/05

A property tax forum sponsored the District 37 state legislators is scheduled for 4 to 8 p.m. today on Fairleigh Dic kinson University's Hackensack campus.

State Sen. Loretta Weinberg, D-Teaneck, and Assembly members Valerie Vainieri Huttle, D-Englewood, and Gordon Johnson, D-Englewood, will be on hand to listen to ideas about property tax reform.

The discussion will be held in Dic kinson Hall, 140 University Plaza Drive. For more information, call 201-541-1118 or 201-928-0100.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2006, 04:39:15 PM by Editor »

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2006, 09:42:34 AM »

Offline Editor

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2007, 09:32:33 AM »

Offline Netnick

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2007, 10:26:36 AM »
Has anyone else received their new assessments yet? Mine went up 2.41 times the current assessed rate. Also, when do we find out the new tax rate???

Offline itsme

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2007, 12:22:40 PM »
I received my new assessment.  My property value went up 3 times as much.  I called the assessor's office and was told that we would not know the new rate until the school board budget was decided.  I was also told that the new tax bill would come out in May.  However, if anyone wants to appeal the assessment, the appeal must be filed prior to April 1.

Offline Editor

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2007, 09:40:55 AM »
From today's "Your Views" in The Record:

Contributing Editor James Ahearn ("Pressing for property-tax relief," Opinion, Page O-2, Jan.14) suggests that conflicting interests between seniors on fixed incomes and parents of school-age children will, among other factors, inhibit the resolution of the New Jersey property tax di- lemma.

He also indicates a potential for division between municipalities and their employees if towns cannot increase tax revenues because of Governor Corzine's proposed tax cap. It is unlikely that in an election year any Legislature would restrict the raising of funds that substantially pay for education and municipal services. Such a restriction may provoke teachers and municipal workers into acts of labor unrest and even political retribution.

If property tax reform is to become a reality, then we must look to the state income tax for a solution. The present system based on property assessment does not distinguish between rich and poor and incorrectly views them as equals.

A fair and reasonable approach is to require those with the highest incomes to pay a higher state income tax. The state could use that money to help finance education, thus reducing property taxes.

Jack Isaacs

Hackensack, Jan. 14
____________________________

I have been following with amusement the bantering of our elected officials on property tax reform ("New hurdle to tax relief: caps on local spending," Page A-1, Jan. 4).

The approaches being proposed will do little to reduce the never-ending increases in property taxes. As your articles have shown, the two biggest items driving property taxes upward are the increasing salaries and benefits for police and teachers. Since the rate of increase of these two items is not likely to decrease due to the power of their unions, the only realistic way to reduce property taxes is to fund these items via a broad-based tax such as the income tax.

Spending caps coupled with the 20 percent tax reduction proposed by Governor Corzine will accomplish little, buying just a little time after which we would be back to Square One.

The property tax is fundamentally a tax on real estate, which is not really indicative of wealth (i.e., ability to pay). One could hold millions of dollars in cash, stocks, bonds, jewelry, works of art, etc., and not pay a dime annually in property taxes if one rents a modest house or apartment. Income is a much better indicator of one's ability to pay. Ask the federal government.

John V. Albano

Oradell, Jan. 8
________________________________________

New Jersey voters sent a clear message when they rejected half of all school budgets in April: They want tax relief.

One way to bring tax relief to property owners is to switch from property taxes to an earned income tax to pay for education.

It is the fairest system based on "ability to pay." Lower-income households would keep most of what they earn while higher-income recipients can afford to pay more.

Everyone who earns an income, including renters, would contribute directly to the education of our communities' youngsters. Some would argue renters already pay property taxes in the rent they pay their landlords. But they are not contributing to schools at the same rate as owner-occupied residents.

Property taxes keep going up for retirees living on fixed incomes. Why should older folks who own property have to pay for the education of renters' kids? At some point, retirees deserve a break after having paid school taxes for 30 to 40 years.

Jim Geist

Hewitt, Jan. 1

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Property Taxes
« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2007, 10:04:19 AM »

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Property Taxes
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2007, 11:47:17 AM »

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2007, 09:36:40 AM »
From Today's North Jersey Brief's in the The Record:

HACKENSACK -- Informal meetings on the city's reevaluation have come to an end, and postcards notifying property owners of their new assessments are scheduled to go out next week, officials said.

City Manager Stephen Lo Iacono told the council this week that fewer owners than expected requested meetings to discuss their new assessments.

"It went a lot smoother than what everyone had anticipated,'' Lo Iacono said.

Lo Iacono said the new assessments have been sent to the county, and once they are certified, postcards will be mailed.

Once property owners receive the cards, they have 45 days to appeal to the county.

Surveys indicate that Hackensack's taxable properties were assessed at only 45.7 percent of market value before the revaluation.

-- Monsy Alvarado


See also: N.J. tax reform headed to governor
« Last Edit: February 07, 2007, 03:34:35 PM by Editor »

Offline Netnick

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2007, 11:18:51 AM »
Now that Hackensack will be getting an increase of 12% in school aid, do you think that the school end of the tax bill will go down, remain the same, or rise? Also, does anyone know when voting on the school budget is? Cross you fingers this year everyone....
« Last Edit: February 27, 2007, 02:58:04 PM by Editor »

Offline Netnick

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Re: Property Taxes
« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2007, 09:55:16 AM »
Did anyone see in The Record today that the municipal budget is going up 8.7%?!? Even better, the budget relies on taxpayers paying 13.9% more than last year!!!!!!!! And this doesn't even include school or county taxes!!!!!!!!!! I'd like to thank everyone who voted the whole slate of New Visions in on the last municipal election rather than choosing candidates from multiple slates. Now can I borrow some spare change...maybe a few hundred or so?!?!?!?!?